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Old 03-04-2016, 01:54 PM
 
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Traced my genealogy to Jamestown, with no known Native American ancestor. However DNA testing on my fathers side it shows up. There had been rumors in the family, but I always thought it was just nonsense. I think it's pretty cool.

I once had a dentist ask if I had Native American blood because of my teeth. Not sure what that means though. Interesting.
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Old 03-04-2016, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
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Several of my family lines came to Massachusetts colony in the 1630's, one shows up at Plymouth in 1621.
My family has been west of the Mississippi since 1810, and one 49er (Mother's side), that went to California during the rush, and was one of the few to go back home to Kentucky to get his wife and 11 kids, and move to Indiana a few years before the Civil War, but 2 of those kids who served in the Union Calvary, were captured and died at Andersonville Ga.


In the early days, many of my G-whatever grandmothers, (Father's side), came directly from England. The prospective groom would make a pilgrimage back there and marry and bring his new wife to the new world. This was a custom for several generations.


The last was my Great-Great Grandmother who came to the US, (Montana) in the 1870s, had 4 kids and skedaddled back to merry Olde England because Montana was too cold. The kids stayed here with their father


No Indian, African or Asian blood has ever shown up in any DNA tests I've ever had.


Since one set of my mother's Grandparents came from Norway, I do have a LOT of Northern European and Nordic blood.
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Old 03-04-2016, 03:50 PM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Originally Posted by xboxmas View Post
I hear it wasn't uncommon for marriages to happen between someone who was white and the other being Native American. Obviously not every white person married a Native American, but it's always possible they married someone who was a 1/4 Native American for example. How likely are you to have even a tiny bit of Native American blood if you are descended from colonists?
Certainly not. Back then Northern Europeans wouldn't have relations to "savages", which they were referred to back then. Obviously, as people reflect on all of this, the term doesn't fit to say the least.
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Old 03-04-2016, 03:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Disgustedman View Post
Personally there's never been a "Native" american. They came from up north (Land bridge) and thus began to populate the north american continent.

That being said there's some mixing of races (via kidnapping and assimilation into the tribe) Quanah Parker is an example. His mother was taken a nine in a raid, assimilated into the tribe and gave birth to him.

Many other examples exist...
"Native" = there first. We all came from Africa (or Pangea) if you go back far enough.
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Old 03-04-2016, 03:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gg View Post
Certainly not. Back then Northern Europeans wouldn't have relations to "savages", which they were referred to back then. Obviously, as people reflect on all of this, the term doesn't fit to say the least.
English settlers were unlikely to marry indigenous people, because they were usually at war. French, Portuguese, and eventually Spanish settlers certainly did marry indigenous people. In early French marriage records, the word "sauvage" was used to indicate an indigenous bride, or groom, or wedding witness.
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Old 03-04-2016, 05:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Meyerland View Post
Traced my genealogy to Jamestown, with no known Native American ancestor. However DNA testing on my fathers side it shows up. There had been rumors in the family, but I always thought it was just nonsense. I think it's pretty cool.

I once had a dentist ask if I had Native American blood because of my teeth. Not sure what that means though. Interesting.
There is a distinctive shape of the teeth associated with Native Americans, called 'shovel' shape of the four upper central incisors...
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Old 03-04-2016, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
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Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I think if more people in places like Quebec get their DNA tested, the traces of Native American blood would show up. Or maybe it wouldn't--these raids took place in the late 1600s, early 1700s--would it show up in DNA tests that long ago?
It could, but it is not a given due to the random nature of DNA inheritance. I think that many Americans who show very small amounts of native DNA had that ancestry from the time of first contact between Natives and Europeans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
(To answer the previous question, possibly white people who live in Quebec do have some Native American blood mixed in with the blood of colonial New Englanders who were captured long ago. It's also possible that white people living in the very northern reaches of Maine, VT, and NH could have some Native blood since they live so close to the Canadian border. In the early 18th C.my own family lived in northern VT and sometimes Quebec--the national boundaries shifted all the time--but I have no Native American names and I can trace each family back to where they came from. Yet we have the myth of the Native American ancestor. I don't think many Native Americans survived in this part of the country--they would have died off in wars or from smallpox or married into white families later on. It would be interesting to know what happened to the few that were left.)
My maternal grandmother and her ancestors going back a couple of generations were born in Quebec (mostly near Granby), but they were from a community of Loyalist families originally from colonial New Hampshire and Maine, not French. Many thousands of New Englanders were granted land in Canada for farming after the Revolution.
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Old 03-04-2016, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
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Originally Posted by mic111 View Post
That is very interesting. 30% is very high to have no knowledge. It is a percent you would expect if there was an almost full blooded parent or a full blooded grandparent and another partial grand parent. Is there a chance he is adopted or has a different parent than what he is told? Getting his other relatives tested could be very interesting.
This is typical in New Mexico Hispanics. The small founding population by the time they came up from Mexico was probably already mestizo -- mixed indigenous/European -- and then as they forcibly converted New Mexico tribes to Catholicism they intermarried with them and in many cases the tribal identity was erased.
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Old 03-04-2016, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
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Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
If we're talking about the thirteen original colonies, intermarriage was actually illegal for the most part. It gets complicated but there was some intermarriage between blacks and Native Americans--because Native American men were killed off in the numerous wars with Whites. There was a shortage of Native American men. You could find blacks intermarried with Native Americans and living with them and in very early days you could find a few white fur traders married and living with the Native Americans, reason being that they wanted to solidify their fur trading ambitions.

What ever became of these families? How would their descendants self identify today?
Interracial marriage was not outlawed by colonies until 1660 and later, when slavery became racialized. In the rural South especially there was also interracial concubinage long after, and a large population of racially mixed people resulting from all kinds of combinations of free and enslaved blacks and free Europeans and indentured servants.

Many descendants today have no idea of their past and many (like myself) are only finding out about it now because DNA testing has revealed secrets of the past which motivates us to do more research.
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Old 03-04-2016, 06:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
Interracial marriage was not outlawed by colonies until 1660 and later, when slavery became racialized. In the rural South especially there was also interracial concubinage long after, and a large population of racially mixed people resulting from all kinds of combinations of free and enslaved blacks and free Europeans and indentured servants.

Many descendants today have no idea of their past and many (like myself) are only finding out about it now because DNA testing has revealed secrets of the past which motivates us to do more research.
Exactly - it's not like prohibitions against interracial marriage had any effect on race mixing (having sex). Just watch Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates on PBS - almost every black American has one or more white ancestors.
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