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Old 01-05-2018, 04:53 PM
 
172 posts, read 67,107 times
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Ok. I understand now. Just imagining 500 or so years of 98% Ashkenazi ethnicity is kind of mind boggling.
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Old 01-05-2018, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,216 posts, read 12,800,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piperdiva View Post
Ok. I understand now. Just imagining 500 or so years of 98% Ashkenazi ethnicity is kind of mind boggling.
Ashkenazi are very endogamous, so it's quite common.
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Old 01-09-2018, 07:12 AM
 
172 posts, read 67,107 times
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Funny thread derail: I joked with my husband that I should write a book entitled "Eat Right for Your Haplotype" and make millions. 23andMe beat me to it, if the Facebook ads on my feed are correct.
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Old 01-09-2018, 11:23 AM
 
1,800 posts, read 730,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blueskoo View Post
My grandmother's family swore that their paternal grandfather was white and Cherokee but passed as black and married a black woman and their maternal grandmother was also largely Cherokee. Despite being a visibly, predominantly Black family, let them tell it they are mostly white and Cherokee with some black. One relative even claimed to be able to trace some ancestors to the Trail of Tears.

The eldest male in the family, my great-uncle, took a DNA test that came back 60% Sub Saharan African, 40% European, and 0% Native American.

Paper trail list both the white/Cherokee grandparent and the black/Cherokee grandparent as being "Mulattoes" with Black/Mulatto parents
This is a common theme in black families. In the south, mulattos were called "Indian" if they had racially ambiguous looks.

I completely destroyed my mother's Indian grandmother myth.

She used to brag about how her grandmother, a fair-skinned woman, was "mostly Indian" and how she loved to braid her long strait hair. I looked up the records her grandmother's family had all been slaves in Texas who were recorded as "mulatto" in records between 1870 and 1920.

Then my mother claimed that Indians were recorded as mulatto in the census, a dubious claim that a lot of people make.

Finally my mother recently got a DNA test, she's not one iota Indian, but 26% European.
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Old 02-27-2018, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
539 posts, read 164,263 times
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My AncestryDNA Results:

33% Europe West
26% Ireland/Scotland/Wales
10% Iberian Peninsula
8% Scandinavia
7% Europe East
5% European Jewish
4% Europe South
2% Great Britain
1% Finland/Northwest Russia
2% Asia South
1% Caucasus
<1% Middle East

Matches:
Paternal Grandfather (Dad's Father): Extremely High
Paternal Grandmother (Dad's Mother): Extremely High
Paternal Aunt (Dad's Half Sister): Extremely High
Maternal Great Aunt (Mom's Mom's Sister): Extremely High
Maternal Second Cousin (Mother's First Cousin): Extremely High
Paternal Great Aunt (Paternal Grandfather's Mother's Sister): Extremely High
Maternal Third Cousin (Mother's Second Cousin): Extremely High
Maternal Third Cousin (Mother's Second Cousin): Extremely High
Paternal Third Cousin (Father's Second Cousin): Extremely High
Paternal Fourth Cousin (Father's Third Cousin): Extremely High.


I have a lot of family who took that test lolololol. But at least there is no denying who my parents, grandparents, great grandparents, and great great grandparents are.
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Old 02-27-2018, 03:21 PM
 
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I was mainly amused. I don't know who my biological father is due to my parents using a sperm donor. I always assumed that I was of Jewish descent through my bio dad - a lot of people have just assumed that I was despite my decidedly WASP-y name. I also would not have been surprised to have some African ancestry.

But nope. I'm like superwhite. There's like 1/10 of 1 percent that is Sub-Saharan African and 1/10 of 1 percent that comes from an obscure Turkic people. The rest is almost entirely French/German, with a sprinkling of Scandinavian. I thought that was hysterically funny for some reason, just because so many people had made various assertions over the years of what I am ethnically.
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Old 02-27-2018, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,216 posts, read 12,800,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piperdiva View Post
Funny thread derail: I joked with my husband that I should write a book entitled "Eat Right for Your Haplotype" and make millions. 23andMe beat me to it, if the Facebook ads on my feed are correct.
Lots of companies offer nutritional advice based on DNA, but it's got nothing to do with your haplogroup.
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Old 03-03-2018, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Floribama
13,483 posts, read 29,425,055 times
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Count me as another who was always told I had Cherokee ancestry, but my results showed NONE.

34% Ireland/Scotland/Wales

30% Great Britain

22% Europe West

4% Europe East

2% Scandinavia

2% Finland/Northwest Russia

2% Europe South

2% Iberian Peninsula

<1% Senegal

<1% Africa South
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Old 03-05-2018, 11:08 AM
 
14,375 posts, read 7,085,168 times
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I was not disappointed because I didn't really expect much of anything from it really. My grandfather tested as well and now I know for sure he is biologically connected to me. My mom and he don't always get along and she was hoping it would turn up that he wasn't her dad (because she is weird, they have a weird relationship lol).

I thought it was interesting that I have a lot of ancestry from various different places and that mine and my grandfather's is really different.

20% Ivory Coast/Ghana
19% Cameroon/Congo
19% Ireland/Scotland/Wales
14% Nigeria
11% Benin/Togo
4% Europe South
3% Mali
2% Senegal
1% AFrican Central
1% Africa North
1% African Bantu
1% Middle East
1% Finland
<1% Melanesia
<1% Asia South
<1% Scandinavia

I thought it interesting that my grandfather was only 2% Irish but was 18% "Great Britain." He is my maternal grandfather and my maternal grandmother has some known Irish ancestry as does my paternal great grandmother so I figure I got a lot of Irish from a couple different members of my family, not him though.

So I just thought it was interesting but honestly don't feel like the ethnicity piece provides much information and thought that without testing a bunch of people, it is difficult to use the DNA test to help with research. Luckily I did my grandfather's and mine at the same time. One of my maternal aunts refused to do it at the last minute, she is my grandmother's sister (grandmother is passed away)
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Old 06-22-2018, 08:50 PM
 
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Default I found mine to be very interesting

I immediately matched up with my parents according to Ancestry.com, which was a relief! LOL
I knew we had Native American in our family, my mom showed NAm but I didn't???
However, I had several things that neither parent had, Middle East, Asia Central, and some other traces less than 1%. After reading some interesting articles on the DNA markers that were used in place of NAm for Cherokee. The DNA used to identify Cherokee is Middle East/Northern Africa and a trace of Asiatic. That DNA mixture is stronger than just NAm classification, it indicates full blooded Cherokee.
We always talked about getting this done, but a cousin wanted to compare her DNA with my father's, because her father (my uncle) was deceased and her DNA showed no German, which my father's came back at over 40% German, then Great Britain, then Scandinavian, with traces of I P, Irish/Scotish. She knows that her one brother (now deceased) is a half-brother and she thought that her other brother was a genetic match, but it really bothers her not knowing. So I guess that some people will find out the real truth about their parents, even though they are deceased. I will be making a trip to visit her personally with the results so that I can help her deal with this finding. All she really needs to know is that her mom and dad really loved her and gave her everything she needed to become a successful individual.
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