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Old 01-07-2014, 03:18 PM
 
9,209 posts, read 18,049,326 times
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I found three possible "cover-ups" on my mom's side, in the same nuclear family.

My great-great grandfather (Charles) & grandmother (Maggie) had a total of 16 children. They had two different marriage dates recorded. The eldest daughter, Nellie, was born before one of those marriage dates. So they likely got started early.

Then later, the 6th daughter was born. I discovered that this girl was not born to Charles and Maggie, but to Nellie (overwhelming evidence in a church record when she had the baby girl baptized and the minister clearly wrote that Nellie was the mother, and "illegitimate" under "father.") Charles and Maggie evidently stood up with Nellie to have the girl baptized, as they were signed there as witnesses. Charles and Maggie went on to have more children, and just absorbed the little girl, their granddaughter, as one of their own daughters.

At one point, Charles moved the whole big family, including his in-laws, to the neighboring state, and he took a job doing exactly what he had been doing in their home town. The mill where he had worked in the home town was still open, so it's not like they moved for that reason. I couldn't understand why this whole big family just got up and moved across the state line, to what appeared to be a similar situation. I later found that a 16 year old girl down the road from them (in the original home town) gave birth to a baby boy, and she'd named Charles as the father in two separate records (and named the boy after him). This birth happened right before the family moved out of state. I can't definitely conclude that Charles, a married man with many kids, actually knocked-up this teenage girl, but there's a very strong correlation. They may have moved because he actually was the father and there was some negative opinion about that, or because this girl at least told the story that he was the father, and perhaps he wasn't.

From other things I learned about Charles, I'm inclined to believe he had a fling with the teenage girl. I actually think he had bipolar disorder. As you look through the documents that are evidence of his life, you can see roller-coaster ups and downs, and impulsivity. At one point, even though he was gainfully employed and financially stable, he decided to commit some high-risk burglaries, which made the newspapers in the early 1890s, when he was shot by a property owner and arrested (just a flesh wound). At the end of his life, he suddenly decided to move to the "wilderness" and become the live-in caretaker of a park. He extensively remodeled the house provided with the job (but which he did not own), and then accidentally shot himself in the stomach. He refused all attempts to help him, and he walked a couple miles to the nearest hospital, while bleeding, and insisted the whole time that he was fine. He died the next morning. This also made the local newspapers. I'm sure I'll be finding info about Charles for a long time.
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Old 01-08-2014, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
195 posts, read 579,672 times
Reputation: 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
I found three possible "cover-ups" on my mom's side, in the same nuclear family.

My great-great grandfather (Charles) & grandmother (Maggie) had a total of 16 children. They had two different marriage dates recorded. The eldest daughter, Nellie, was born before one of those marriage dates. So they likely got started early.

Then later, the 6th daughter was born. I discovered that this girl was not born to Charles and Maggie, but to Nellie (overwhelming evidence in a church record when she had the baby girl baptized and the minister clearly wrote that Nellie was the mother, and "illegitimate" under "father.") Charles and Maggie evidently stood up with Nellie to have the girl baptized, as they were signed there as witnesses. Charles and Maggie went on to have more children, and just absorbed the little girl, their granddaughter, as one of their own daughters.

At one point, Charles moved the whole big family, including his in-laws, to the neighboring state, and he took a job doing exactly what he had been doing in their home town. The mill where he had worked in the home town was still open, so it's not like they moved for that reason. I couldn't understand why this whole big family just got up and moved across the state line, to what appeared to be a similar situation. I later found that a 16 year old girl down the road from them (in the original home town) gave birth to a baby boy, and she'd named Charles as the father in two separate records (and named the boy after him). This birth happened right before the family moved out of state. I can't definitely conclude that Charles, a married man with many kids, actually knocked-up this teenage girl, but there's a very strong correlation. They may have moved because he actually was the father and there was some negative opinion about that, or because this girl at least told the story that he was the father, and perhaps he wasn't.

From other things I learned about Charles, I'm inclined to believe he had a fling with the teenage girl. I actually think he had bipolar disorder. As you look through the documents that are evidence of his life, you can see roller-coaster ups and downs, and impulsivity. At one point, even though he was gainfully employed and financially stable, he decided to commit some high-risk burglaries, which made the newspapers in the early 1890s, when he was shot by a property owner and arrested (just a flesh wound). At the end of his life, he suddenly decided to move to the "wilderness" and become the live-in caretaker of a park. He extensively remodeled the house provided with the job (but which he did not own), and then accidentally shot himself in the stomach. He refused all attempts to help him, and he walked a couple miles to the nearest hospital, while bleeding, and insisted the whole time that he was fine. He died the next morning. This also made the local newspapers. I'm sure I'll be finding info about Charles for a long time.
Wow, that sounds like a very conflicted person. I think you may be right about the bi-polar. One can only imagine the amount of untreated mental illness taking place back then.
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Old 01-12-2014, 07:36 PM
 
134 posts, read 121,200 times
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@TracySam: Your post, because it dealt with a young lady and because it was further back in the past, made me remember other controversies in my family tree that were well documented with court records at the time.

One of my Quaker immigrant ancestors, Robert Zane, impregnated one of his servants, Rebecca Hammond. Unfortunately, I do not have the Quaker Court book in front of me right now, and it's not accessible online at google or archive.org.

Just for illustration here is its summary page over at genealogical.com:

The Burlington Court Book : Genealogical Publishing Company

If you have Quaker ancestry in the US around this time, this is fascinating.

Back to my ancestor's story, though.

Here in a general genealogy book for family audiences, apparently, the account is extracted in the vaguest of ways, saying that the servant sued for clothing (NOT explaining that the clothing was for their CHILD.) It also talks about him giving her quite a lot of land, which would be totally inexplicable if you hadn't read the full account.

Extract

I have no idea what happened to this child, or to Rebecca Hammond after this ruling.

So, in this case, even though he was an ancestor to thousands, there was no mention of this child in family histories, no rumor or scandal, genealogically speaking. Someone would just have to stumble upon it in the Burlington Court Book, if he was just being thorough enough to check all the sources from where his ancestor lived.
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Old 01-13-2014, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,029 posts, read 1,155,547 times
Reputation: 1982
Some people have asked my why I continue looking for records even when I've verified that person A is the father of person B, and this is why....maybe they were also the father of X, Y or Z. Or I will find out other information about their lives that will tell me more about who they were than just that they lived and died.
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Old 01-14-2014, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 25,080,965 times
Reputation: 6183
Default It's not a game

I anyone is smart enough to do it, GENEALOGY - the family game - could be a lot of fun.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The trouble with genealogy is most of us do not have a clear path like a family bible. Instead I had a raft of letters showing where dad tried to prove his ancestor was raised in the Masonic Lodge by Paul Revere.

I had 3 Charlotte's who married 8 times. Charlotte #1 was the oldest. She married dad's paternal g.g.grandfather; they were parents of three boys and are buried in Ohio.

Charlotte #2 and #3 were mother and daughter from New York. Mother married three (3) times; her last husband was distant kin to my mother.

Daughter married four (4) times. Husband #3 was the son of Charlotte #1, and my dad's g.g. uncle Art. His nephew married the daughter of Charlotte #3 and had 12 children; she was dad's grandmother. Therefore #3, because of her marriage to Art, was the aunt to her natural daughter.

If this was not bad enough husband #4 was the man who dad was trying to prove in the first paragraph. I have the paperwork, talked to Lodge historian, and spent 10 years trying to sort it out. When it all done I realized he was not related; they didn't have children!

The work paid off. I met a woman who was this family historian. She told me for five years there was no connection. In the sixth year I found it. He was the descendant of a RW soldier who had 18 children; his father was the last child born. I accidentally found a missing branch in the Hubbard Family tree -- only because I was like a dog chasing its tail trying to sort the eight little women named Charlotte.

Aside: Husband #3 of Charlotte #2 was a descendant of my maternal Dutch family found in the Low Countries in 1550. He was the brother of my ancestor. They sailed from Holland in the 1600s to Niewe Amsterdam. It wasn't until 1700 the newly adopted family surname was legally used for the first time. The two brothers were actually known by four different second names. (Children born in Dutch families had no middle name prior to about 1800)

And for the first nine months that i did any research I was convinced I was my own grandpa! I was never interested as much in dates as I was how the families were related.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Fossil View Post
O.K. linicx, I concede the "game" 'cause you always come up with the good stuff because of your great in depth research . But closer to home; my Mother-in-Law's Father-in-Law was also her stepfather. Long story.
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Old 01-19-2014, 07:48 PM
 
8,096 posts, read 4,451,704 times
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my family came to united states area in 1640, but the surname i have is not the one they left the mother land wit, dna mach me with hundred of people with a different surname. exact match
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Old 01-20-2014, 09:39 AM
 
2,316 posts, read 1,905,622 times
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I found out that my mother had to get married because she was pregnant with me. Of course I was never told that. I always had a funny feeling something was up.

This fits a terrible stereotype, but here it goes. My parents are first cousins, and got married in a Catholic church.

The real proof was in the date
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Old 01-20-2014, 07:08 PM
 
Location: The Natural State
1,140 posts, read 1,173,015 times
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At the end of the Civil War when the slaves were freed, my g g grandfather stated in his Will that his maid "Sally" could have any five acres of his vast land she wanted, and implied if she wanted this five this year and that five next year and that five etc. it was her call. Hmmmm
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Old 01-20-2014, 07:13 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,237 posts, read 72,415,357 times
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i dont think they are called lies. i think the polite term is family fable vs family history. we lie to our kids. we dont want them to go to school and embarrass us. so we tell them we came over on the mayflower.
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Old 01-20-2014, 08:06 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,997 posts, read 17,150,498 times
Reputation: 30138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
i dont think they are called lies. i think the polite term is family fable vs family history. we lie to our kids. we dont want them to go to school and embarrass us. so we tell them we came over on the mayflower.
I'd say some are deliberate lies meant to mislead. Then there are also omissions. There's stretching of the truth to make themselves look better, all sorts of things. Mine was a case of omission that left me wondering why we were not allowed to ask.

We could not ask my grandfather why they came to this country. That was part of the reason why I HAD To FIND OUT. Turns out the story was just so very sad that of course no one should have asked him. I admire him more than ever knowing his story.
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