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Old 07-18-2017, 11:17 AM
bjh bjh started this thread
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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What are your favorite things you've learned from genealogy?
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Old 07-18-2017, 06:57 PM
Status: "Losing everything." (set 7 hours ago)
 
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That my gx4 grandfather was such a great poet and started a literary society.I like seeing the antique photos most of all.I learnt about different eras and became interested in history more because of my family history research.
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Old 07-18-2017, 07:34 PM
 
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one of my favorite things i found out from my genealogy is that i have family on both sides of the Salem Witch Trials.
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Old 07-19-2017, 03:19 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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I liked learning about the jobs ancestors had. That gets you reading about old jobs in general. It's interesting to browse old city directories or census records and see so many different things in business and technology that have changed or that you didn't know about. I'd be unlikely to learn of those things any other way.
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Old 07-19-2017, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Illinois
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Reading through old articles and material and actually doing the research to find my ancestors. It's really rewarding to break through a stonewall.
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Old 07-19-2017, 05:47 PM
 
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I think finding out more about the history of my home province back in the 1700s and 1800s was fascinating.

Wave after wave of immigrants from different places changed the fabric of many counties, repeatedly, over generations... France, England, up from the U.S., Ireland, Germany, etc.... life wasn't static or boring back then, quite the opposite. New villages and towns sprang up out of nowhere everyday. More intermarrying between the groups than I would've guessed before I did that family tree research.
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Old 07-21-2017, 10:18 AM
 
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I don't know if I could pick a favorite. I love the pictures and stories.

My dad remembered another story when I went to visit him last week.

Apparently, my brother needed some lines buried at his house. He asked a contractor where he works about hiring him. Originally the contractor said no he wasn't interested, but then asked him if he had any relatives in a specific nearby community. My brother said yes his grandfather had lived there. The guy decided to do the work. The guy came and did the work and my brother asked how much he owed him. The guy said 'nothing'. My brother said I need to pay you something. The guy said "No, you don't owe me anything." He told my brother a story.

I need to get more details so I can write this up properly. Apparently, there had been a tornado I'm assuming in the 1940's-1950's and it destroyed a lot of houses. My grandfather was a commercial fisherman. He offered to donate some fish to help out the affected families. Someone asked my grandfather for some fish and he started getting out some filets from the freezer and asked how many were needed. The man told him they wanted to have a fish fry. My grandfather said so you need fresh fish. My grandfather gave him three or four gunny sacks of live fish which was all he had. The contractor told my brother that the fish fry raised enough money to buy the lumber for four houses. He didn't want money. He just wanted to help repay my grandfather's kindness.
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Old 07-21-2017, 12:04 PM
 
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That family history oftentimes does not correspond with commonly thought of general history of the country, state, and/or local area.

Genealogical research got me really into local history research of the area I'm from and of Ohio history in general. It also made me very interested in the history of the administration of the Underground Railroad considering that I discovered many of my free black ancestors were involved in organizations/churches and lived in towns where it was known that the free black community shuffled escaping slaves through certain states (IN, OH, and PA).

My favorite thing about genealogical research is that when I am learning about someone, I also learn about their communities of which they lived and the events that shaped their lives and I gain a greater understanding regarding the history of our country.
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Old 07-27-2017, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Grand Junction, Co
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjh View Post
What are your favorite things you've learned from genealogy?
When I was about 16 I got into my genealogy. I was told by an uncle that I am a descendant of Frank Sellman, who played for the Fort Wayne Kekiongas and then the Washington Olympics at the very beginning of professional baseball. I thought that was pretty cool and it got me started into the whole thing. But after doing some studying, I came to rather a strange realization. I don't mean to rain on anyone's parade but once you go back more than three generations, maybe four, the whole ancestral tree gets pretty diluted. It's the mathematics. If my great X4 grandparent could look into the present from his or her grave over a century ago, he or she might see over a hundred great X4 grand children scattered everywhere, with all kinds of names and likely, various ethnicities. Maybe a few dozen of those great X4 grandchildren would know each other as 1st cousins, but the vast majority would be strangers. If you look the other direction: from today into 5 generations ago, for example, a person would see the same thing just in reverse. If I take my ancestral tree back into the early to mid 19th century, that is about 7 generations. That comes to over 100 great X7 grandparents, perhaps including Frank Sellman. It dawned on me that the Frank's lineage connection to me is minute.
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Old 07-27-2017, 02:11 PM
 
Location: zippidy doo dah
893 posts, read 1,266,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjh View Post
What are your favorite things you've learned from genealogy?
It has all been such a thrill. Overall, it has deepened my love and perspective of history. I spend so much time reading through old newspapers and the like and get to see what people were doing and saying and how it bore out in reality. Very sobering at times.

in particular, I found that all sorts of things happen in families. Some families are open about the ups and downs. Others, not so much. I would have thought I was more of a princess than I was and that I came from a long line of erudite, highly-educated and cultured people. Oh my goodness - how hard the facade must have been for people to have maintained. A little honesty would have left far fewer questions than I now ponder when the wind blows and a dog howls..............(a little poetic illustration)
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