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Old 02-27-2017, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna.
11,366 posts, read 6,786,875 times
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On the Western edge of Columbia County, Pennsylvania, and about eight miles north of the North Branch of the Susquehanna River, lies the unincorporated village of Jerseytown -- (pop approx. 175); the little crossroads draws its name from the fact that the German immigrants who settled there after the failed Revolution of 1848 toiled in New Jersey for some time in order to pay for their passage.

Prominent within that group were the six Schultz brothers, who anglicized their name by dropping the 'c'; boys apparently ran in the family, since there were about a column and a half of 'Sh'-Shultzes in the local phone book when I was growing up. The brothers, like most Germans who had lost fathers, brothers, uncles and cousins at places with names like Austerlitz and Jena during the Napoleanic wars, didn't have much enthusiasm for the Civil War effort, and probably supported, if they did not directly participate in what came to be called the "Fishing Creek Confederacy".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fishing_Creek_Confederacy

If the stories handed down from my ancestors are accurate, I'm a descendent of the youngest of the S(c)hultz brothers, who also built the Jerseytown Hotel, which still stands. But that gentleman also moved to the western periphery of neighboring Luzerne County, where he married into the family of a Civil War veteran, who endowed him with a farm which family members operated for over one hundred years, and is still in operation by another family.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 02-27-2017 at 09:28 PM..
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Old 02-27-2017, 09:43 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,988 posts, read 17,140,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
I have numerous ancestors who were the first white settlers of the New Hampshire coast, and there is still much debate today about the connection between these first settlements and the towns along the coast today such as Portsmouth (originally Strawbery Banke) and Rye (formerly Sandy Beach), which were renamed and/or changed boundaries in the first hundred years of settlement. Some of the first settlements were temporary; what we think of as "towns" came later as the population grew.
Although I've read every post, this is the only one that I am fairly familiar with--what a fascinating area!
Portsmouth is gorgeous and real destination city now. The Strawbery Banke Museum there is very interesting too. And the bridge over the Piscatagua River is quite a sight along with wonderful Prescott Park. Rye, of course is an absolutely beautiful coastal town. New Hampshire may only have nineteen miles of coast but what a coast!

Welcome to Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth NH

Same with so many of these early settlements, at least in northern New England. Our ancestors fought their way through forests and established tiny settlements which were later renamed or incorporated into other towns. I think Portsmouth's been there a long time--I have someone married in Portsmouth pre-Revolutionary. Of course, it wouldn't have been very much like the Portsmouth we know today.
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Old 02-27-2017, 10:32 PM
 
Location: One of the 13 original colonies.
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My 9th great grandfather was among the first to settle Hartford Conn and another 8th great grandfather was in the first group to settle Charleston, SC
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Old 02-27-2017, 11:40 PM
 
Location: WA
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One of my ancestors was Andries Luycaszen who with the Dutch West India company in 1623 when they founded the first trading post on Manhattan. He was reportedly a guide and interpreter for Peter Minuit, governer of the Dutch West India Company, when he famously bought Manhattan Island from the original inhabitants for 60 guilders.

Does that count?
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Old 02-28-2017, 02:35 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
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John Mohr (Big) Mackintosh, landed near Darien, GA in February 1736. Mackintosh County is named after the family, whose roots were in Inverness, Scotland where the clan was solidly Jacobite.

My step-father's Sawyer family arrived in New England in 1636.

Last edited by Frihed89; 02-28-2017 at 02:44 AM..
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Old 02-28-2017, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Pahrump, NV
2,064 posts, read 2,737,123 times
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my family founded gold hill, oregon. the orignial family homestead is still standing, altho the land it sits on has shrunk a bit over the years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold_Hill,_Oregon
City of Gold Hill - Home
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Old 02-28-2017, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Proxima Centauri
3,754 posts, read 1,592,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
James Rogers b1706?
Founder of Dunbarton NH
Wikipedia identifies James Rogers as the father of Robert Rogers. Robert Rogers was the famous head of Rogers Rangers during the French and Indian War.

Was the James Rogers in your post and the father of Robert Rogers one and the same?
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Old 02-28-2017, 08:37 AM
 
Location: MN
2,737 posts, read 2,574,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty011 View Post
My 9th great grandfather was among the first to settle Hartford Conn and another 8th great grandfather was in the first group to settle Charleston, SC
My 9th great grandfather was also in the Hartford group! There's a mountain, and lake also named after him. He owned the land where Harvard is now, and the charter oak was on his land. We had a large family reunion 30 yrs ago, where tons of info was put together for everyone, was pretty cool. Another relative was hung in Salem Witch Trials, guess we have a witch!
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Old 02-28-2017, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
2,955 posts, read 4,509,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Although I've read every post, this is the only one that I am fairly familiar with--what a fascinating area!
Portsmouth is gorgeous and real destination city now. The Strawbery Banke Museum there is very interesting too. And the bridge over the Piscatagua River is quite a sight along with wonderful Prescott Park. Rye, of course is an absolutely beautiful coastal town. New Hampshire may only have nineteen miles of coast but what a coast!

Welcome to Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth NH

Same with so many of these early settlements, at least in northern New England. Our ancestors fought their way through forests and established tiny settlements which were later renamed or incorporated into other towns. I think Portsmouth's been there a long time--I have someone married in Portsmouth pre-Revolutionary. Of course, it wouldn't have been very much like the Portsmouth we know today.
I have lived in western NH, and in Maine and Boston, but that was in the days before I studied genealogy. No clue my ancestors were from the NH coast area. I only drove through on I-95 without stopping. If I ever get back to the area I'd like to see Portsmouth for sure. It seems like a large proportion of the population of northern New England descends from those first NH settlers, especially William Berry and Jane (my 7th ggp a couple of ways). They had first dibs on the gene pool.
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Old 02-28-2017, 10:42 AM
Status: "In a Mayberry Town in the Mitten..." (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,040 posts, read 6,972,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by residinghere2007 View Post
Cool!

My 3rd great grandparents lived in Fulton County in the 1870s-1880s. They were the only black family in the entire county and lived in the Swan Creek Village area.

FWIW Fulton County had a lot of Underground Railroad activity. And the area is pretty nice. I live in the Toledo area of NW Ohio.
Wow, that's cool too!

Would Swan Creek Village be somewhere around Swanton? I have heard of Swanton, Swan Creek Township, and Swan Creek itself (body of water), but never Swan Creek Village. That's interesting.

Growing up in Wauseon, there were a few houses in the community that were known to have been stops on the Underground Railroad, and I believe they are still standing. One is a big, brick farmhouse on State Route 108 just south of Wauseon.

I have a great-great-grandfather who grew up in Fulton County and was a Lincoln Republican active in Abolitionist causes and several Ohio infantry regiments in the Civil War while his brother, who lived in Sandusky, was a Copperhead Democrat who published a newspaper that supported surrendering and allowing the Confederate states to leave the union and endorsed McClellen in the 1864 Presidential election.

I wonder how often they got together to fight about politics, lol.
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