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Old 03-15-2017, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tassity22 View Post
How di dyou find out they went to a Catholic church? Was it in marriage records?
census records tell religion
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Old 03-15-2017, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
census records tell religion
Not on any of the US public censuses (1940 and prior). Equally not in the UK's public censuses (1911 and earlier). I know today's censuses record religion, but without looking it up, I don't know at what point in history that began - you can't just assume that because the question is currently on the census, it must have always been the case in history.

I believe Canadian censuses did record religion as early as 1861, but for those of us with ancestry in the US/UK, the best place to find the religion of those ancestors is from church records.
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Old 03-15-2017, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by residinghere2007 View Post
I got the initial hint when talking to a great aunt of mine. I asked her about some of her great aunts/uncles that I found out she lived near as a child. At first she didn't remember them but then remembered when I shared their names and where they lived according to census and death records.

She told me that some of them "became Catholic" after marrying their spouses. I re-reviewed the death certificates and in Ohio they list the funeral home and the cemetery where people are buried. I noticed that some of the cemeteries were Catholic cemeteries. They lived in the NW Ohio area since the 1860s and the Toledo churches have their records on microfilm to browse. Knowing when these people died and what cemetery they were buried in lead me to specific time periods I could browse through the Catholic records.

Also, knowing they were Catholic, I could use their address information to determine what church they attended. My ancestors were predominantly black (I also have some Irish and Scottish ancestors who some I discovered were Catholic as well) and they lived in specific parts of the city over the years, primarily three districts. These districts were associated with 2 specific Catholic churches and browsing through the records on Family Search, I've found some information regarding marriages, births, and deaths in those churches regarding some ancestors.

Also, I do know distant cousins of these relatives and some of them are still Catholic and attend the same churches as their great great grandparents so they helped me get some Catholic documentation via the history departments at the churches themselves.

ETA: Also, yes, the marriage records were a clue. I sometimes do a quick google of minister's/priests names in marriage licenses that are county records. The records usually don't name the church, but they will say Rev _____ officiated the marriage on day/month/year. Looking up the Reverend's name usually leads me to his church and I can get more information on that particular family from that church. In my family we primarily have Baptist, AME, and Catholics. I recognize some of the Baptist and AME ministers because my families were a part of creating those churches, but not the Catholic ones. Also there were a lot of AME ministers in our local church for a span of about 20 years, they had about 20 ministers during that time! So looking them up and comparing to church histories lets me know what other information I can find with the church. Luckily all the churches that my family attended once they moved to this part of Ohio kept decent records, including pictures of congregation members starting in the late 1800s. So I get a lot of good info from churches.
Your research skills continue to amaze me!
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Old 03-16-2017, 06:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Not on any of the US public censuses (1940 and prior). Equally not in the UK's public censuses (1911 and earlier). I know today's censuses record religion, but without looking it up, I don't know at what point in history that began - you can't just assume that because the question is currently on the census, it must have always been the case in history.

I believe Canadian censuses did record religion as early as 1861, but for those of us with ancestry in the US/UK, the best place to find the religion of those ancestors is from church records.
I agree with this. US Census information does not include reference to religion. I have a few lines of my family that lived in Canada for about 50 years and Canadian censuses did have a column for religious affiliation, but not on earlier census records. Also the census data is not always accurate, at least in my family, in regards to religious affiliation of the family. For instance, as I stated earlier, most of my family is AME (African Methodist Episcopal) which is one of the first denominations created by and for black Americans. There is also the AME Zion (AMEZ) denomination that is a bit different from AME (I've had to learn a LOT about church histories in the past 5 years, which has been interesting). Most of the Canadian records they list my family members as "Methodist" and Methodism and AME/AMEZ type of Methodism is not the same as regular Methodists, not the same churches and not the same denominations. Two of my ancestors were listed as a profession though on US census documents as "ME" ministers. Usually that referred to AME though not always as one of these ancestors was not a minister according to AME records. He may have been some sort of deacon or acting minister and not in official AME records though.

But just going by the church affiliation for Canada, at least for me, would not be helpful since they don't name the church and got the denomination wrong.

Most of my Canadian ancestors were born/lived in the US since the early 1800s before moving to Canada and I know most of their religious affiliations and knew they were either AME, AMEZ, or AE (African Episcopal), before they showed up in Canada.

Also, I've found that some of the churches my ancestors attended had sort of a falling out with their denomination. One line in particular went to a church in PA that over the span of about 120 years was associated with AME, AE, AMEZ, and even was non-denominational in between some of those lol. They had disputes with leaderships within the church and with the denomination. Usually about their reverends/ministers. The congregation would want to keep a particular minister but the bishops of the denomination and the process to choose ministers for churches would call for that minister to be re-assigned. To prevent the minister from being removed, the church would "leave" the denomination lol.

FWIW, this is also why in my hometown they had 20 different ministers at the AME church over a span of about 20 years. They can and sometimes do, according to AME protocol change ministers that often. They have a conference every year to this day to determine where reverends will go or stay.
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Old 03-16-2017, 06:51 AM
 
15,475 posts, read 7,888,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Your research skills continue to amaze me!
Honestly I only recently started focusing on religious affiliation.

I posted a thread here a while ago about Quaker records. I was told by a genealogy friend that they believed some of my PA ancestors may have been mentioned in Quaker records because of their association with UGGR and anti-slavery movements.

I am still trying to figure out Quaker stuff. It has been difficult for me. The Catholics have been around my area since before the major city became a city so I was happy that we had some Catholics in the family. I honestly never even thought about cemeteries being Catholic until that conversation with my aunt and I had a "well duh" moment lol. I actually am one of those weirdos who loves cemeteries and I know which cemeteries are Catholic and I never even thought about it in regard to my own family until that conversation.

Also, I just on a whim googled some ministers as I had never seen the name that was listed as officiating a marriage on a county marriage record (it was from the 1880s) and discovered it was a Catholic priest so that lead me to what I call the wonderful world of Catholic records lol.
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Old 03-16-2017, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,265 posts, read 12,586,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Not on any of the US public censuses (1940 and prior). Equally not in the UK's public censuses (1911 and earlier). I know today's censuses record religion, but without looking it up, I don't know at what point in history that began - you can't just assume that because the question is currently on the census, it must have always been the case in history.

I believe Canadian censuses did record religion as early as 1861, but for those of us with ancestry in the US/UK, the best place to find the religion of those ancestors is from church records.
Well Ive seen a census taken in Nothern Ireland just at the turn of the century to the 20th and tells my grandmothers religion as Roman Catholic..This shows the religion being Church of Ireland, which is protestant.. https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ce...nFa1zHPe4kL4M: Ill try and find the copy of my grans family in Northern Ireland at the same time as it did say Roman Catholic..

Last edited by dizzybint; 03-16-2017 at 08:39 AM..
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Old 03-16-2017, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,265 posts, read 12,586,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Not on any of the US public censuses (1940 and prior). Equally not in the UK's public censuses (1911 and earlier). I know today's censuses record religion, but without looking it up, I don't know at what point in history that began - you can't just assume that because the question is currently on the census, it must have always been the case in history.

I believe Canadian censuses did record religion as early as 1861, but for those of us with ancestry in the US/UK, the best place to find the religion of those ancestors is from church records.
Well Ive seen a census taken in Nothern Ireland just at the turn of the century to the 20th and tells my grandmothers religion as Roman Catholic..This must have differed though in other countries for some reason.

This tells what was required in NI 1911.Head of the family[edit]
Form A, which was completed by the head of the family, contained the following information for each person in the home on the night of 2 April:

Census of Ireland, 1911: Form A
Name and Surname
Relation to Head of Family
Religious Profession (Protestants were requested to indicate denomination)
Education (whether able to read and write)
Age (last birthday) and Sex
Rank, Profession, or Occupation
Particulars as to Marriage (marital status, length of marriage, number of children born alive, number of children still living)
Where Born
Irish Language (whether able to speak Irish)
If Deaf and Dumb, Dumb only, Blind, Imbecile or Idiot, or Lunatic
The form was signed by both the census enumerator and the head of the family.
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Old 03-16-2017, 09:08 AM
 
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It is not unusual for religions to change when one marries someone of a different religion. It changes to whoever it is more important to. My grandmother was Irish Catholic, she married my grandfather who was German Lutheran but the kids were raised Catholic. I think her first husband was Protestant but not sure. Their 3 kids were also raised Catholic. My husband's side were all Protestants until more recent generations when they became Catholic. I don't know exactly where it might have changed as I never really looked at that.
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Old 03-16-2017, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,265 posts, read 12,586,130 times
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Yes your right things can change with religion,,, my Northern Irish grandparents came to Scotland , Grandfather Protestant, had their first son who was sent back to NI at age 12 for stealing a horse and cart... he grows up and marries his cousin from his mothers Catholic family turning Catholic from being raised a Protestant.. then has loads of children and grandchildren all Catholic so its a funny old world..
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Old 03-16-2017, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,920 posts, read 13,669,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
Well Ive seen a census taken in Nothern Ireland just at the turn of the century to the 20th and tells my grandmothers religion as Roman Catholic..This shows the religion being Church of Ireland, which is protestant.. https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ce...nFa1zHPe4kL4M: Ill try and find the copy of my grans family in Northern Ireland at the same time as it did say Roman Catholic..
Ireland is probably an exception because religion was such a hot button issue there at the time. No doubt the government wanted to keep an eye on how many Catholics vs CoE there were and in what locations. The rest of the UK did not record religion.
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