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Old 12-07-2017, 10:15 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,633 posts, read 2,584,294 times
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I’m actually surprised at the number of people with Huguenot ancestors. Mine were in New Paltz, NY. They assimilated pretty quickly into the majority populations because they couldn’t get proper clergy sent over from Europe. There’s only one Huguenot church that I know of. Once they switched over to a new religious group they had to give up their language and the thing that set them apart from the common herd. The 3rd amendment concerning the quartering of soldiers in homes at least partially connects back to the cultural memory of the Huguenot persecution in France.
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Old 12-10-2017, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Colorado
79 posts, read 42,274 times
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Originally Posted by RDM66 View Post
I have been holding off on DNA testing, but it wouldn't shock me at all if I have some Native American ancestry.

My grandmother's family was French-Canadian and lived in Quebec from the early 1600s to about 1700, when they finally hopped over the border and became Americans.

When the French colonized Quebec, they did not allow any women to immigrate. (It was men only). The rugged frontier with its many dangers was no place for a woman, the chivalrous French thought. As a consequence, there was a lot of intermarriage between the early Frenchmen of Quebec and Native American woman. --They were the only women in Quebec.

Later the French reconsidered their flaw logic and allowed French women to immigrate to Quebec. (You cannot sustain a society without women. Duh! ) Of course, there was a lot of racist claptrap back in France about how the Frenchmen in Quebec were turning into savages because they were all marrying Indian women. The French solved the problem by sweeping the streets of Paris of undesirable, low-class women and shipping them off to Quebec as mail-order brides.
I haven’t done testing yet either, though I would expect the results to show primarily a mix of western and northern European. We did have a family rumor of a part-Indian great-grandmother, which turned out to be a bit true, though that ‘part’ was very, very small.

I have family from Quebec, and have found that existing genealogical documentation for people descending from French immigrants of the 17th century is pretty extensive. What I found is that a couple of ancestors from the late 1600’s had Indian names, several others sprinkled though the family tree were identified as Metis, and at least a dozen immigrant women were Filles du Roi, which I suspect were those undesirables from the streets of Paris.

The Indian ancestors are so far back in time, that they would account for less than one percent of my family’s genetic ancestry. Don’t even know if that shows up in test results.
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Old 12-14-2017, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Penobscot Bay, the best place in Maine!
1,891 posts, read 5,075,093 times
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Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Back in the 1960s, my brother in law’s father had an electrical contracting business. The family lore was Indian Ancestry, but since the females back in the 1600 and 1700s were not named in censuses or other records, it was never provable. It would have given them special consideration in getting contracts.

Recently, someone did get confirmation through dna, but it doesn’t matter now.
How so? If the Native ancestor was further back than their grandparent or great-grandparent, they would not be eligible for services and programs designated to benefit Natives.
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Old 12-14-2017, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Penobscot Bay, the best place in Maine!
1,891 posts, read 5,075,093 times
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Originally Posted by BrassTacksGal View Post
Ok, why does everyone think it's cool to have Native American ancestors? Why not some other kind of ancestor? I dunno, maybe a King or President or a Scotch-Irish fighter or horse thieves? How about a Japanese Princess? A famous singer? A french man who wrote poetry? A silversmith in Boston? A colonist who fought to bring our country to fruition? Why only Native Americans, some of whom were violent and brutal? I'm really curious.
You have completely bought into a stereotype. The Native Americans were no more brutal or violent that the European settlers were. Why do people have such stories in their family lore? I have no idea. But I do know that the *stereotype* of the Native American as a violent and undesirable being...really needs to be corrected.
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Old 12-14-2017, 10:58 AM
 
460 posts, read 261,712 times
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Originally Posted by BrassTacksGal View Post
Why only Native Americans, some of whom were violent and brutal? I'm really curious.
Wow !!!....I am 25% Native American and I find very offensive your post.
I guess you forgot the GENOCIDE of Native Americans in North America: The Trail of Tears, the Sand Creek Massacre, and many, many other.

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Old 12-14-2017, 03:17 PM
 
13,604 posts, read 6,619,910 times
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Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
And that 1% could be an error. I don't think I'd take much stock in a 1% of something on a DNA test. I have a much larger percentage of Native American but don't regard it as "my culture" because I have no ties with it, and know nothing about my ancestors tribes.
I don't think it's an error. I have relatives who are 1-3% native American and we have documented native ancestry, but it is from hundreds of years ago (1700s) so it makes sense that they have the small amount that they do.

Many black Americans have very deep roots in this country like my own family and during the late 17th and 18th centuries, natives, whites/Europeans, and black/Africans all had populations held in some sort of bondage and there was some intermixing in the early colonies that does show up in DNA results.
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Old 12-14-2017, 04:40 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
15,542 posts, read 4,709,735 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrassTacksGal View Post
Ok, why does everyone think it's cool to have Native American ancestors? Why not some other kind of ancestor? I dunno, maybe a King or President or a Scotch-Irish fighter or horse thieves? How about a Japanese Princess? A famous singer? A french man who wrote poetry? A silversmith in Boston? A colonist who fought to bring our country to fruition? Why only Native Americans, some of whom were violent and brutal? I'm really curious.
I think that to be related, even distantly, to anyone who has achieved greatness - no matter what their ethnicity - is pretty cool. Violence and brutality are, unfortunately, a part of American history that we can't erase. At least two of my ancestors that I know of committed suicide. I'm not proud of that, but I think knowing unpleasant facts about our family history can sometimes be helpful. For example, my ancestor's suicides might explain my own lifelong tendency toward depression.
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Old 12-14-2017, 06:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pandorafan5687 View Post
I have not seen blacks dressing in a stereotypical Native American fashion, but I do hear the claims of Cherokee quite often. There was a comedian on ComicView that once said that everyone want's to be black except for blacks themselves. Many blacks will claim to be part Indian, Hawaiian, Portuguese, etc, etc, etc.
I socialize in real life and online with a lot of black genealogy groups/circles and a pretty substantial amount of the participants online especially actually do try to "re-learn" their "culture" from a native perspective and they go to pow wows and dress like Indians.

I agree that many black people try to claim to be something else other than black. It is sad to me, those people. I'm also amazed at how people think the "Cherokee" were all over the USA lol.
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Old 12-14-2017, 06:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Alandros View Post

This does seem to be a thing for both Black and White Americans. It's interesting.

I will say that these sorts of things get complicated though. I used to be pretty critical of these sorts of things, but I think about it a bit differently now.

For example many people carry the surname of an ancestor they might share far less than 1% of their DNA from. They may even embrace some sort of culture from it, say if it's Irish, Scottish, French, etc. How is this single ancestor any more important than say a Native ancestor who lived around the time of that ancestor.

Likewise many people embrace specific ancestors they have information of... say a war hero, a rebel, someone who accomplished a lot, etc. Sometimes 200+ years ago. Or say an immigrant ancestor for their hardships or their achievements, etc.

A lot of Irish-Americans, Scottish-Americans, German-Americans seem to embrace the root culture of a specific immigrant ancestor... Again sometimes via surname or just because it happens to be known. How is a small cluster of Native ancestors any less valid to embrace than say German ones, or even African ones.

With that said, I know exactly what you mean, someone who is completely foreign to a culture of their distant ancestors and suddenly converts fully to it seemingly in basically a patronizing sort of way. It's almost a toy to them and that certainly can demean the culture they reference.

With that said I think there's a very valid way to pursue an ancestors culture, to remain respectful to both it and the fact you weren't raised or part of it.

In the end our ancestors were individuals and how is any one less or more important than another just because it may be fewer in number compared to other ancestors? I don't know, it gets complicated. If I go to England and can find where my Langley ancestor came from where I got my name is that any different than finding what tribe a Native ancestor from this same time period came from and visiting it, maybe picking up an English hat and a Native hat... Again not defending people who take it way too far and patronize it, but I do think it gets over-dismissed on the other end sometimes.
On this, I don't think there is any problem with people acknowledging and learning more about their ancestors. But to see a 1-2% of something and then automatically start claiming some new culture that you were not reared in, is very strange to me.

One of my grandfathers cousins took an ancestry DNA test and she is 4% Native. However, she was raised as a black American and reared with a black American culture. It would be very silly of her to all of a sudden claim to be a native American and start wearing feathers and going to pow wows. I also think that people trivialize and stereotype indigenous cultures by engaging in these events in order to "learn their culture" when most of these people are descendants of indigenous populations of the Carolinas and Virginia and I doubt all of them engaged in the same sorts of cultural celebrations that western native populations engaged in.

I have tried my best to learn about the indigenous background of my own family tree, but I would never claim a culture or socio-racial identity that is not my own. Black Americans are a mixture of various cultures of African, Europe, and the indigenous Americas amongst others. That is a part of being black in America - having a diverse gene pool. To me it is disrespectful to ignore the culture you were reared in and seek to adopt another. IMO we should learn and appreciate all the persons we are reviewing in our family history and the places they lived/came from. The stories and histories and learning of them are what is interesting to me about genealogy.
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Old 12-14-2017, 11:57 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,357 posts, read 15,841,471 times
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Originally Posted by ozarknation View Post
Wow !!!....I am 25% Native American and I find very offensive your post.
I guess you forgot the GENOCIDE of Native Americans in North America: The Trail of Tears, the Sand Creek Massacre, and many, many other.

Sadly, some Native Americans were violent and brutal. As were some Europeans, some Asians, some Africans, and basically some of every people on earth.

Vilolence and brutality is a mark of humanity.

Fortunately, in the long run, good people tend to prevail.
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