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Old 07-31-2013, 07:14 AM
 
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The thing to remember about DNA testing is that nationalities don't matter. DNA testing goes back tens of thousands of years, to a time long before anything resembling nation-states existed. The best DNA testing can do is tell you what nations have populations that are similar to your genetic background.

Being of British descent, I'm not surprised your test turned out the way it did. The Brits are a mongrel people due to having experienced so many influxes of new peoples. They were originally Celts, but later had Anglo-Saxons, Romans, Normans and Scandinavians come to the island, let alone the immigration that has occurred in the last century.

For that reason, DNA testing is not really all that useful for genealogy if a person is primarily interested in family trees. But it is really fascinating if you want to see where your genes come from going back to the dawn of time.

Also, virtually all non-Africans will exhibit some Neanderthal DNA, though Europeans have the highest percentage while people from central and east Asia have less. There have been some very good documentaries on Nat Geo and Nova about the Neanderthals and how a lot of us still have their genetic material.
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Old 07-31-2013, 08:23 AM
 
Location: IN A COOKIE JAR
1,526 posts, read 1,274,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by War Beagle View Post
The thing to remember about DNA testing is that nationalities don't matter. DNA testing goes back tens of thousands of years, to a time long before anything resembling nation-states existed. The best DNA testing can do is tell you what nations have populations that are similar to your genetic background.

Being of British descent, I'm not surprised your test turned out the way it did. The Brits are a mongrel people due to having experienced so many influxes of new peoples. They were originally Celts, but later had Anglo-Saxons, Romans, Normans and Scandinavians come to the island, let alone the immigration that has occurred in the last century.

For that reason, DNA testing is not really all that useful for genealogy if a person is primarily interested in family trees. But it is really fascinating if you want to see where your genes come from going back to the dawn of time.

Also, virtually all non-Africans will exhibit some Neanderthal DNA, though Europeans have the highest percentage while people from central and east Asia have less. There have been some very good documentaries on Nat Geo and Nova about the Neanderthals and how a lot of us still have their genetic material.
Thank you War Beagle. By the way, I have a beagle and her name is Sara Lee.

Anyway, yeah I care little for researching my family tree, that is what my father is trying to do right now but I wanted the DNA. I figured people adopt, and all sorts of other things that can confuse your actual ancestry. I am curious if he can locate when and how the India/Asian came into our genetics though.

I will look those documentaries up. I am a visual learner anyway, so it's easier for me retain information from a show than it is from reading it.

As far as the Neanderthals, why is it that Africans do not possess those genes when supposedly we all wandered out of Africa eons ago? Are the Neanderthal non-human? If they are basically human wouldn't the Africans have some in them too? Did two different species develop in two different parts of the world and then humans who traveled north mated with the other species but those who stayed in Africa did not? I guess I'll find out when I watch those documentaries you suggested.

I truly appreciate all the posts I've received in this thread. Thank you all.

Here's my baby girl Beagle - Sara Lee. There's not two of her, she is looking into a mirror.
Attached Thumbnails
Has anyone else been ubber surprised by their dna results????-dscn2850-800x628-.jpg  
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Old 07-31-2013, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Eastwood, Orlando FL
1,260 posts, read 1,421,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GINGERSNAP1963 View Post
Oh Jenny, I am so sorry about my comment on Celts being possibly from Spain. I had no idea you had posted a link with the information on it.

I just wanted to say that in one of my previous posts I wasn't trying to slam your reference material, heck, I had not even read it or knew what it was about yet. I was planning on reading it later because I needed to get back to work. I'm so sorry if it appeared that way. I was citing something all together different from an article I had read on the internet and, you know, everything you read on the internet is true har har. None of my references can even be remotely compared to your college education on the subject. I highly respect your opinion and will read the link today when I'm not busy.

I'll admit all day long to being a dingbat, but a meanie I am not.
I'm In school. I went back at 42. I'm Not even close to graduated so I'm no expert.
It just so happens that my most recent researc progject was on the use of DNA to prove gene flow .
I only mentioned that I did not see Celt on my DNA test because another poster had asked about it. No worries. I had assumed you were talking to someone else anyway.
As to why you (and I) have Asian DNA in small amounts. It likely because years ago, possibly many thousands humans made their way into Europe after have lived in Asia for many years. It's also posible there really was a random Asian ancestor somewhere.
You can take your raw DNA from whatever place tested it and upload it to GedCom. IT's free and they have all kinds of different DNA tests on there that you can do to get more specialized genetic info. IT's free too

Just saw your question on Neanderthals. They are an extinct species of the genus (Homo), very closely related to modern humans. They likely dveirged from a common ancestor around 400,000 years ago. They likely came from Homo Heidelbergensus . The African branch of this species evolved toward modern humans and the European branch evolved to be Neanderthals

Last edited by JennyMominRI; 07-31-2013 at 08:46 AM..
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Old 07-31-2013, 08:48 AM
 
8,199 posts, read 6,130,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GINGERSNAP1963 View Post
Thank you War Beagle. By the way, I have a beagle and her name is Sara Lee.

Anyway, yeah I care little for researching my family tree, that is what my father is trying to do right now but I wanted the DNA. I figured people adopt, and all sorts of other things that can confuse your actual ancestry. I am curious if he can locate when and how the India/Asian came into our genetics though.

I will look those documentaries up. I am a visual learner anyway, so it's easier for me retain information from a show than it is from reading it.

As far as the Neanderthals, why is it that Africans do not possess those genes when supposedly we all wandered out of Africa eons ago? Are the Neanderthal non-human? If they are basically human wouldn't the Africans have some in them too? Did two different species develop in two different parts of the world and then humans who traveled north mated with the other species but those who stayed in Africa did not? I guess I'll find out when I watch those documentaries you suggested.

I truly appreciate all the posts I've received in this thread. Thank you all.

Here's my baby girl Beagle - Sara Lee. There's not two of her, she is looking into a mirror.
The origins of the Neanderthal are kind of complicated and, to be honest, probably not yet completely understood. From what I have read and seen in documentaries, homo sapiens and neanderthals split off from a common ancestor. This common ancestor could have traveled out of Africa and then become Homo sapiens neanderthalensis in Europe. The neanderthals and homo sapiens sapiens interbred, resulting in the passing of neanderthal genes to modern European and western Asian humans, which probably contained some advantages for surviving in that part of the world. This would explain why Africans do not have any neanderthal genes.

Anyway, this is my understanding of the genetic and biological history. If I am wrong, feel free to correct me.

P.S. Very cute girl you have there.
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Old 07-31-2013, 08:55 AM
 
Location: IN A COOKIE JAR
1,526 posts, read 1,274,706 times
Reputation: 1100
Quote:
Originally Posted by JennyMominRI View Post
I'm In school. I went back at 42. I'm Not even close to graduated so I'm no expert.
It just so happens that my most recent researc progject was on the use of DNA to prove gene flow .
I only mentioned that I did not see Celt on my DNA test because another poster had asked about it. No worries. I had assumed you were talking to someone else anyway.
As to why you (and I) have Asian DNA in small amounts. It likely because years ago, possibly many thousands humans made their way into Europe after have lived in Asia for many years. It's also posible there really was a random Asian ancestor somewhere.
You can take your raw DNA from whatever place tested it and upload it to GedCom. IT's free and they have all kinds of different DNA tests on there that you can do to get more specialized genetic info. IT's free too

Just saw your question on Neanderthals. They are an extinct species of the genus (Homo), very closely related to modern humans. They likely dveirged from a common ancestor around 400,000 years ago. They likely came from Homo Heidelbergensus . The African branch of this species evolved toward modern humans and the European branch evolved to be Neanderthals
Thank you, so that explains it. Two different branches of Homo Heidelbergensus, aka funny looking early human. Or do we have any idea of what they looked like? Maybe the Neanderthals, like you said, adapted differently than did the African branch.

And thanks I am going to have my DNA retested for a second opinion.
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Old 07-31-2013, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Eastwood, Orlando FL
1,260 posts, read 1,421,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GINGERSNAP1963 View Post
Thank you, so that explains it. Two different branches of Homo Heidelbergensus, aka funny looking early human. Or do we have any idea of what they looked like? Maybe the Neanderthals, like you said, adapted differently than did the African branch.

And thanks I am going to have my DNA retested for a second opinion.
And it's GedMatch not Gedcom. I always mix that up. They are not taking uploads until the 15th, But it's instant and free. They are just overloaded right now because everyone who had Ancesty.com dna done if uploading newly released raw data. There are some artists renderings of their appearence on the internet
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Old 07-31-2013, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,549,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GINGERSNAP1963 View Post
Thank you, so that explains it. Two different branches of Homo Heidelbergensus, aka funny looking early human. Or do we have any idea of what they looked like? Maybe the Neanderthals, like you said, adapted differently than did the African branch.

And thanks I am going to have my DNA retested for a second opinion.
It was assumed for a long time that we came from this simple and clean single line of development but with improved methods and often exploring what was brought back from digs of old and discared in the basement as 'junk' that we had many more sub-species than suspected and some of them interbred with homo sapiens.

There is a more primitive African subspecies which left traces in African people of today, but not Europeans, which suggests that multiple species existed much later than expected, and in the area now Sibera there were species which had died out other places including a subspecies of Neanderthal which lived much later than the first 'mixing' believed to be in what today is the middle east, as almost modern humans migrated out of African and interbred with their Neanderthan cousins. Some believe it was more wide spread other areas, due to the divergence of pass on gentics but this is still considered contriversal.
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Old 08-03-2013, 11:03 AM
 
277 posts, read 482,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Futuremauian View Post
I did the test through the Genographic Project with National Geographic Society, and was a bit underwhelmed by the results. My primary match was with the British Isles. I was not surprised since both sides of my family come from Scotland, and probably Ireland. My second closest match was to Germans. This was somewhat surprising, but could have come by way of German invasions in the British Isles.
The thing that underwhelmed me is that my dad is one-quarter Native American, and that didn't show up at all. (He even looks NA, with straight black hair and a darker complexion.) I'm still glad I did it, and will contribute what I know about my family to the Project, when I get around to it.
First you need to realize with DNA testing, it doesn't go according to what fractions of our ancestry we believe we are. Humans are 99% similar in the human genome. The regions being analyzed are loci where differences are found of allele frequency found different in population. This alleles are found in non-coding regions of the DNA. Because Native Americans are genetically similar among one another and very close with East Asians, this portion is pretty easily distinguished if you have a fullblood with 6/7 generations. With 23andMe it is common for Native Americans to show Native American w/East Asian.
This tends to be the case with people trying verify Native American ancestry, even with 23andMe, many people have oral stories with no clear genealogy, and BLAMM!! 100% European an no NA. How does one know their Native American ancestry was that Native American, they could have been highly mixed. Autosomal recombines every generation which is why detection for autosomal is 6/7 generations (5th great grandparent). DNA testing can be damaging to any identity one has about their family.

With that, the best on the market today, is 23andMe, it will report ancestry less than 1%. Geno has very limited SNP's. 23andMe has way more.

Anyway here is a product review. If you want the most bang for your buck, I'd start with 23andMe.
Autosomal DNA testing comparison chart - ISOGG Wiki

Last edited by AppalachianGumbo; 08-03-2013 at 11:12 AM..
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Old 08-03-2013, 01:01 PM
bjh
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
30,791 posts, read 23,791,826 times
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Anyone can try the different estimate on the % breakdown on 23andMe. The default is Standard. The Conservative shows populations with more certainty. The speculative shows a more open interpretation. I found the speculative matched my paper results better. Essentially it gives some identity to the Non-Specific DNA percentages.
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Old 08-04-2013, 12:44 PM
bjh
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
30,791 posts, read 23,791,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GINGERSNAP1963 View Post
Naw, it's in neither of those. I think it's only in 23andMe.com's site.

My father might have something in Ancestry. com so I'll ask him.
You can download your genome off of 23andMe and upload it to GEDmatch. I did.
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