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Old 04-16-2014, 01:02 PM
 
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^^^FWIW

on the illegitimate thing, once I knew the bio family of my ggrandfather's father i went to court records and found where my gggrandmother had taken him to court. so i searched on his last name and found his whole name as defendent, her and the child.

that might work for your husband's line. don't know.

good luck
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Old 04-16-2014, 01:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
I already knew of an undocumented coupling in my husband's family tree prior to researching his family tree. Now I'm presented with a dead end since no record appears to exist for paternity of a great-grandparent. I haven't delved any further than that. Al involved are dead and gone.

Is there a birth certificate? Adoption papers?
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Old 04-16-2014, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
Why can't you ask who their biological father is? As long as you have explained that you are doing the geneaology research I don't see where it would be a problem. All they can do is tell you they don't want to discuss it, they don't know or it is none of your business. Then you thank them for their time and move on.
In the one instance, the way the person worded it made it obvious she didn't know who her father was...in the other, it's someone who isn't an actual relative but has a distant connection to our family (person I thought was her father was married to a deceased relative). The way she phrased it made it sound like she didn't want to discuss it any further so I wasn't going to press the issue.
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Old 04-16-2014, 04:28 PM
 
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Really only awkward moment was when I called my dad to let him know that our family tree had a twist in it. Had to tell him that his grandfather had spent time in the state pen. So that side of the family showed up in this country a few years before we thought it did. Instead of being an orphan like he claimed to be, it appears that his family disowned him for going to jail. Via Google downloading a bunch of old law libraries, I stumbled upon my great-grandfather's court case from the 1890's.
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Old 04-16-2014, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Kansas
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I am only dabbling in family research and they say that "dead men tell no tales" and that has proved to be wrong. I learned that my husband's grandfather indeed fathered a child two years before he married the mother (married to my husband's grandmother at the time of conception), in the olden days and that two of my relatives married the sister of their wife after their wives passed on which I found, well, icky. We also learned why some of his relatives just didn't remember or mention dates, names & places.
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Old 04-16-2014, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,497 posts, read 26,089,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnywhereElse View Post
I am only dabbling in family research and they say that "dead men tell no tales" and that has proved to be wrong. I learned that my husband's grandfather indeed fathered a child two years before he married the mother (married to my husband's grandmother at the time of conception), in the olden days and that two of my relatives married the sister of their wife after their wives passed on which I found, well, icky. We also learned why some of his relatives just didn't remember or mention dates, names & places.

For in-laws to wed after the death of their spouse/sibling was actually rather common, as was siblings marrying siblings. I was able to break down a brick wall after I realized a pair of sisters married a pair of brothers. The surname of one of the sisters had been misspelled in every single record I found for her.
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Old 04-16-2014, 07:02 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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My relatives all know for certain that our family is of German Lutheran ancestry and it is true...we are. But we actually come from an area that now is located in Poland, thanks to the outcome of WW-II and redrawn boundary lines. All of our family that we know of left Europe for the USA by 1882 and some were here before the Civil War. This was long before WW-II boundary changes and the only real change is that it is difficult to find records. When I found a birth registration for my dad's aunt showing she was born in Pommern, about 30 miles west of Gdansk, we finally had the village pinned down. When I shared the information all heck broke out. I explained about the Danzig/Gdansk history but nothing I could say would placate them...this proved we were Polish and they would have none of it. The family isn't very forthcoming with genealogical information anyway and this really put a cork in it. I don't share family history anymore unless they ask.

Last edited by SunGrins; 04-16-2014 at 07:32 PM.. Reason: update
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Old 04-16-2014, 07:24 PM
 
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My grandmother had some rather nasty things to say when I was growing up regarding those who tried to avoid service in Vietnam.

Courtesy of Ancestry.com, I learned her own father claimed he really couldn't serve because of his wife and child (my grandmother); he needed to support them.

So my great grandfather skipped out on WW1, so his daughter could bash those trying to get out of going to Vietnam.
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Old 04-16-2014, 07:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Yes, but....those dead people (or their records) can tell tales. My cousins reacted in icy fury - they no longer will communicate with me - when I discovered that one of our grtgrtgrandmother's would never have made it into the lady's auxiliary of the KKK.
Seems a bit of an over-reaction ...... what exactly are they upset about?
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Old 04-16-2014, 08:22 PM
 
Location: SLC, UT
1,571 posts, read 2,153,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minethatbird View Post
Seems a bit of an over-reaction ...... what exactly are they upset about?
The KKK are white supremacists. So it goes to follow that great great grandmother was not white.
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