U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Genealogy
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-09-2013, 12:21 AM
 
45 posts, read 29,073 times
Reputation: 79

Advertisements

I started looking at genealogy in 1978 but lost interest. I loaned my papers to my brother that kept them a few year the gave them to my other brother. The first brother worked on it for a bit but I think he lost interest too. Now his 12 year old grand daughter is interested. My brother and some of his children and grandchildren are LDS and this girl is using a LDS software to do the tree. I just met her for the first time and she is says she has some back to 1200 or so. My great aunt was LDS and had us back to 1599 and I photocopied her work around 1980 when she was elderly and blind so wanted help writing in dates.

So I have a mixture of family stories I asked my grandparents, great aunts and uncles and others about and some old records I found in libraries and photocopies that are so faded I can't hardly read them. My mom died the week before last and I have already lost all the earlier generations. I don't have kids so don't really need to do this work. But since I will retire next year and the girl wants info I am thinking of typing in all the faded photocopies and scanning what is good enough to send to her.

I found the LDS program and typed in a few generations from memory and it made some links so this might be pretty easy to help the kid out. Since I am 65 I can remember most of the last few generations and people told me lots of things and I have some photos my great aunt gave me. I will scan them for the girl, I showed them to her when she was here to see my mom before she died and her dad was interested too.

Funny thing is my brother adopted her dad so they aren't blood related so I don't see why they are interested. We got her dad when he was 4 and his sister was 1 so I am sure he remembers being adopted. His sister said my brother married her mom on her first birthday so I know she knows they were adopted.

My brothers only have 3 blood descendants and I don't have any and of the grand children only 4 are blood most are adopted and at least one of the grandchildren will never have children. This seems like a waste of time since none of the blood descendents are interested. Oh well I have plenty of time to waste and it makes the girl happy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-09-2013, 01:45 AM
bjh
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,041 posts, read 22,775,493 times
Reputation: 119681
Well, LDS does have a lot of useful resources. I'm glad they share them with non-LDS.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2013, 02:24 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,971 posts, read 17,131,123 times
Reputation: 30080
Anything you can hand down like stories and memories will be things she could never get on her own. Putting names and dates to old photographs would be valuable information. I don't know why she'd be interested if she isn't related by blood but she just may have her reasons and it's probably enjoyable for her so she wouldn't be doing it. You should help her.
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2013, 06:57 AM
 
38 posts, read 61,805 times
Reputation: 44
It seems to me that it doesn't matter to the young lady whether the folks in these records are "blood" or not... they are her family nonetheless. You'd be doing her a good turn in providing all the info you can. :-)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2013, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Southern California
394 posts, read 1,295,818 times
Reputation: 503
I was adopted at birth in a closed adoption, and I think because of not knowing my own family history, I've always been fascinated by genealogy. When I was in high school, my dad (adoptive) let me look into his family background, and I got a whole bunch of information from his uncle. It didn't really matter to me that I wasn't a blood relative, it was all just so interesting, and it made me feel more a part of the family, strange as that might sound. Years later, I used those skills to conduct my own birth search and found my birth parents. Ever since then, I've been doing the research into my own blood family, and even worked on it with my birthfather while he was alive. Any help you can give your young relative will probably be greatly appreciated by her, and it's really nice that you're willing to do that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2013, 08:34 PM
 
2,319 posts, read 1,980,315 times
Reputation: 3812
Oh, I can relate! I'm an only child and the "last of my line" because I don't have children, either, but I'm very wrapped up in learning where I came from for my own sake -- just because I won't leave it for posterity doesn't make me any less energetic about finding all these people! I look at it as a way to connect with my ancestors, which feels very relevant right now, because so far, my future holds only me -- but it's the journey that counts, and I might find someone else yet!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2013, 05:15 AM
 
4,135 posts, read 9,115,274 times
Reputation: 2677
I use LDS for only one thing: citable records: census, vital statistics, actual records of a person ( birth, marriage, death), etc.

I use LDS for hints at other things - as actual trees. Then I hunt down sources.

The reason I do this is because an LDS friend told me that there are people who just put down what fits without citation; she showed me this while I was trying to locate a birth record for a person in my hubby's family -- and the family line was cited but no records, no original source.

If you want to do it right, cite it by an actual record. This is also a problem with Ancestry and other sites: no citation needed.

Thank heavens for LDS microfilmed records, but places like the Library of Congress have a lot as well ( check NARA and thomas.gov as well as Library of Congress --things appear in different places and not always in all)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2013, 05:36 AM
 
11,686 posts, read 13,074,643 times
Reputation: 30973
Quote:
Originally Posted by aliceacrasperfolk View Post
...Funny thing is my brother adopted her dad so they aren't blood related so I don't see why they are interested. We got her dad when he was 4 and his sister was 1 so I am sure he remembers being adopted. His sister said my brother married her mom on her first birthday so I know she knows they were adopted.

My brothers only have 3 blood descendants and I don't have any and of the grand children only 4 are blood most are adopted and at least one of the grandchildren will never have children. This seems like a waste of time since none of the blood descendents are interested. Oh well I have plenty of time to waste and it makes the girl happy.
These comments really give me the chills.

I have several adopted cousins in different parts of my families. They all know they are adopted, but they are all considered as much a part of the family as children born into it. And for their part they are totally integrated into the family. The bottom line: THEY ARE FAMILY.

One of my strongest emotional commitments is with a stepgrandmother, who was my grandfather's wife at the time I was born. I certainly knew that she was a step relative, but it mattered not, and I have spent a good deal of time researching her family and corresponding with new-found members of her family. Again, the same answer: SHE IS FAMILY.

The idea that blood creates some special bond that trumps the emotional family bonds that develop through adoptive and step relationships is totally bizarre. I think someone who doesn't understand this, doesn't understand love.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2013, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,216 posts, read 12,800,785 times
Reputation: 10446
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
These comments really give me the chills.

I have several adopted cousins in different parts of my families. They all know they are adopted, but they are all considered as much a part of the family as children born into it. And for their part they are totally integrated into the family. The bottom line: THEY ARE FAMILY.

One of my strongest emotional commitments is with a stepgrandmother, who was my grandfather's wife at the time I was born. I certainly knew that she was a step relative, but it mattered not, and I have spent a good deal of time researching her family and corresponding with new-found members of her family. Again, the same answer: SHE IS FAMILY.

The idea that blood creates some special bond that trumps the emotional family bonds that develop through adoptive and step relationships is totally bizarre. I think someone who doesn't understand this, doesn't understand love.
Well said. Our parents are our family regardless of whether we are adopted or not and therefore their genealogy is our family history too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2013, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Canada
3,673 posts, read 2,481,389 times
Reputation: 4733
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuffaloTransplant View Post
The reason I do this is because an LDS friend told me that there are people who just put down what fits without citation; she showed me this while I was trying to locate a birth record for a person in my hubby's family -- and the family line was cited but no records, no original source.
I wouldn't ignore unsourced trees completely. They can provide possible clues as to where to direct the search for confirming records and sometimes the information in the trees turns out to be accurate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Genealogy
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top