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Old 03-01-2017, 04:59 PM
 
Location: 23.7 million to 162 million miles North of Venus
5,201 posts, read 4,777,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Interesting! Do you live around Ipswich? Another town that's big on history with several old cemeteries and a street with more first period houses than any town in the entire country! Oldest working farm in the USA too. (Appleton Farms, 1636.)
No, I've never been to MA. My uncle had gone to visit and had taken pictures of the old building, along with pictures of street signs that bear our current surname. I can't remember offhand what town(s) in MA those street signs are located.

He'd sent me a cd with all of his research on it, including those and other pictures. But with about 850 years of family tree data and pics on it, it is really too much for my rinky-dink computer to handle without seriously bogging down.
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Old 03-01-2017, 05:35 PM
 
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Our family homeplace was in western NC, one of the first in that area. I remember loving to go visit when I was a child. My particular branch of the family moved into upstate SC late 1800s (someone mentioned Whitmire, yep been through there many times). Still have a wide extended family living there as well, though all from dad's sisters. All the brothers went into the armed forces and dad was the only one to return to the town, and then I joined the AF when I grew up and no longer live there either, though we still own the home, run down as it is today on the remains of the farm where my dad picked cotton as a boy.


And yes, the end of the cotton mills has ended an entire era for that region of SC/NC. There was something about growing up on a mill hill village that isn't duplicated elsewhere. Hard for others to understand that culture and way of life that is now gone.
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Old 03-01-2017, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,485 posts, read 26,089,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty011 View Post
Thomas Scott
James Olmstead
Dr.John Olmstead
Capt. Richard Olmstead

Richard Olmstead also was one of the first to settle Norwalk.
That's funny! I have the Olmsteads in my tree as they married into collateral lines.

Our trees may not share roots, but the branches are intertwined way up high!
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Old 03-01-2017, 05:47 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,985 posts, read 17,140,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Hey, Scotty and Wamer, who were your Hartford settlers? I have two, Selden and Spencer.

I also have early settlers in Lyme (Marvin), New Haven (Clark), Saybrook (Chapman), and Haddam (Brainerd, Spencer, Stannard, and Ventres).
CHAPMAN here, too. I think it's the same family because it's New London Country, CT. Mine started with Edward b.Hull, Eng, d.Ipswich MA, Symond b.Rowley MA d.Ipswich MA, Joseph b.Rowley d.Norwich, CT 1725, Moses b.Norwich CT 1711 d.Norwich CT 1760, David Chapman b.1735 Norwich CT, d.1814 Westhampton, MA, etc. (I hope I typed that right.)

Spooky thing is a long time ago I lived near Norwich CT and I lived within walking distance of Westhamton MA ten years later. Used to sit and gaze at the apple farm in Westhampton--found out that had been the Chapman's farm! And ten years ago I moved away and went to church in Rowley, MA but lived in Ipswich. None of them are near each other except Rowley & Ipswich. (genetic memory, lol.)

I lived in EAST Haddam, CT for one year and it's a beautiful little town but none of my direct ancestors lived there that I know of.

Johnny Appleseed was a Chapman. Those Chapmans really got around! I hope you Hartford people are related. That would be kind of exciting.

I think the migration pattern must have been to go up the Connecticut River. Saybrook is at the mouth, Hartford lies on the river and a lot of my families seemed to migrate up the river, eventually ending up in remote parts of VT and NH. I don't have any Hartford settlers though. My Chapmans weren't originally of Saybrook but they migrated down there before they came back north again.
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Old 03-01-2017, 07:26 PM
 
Location: One of the 13 original colonies.
9,964 posts, read 6,099,567 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
That's funny! I have the Olmsteads in my tree as they married into collateral lines.

Our trees may not share roots, but the branches are intertwined way up high!

Yes, that is very common among the early families. Small world isn't it?
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Old 03-01-2017, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Bay View, Milwaukee
2,071 posts, read 4,001,371 times
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One of my ancestors, Matthias Sention (St. John), Sr., was a founding settler of Dorchester, Mass. and Windsor, Wethersfield, and Norwalk, Conn. One of his sons and another ancestor of mine, Matthias Sention (St. John), Jr., also was a founding settler of Norwalk.

Another ancestor of mine, Robert Seeley, helped establish Watertown, Mass. and Wethersfield and New Haven, Conn.

Yet another ancestor, James Wallace, was a founding settler of Ridgefield, Conn. and possibly of North Salem, NY (still checking).

Most of my known ancestors settled in the South, but so far I only know of original settlers in rural domains, not towns.
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Old 03-01-2017, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,485 posts, read 26,089,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
CHAPMAN here, too. I think it's the same family because it's New London Country, CT. Mine started with Edward b.Hull, Eng, d.Ipswich MA, Symond b.Rowley MA d.Ipswich MA, Joseph b.Rowley d.Norwich, CT 1725, Moses b.Norwich CT 1711 d.Norwich CT 1760, David Chapman b.1735 Norwich CT, d.1814 Westhampton, MA, etc. (I hope I typed that right.)

Spooky thing is a long time ago I lived near Norwich CT and I lived within walking distance of Westhamton MA ten years later. Used to sit and gaze at the apple farm in Westhampton--found out that had been the Chapman's farm! And ten years ago I moved away and went to church in Rowley, MA but lived in Ipswich. None of them are near each other except Rowley & Ipswich. (genetic memory, lol.)

I lived in EAST Haddam, CT for one year and it's a beautiful little town but none of my direct ancestors lived there that I know of.

Johnny Appleseed was a Chapman. Those Chapmans really got around! I hope you Hartford people are related. That would be kind of exciting.

I think the migration pattern must have been to go up the Connecticut River. Saybrook is at the mouth, Hartford lies on the river and a lot of my families seemed to migrate up the river, eventually ending up in remote parts of VT and NH. I don't have any Hartford settlers though. My Chapmans weren't originally of Saybrook but they migrated down there before they came back north again.
My most distant Chapman is Robert, born 1591, England. His son Robert was born 1616, possibly in Hull. Apparently not all sources agree.

Robert had an exciting life, including being right in the middle of the Pequot War.

Yep, they got around: my Connecticut Yankee branch ended up in Georgia, sometime around 1831.
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Old 03-01-2017, 10:58 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,985 posts, read 17,140,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
My most distant Chapman is Robert, born 1591, England. His son Robert was born 1616, possibly in Hull. Apparently not all sources agree.

Robert had an exciting life, including being right in the middle of the Pequot War.

Yep, they got around: my Connecticut Yankee branch ended up in Georgia, sometime around 1831.
I've got Robert 1570-1620 born in (probably Hull) Yorkshire with some question marks because I'm not sure. Your Robert would have probably have been the brother of my Edward. NO! Here's something interesting:

Of note, DNA evidence now
points to Robert Chapman of Saybrook,
Connecticut as not being related to
Edward Chapman of Ipswich,
Massachusetts. DNA studies also point
to the possibility that Edward
Chapman’s ancestors lived in southern
and not northern Englandiv.


http://www.chapmanfamilies.org/Pub_E...%20Pathway.pdf

Looks like another mess to untangle.
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my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
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Old 03-01-2017, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,485 posts, read 26,089,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty011 View Post
Yes, that is very common among the early families. Small world isn't it?
Yep, and it's still small. I was Googling some cousins of my parents' generation tonight and found several obituaries for some I never really knew personally. I added some of their children and grandchildren to my tree and in the process I found a young couple who got married a few years ago. The bride went to the same high school my son did. We are distantly related (my sixth cousin once removed) to her through my mother's side of the family. We are related to the groom through several lines on my father's side, the closest at my second cousin once removed.

There are several other families here that are possibly related to me but we have not actually sat down and traced our respective lines, including some who even live in the same neighborhood that I do.
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Old 03-02-2017, 06:29 AM
 
309 posts, read 479,452 times
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Not me, I am a first gen immigrant but my wife's family came in on the Mayflower. They have a state park named after them in upstate NY and their family has lived around that mountain since the country's founding.

They have a cemetery near there and we visited once when we lived in NY. It was quite fascinating seeing all the names and all the infant deaths in the early years. Her own grandmother had 11 kids who survived and a few who died. Had her first at 14

Quite interesting really, I'd like to buy a property there some day as it is part of my son's heritage now and it would be a great place to start my own family's heritage here in America
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