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Old 08-04-2014, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,485 posts, read 26,089,700 times
Reputation: 26440

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
It's definitely a K, AUTOMOBILE CASK

Click on the certificate photo and then on your computer, down on the lower right part of your screen, click on 'change zoom level' and blow it up to 200% and it shows clearly a K.

Or go into your Menu and Tools and click on zoom 200%.
Did that. It still looks like an E to me.

I also Googled automobile casket and the only hits I got were for automobile themed caskets.

If I search automobile cask I get two newspaper articles which describe automobile cases in court:

Let me google that for you

The closest I found to automobile casket was casket coach.

Considering that the death certificate was signed by the coroner, automobile case makes the most sense: a coroner's legal case.
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Old 08-04-2014, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
38,677 posts, read 45,030,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Did that. It still looks like an E to me.

I also Googled automobile casket and the only hits I got were for automobile themed caskets.

If I search automobile cask I get two newspaper articles which describe automobile cases in court:

Let me google that for you

The closest I found to automobile casket was casket coach.

Considering that the death certificate was signed by the coroner, automobile case makes the most sense: a coroner's legal case.
I just returned from our monthly Genealogy meeting, at our Historical Society, and the unanimous consensus of the 9 members is that it is the letter K. If you blow it up and compare it with the letter E next to it in the word AUTOMOBILE you can definitely see the difference between the K & E. Check the 45 degree upward and downward strokes in the letter K and the straight across strokes in the letter E.
It also was mentioned that it may have been meant to be an E but whomever filled out the information may have been in a hurry and mistakenly wrote in the letter K. Only the original writer knows for sure.
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Old 08-05-2014, 08:58 AM
 
9,209 posts, read 18,043,938 times
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Wow! Thank you for taking my issue to other people for input!

I do believe it's "Cask" and since it was only 1919, I'm thinking that maybe not everyone had a funeral involving a hearse back then. So there were probably different caskets people could buy, and some were specially fitted for use in an automobile hearse. It had to be something that looked a little nicer than a wooden box, and it probably had some different handles for getting it in and out, etc. so they probably had that stamp made with "Automobile Cask" to identify what the body was being placed in.

Thanks everyone. Martin died of Valvular Heart Disease and Joseph died of "Probable General Injuries" with no identified cause.
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Old 08-05-2014, 11:54 AM
 
1,176 posts, read 1,897,075 times
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My guesses:

Valvular heart disease

Probable head injuries

I also support the "Automobile Case" hypothesis.
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Old 08-05-2014, 05:28 PM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,813 posts, read 4,311,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleonidas View Post
My guesses:

Valvular heart disease

Probable head injuries

I also support the "Automobile Case" hypothesis.
I agree. You have to remember that cars weren't everywhere like today. There wasn't standard terminology like "car accident", "wreck", "crash", etc. So I think "automobile casE" was a way to categorize the associated cause of death. Probably starting to happen on such a regular basis, they even made up a rubber stamp.
And when have you ever seen the deceased's disposition (casket, coffin, urn, cremation, "auto cask") put on a Death Certificate!?
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Old 08-05-2014, 06:37 PM
 
9,209 posts, read 18,043,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellpaso View Post
And when have you ever seen the deceased's disposition (casket, coffin, urn, cremation, "auto cask") put on a Death Certificate!?
A lot of the death certs I have do include info about the disposition of the remains, the cemetery address and name of the undertaker for instance.
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Old 08-05-2014, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,485 posts, read 26,089,700 times
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Yeah, but the body is not put into the casket until the mortician is finished with it. Transfer from the hospital to the mortician is usually on a stretcher or gurney, not in the actual burial casket.
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Old 08-05-2014, 10:07 PM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,813 posts, read 4,311,765 times
Reputation: 5796
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Yeah, but the body is not put into the casket until the mortician is finished with it. Transfer from the hospital to the mortician is usually on a stretcher or gurney, not in the actual burial casket.
^^exactly!
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Old 08-06-2014, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,358 posts, read 13,015,780 times
Reputation: 14063
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
Here's another Philadelphia ancestor, Joseph Kolb, whose cause of death I can't read:




It looks like "probable G--- injuries" but I can't figure out that word with the G. Gut? Groin? Gun?
Thanks to anyone who might be able to figure this out.
It looked like it read: Probable Genl. (general) injuries. The stamp indicated it was an automobile case; whatever happened involved a car, and car accidents bust their victims up. If an autopsy was done, it would have given the specifics as to what killed your ancestor. A death certificate probably didn't need to be as specific.
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Old 08-06-2014, 05:46 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,701 posts, read 3,992,906 times
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FWIW, here are my current thoughts. Did the coroner's office send out it's wagon for pick ups? Probably. Is there a difference between a coroner's wagon and the (then) recently introduced "automobile casket wagon"? Even today I hear the term "the coroner sent out a wagon to pick up the body". However, what I once saw as a K, I can now see why it's probably a smeared E.

The deceased may have been a pedestrian. I have a great? uncle who sustained fatal injuries when he was hit by an auto in Philadelphia. His death certificate, in the late 1930's, was stamped Inquest and the coroner's office later noted that the driver of the vehicle was found "not guilty" and thus his death was ruled accidental. I have noticed that most, if not all, of my PA relatives' death certificates have a hand written number scribbled on the certificate, and I'm guessing the number referred to a code for statistical record keeping.

Back then, there were a LOT of car accidents. No traffic lights, no stop signs, poor steering, poor brakes, etc. I recently found several Baltimore newspapers from the 1930's while in my attic and was initially surprised to see the number of pedestrian involved car accidents mentioned in the papers.

Anyway, when looked at within the historical context, it makes sense that there would be a special stamp indicating "automobile case" given the (then) recent introduction of cars and the government's "need" to monitor causes of death.
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