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Old 07-23-2017, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by historyfan View Post
Were the older siblings all girls?
I am not the OP but this is a useful question. OP stated that no siblings are available after reading the post again.

My next thought would be again, the male child of a male sibling if one ever existed. Then perhaps the female child of such a person?

My gut is telling me that this is likely an in-family adoption of some sort. I hope that OP comes back and gives us more info.

OP, I would test with 23andMe and then upload to Gedmatch, WeGene, FTDNA, and MyHeritage if free uploads are still available. I don't have a lot of experience with Ancestry outside of it contains my extensive family tree. A DNA cousin is in the process of doing Ancestry right now and I will take his recommendations on moving there with testing, based on his experience.
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Old 07-23-2017, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,216 posts, read 12,800,785 times
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Due to the fact that 23andMe no longer offer any family trees (which are necessary for figuring out how you relate to someone/finding unknown bio relatives), I think you will get more out of testing with Ancestry.com, then uploading to FamilyTreeDNA for $19, and MyHeritage, Gedmatch, and DNA.land for free. WeGene specializes in Asian heritage - I haven't seen any mention of that so I'm guessing your husband doesn't have any Asian background, so I'm not sure if there would be a huge benefit to uploading there. If it's a free upload, it won't hurt, but just a warning that it could be a waste of time.
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Old 07-23-2017, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Illinois
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When dealing with adoption, the haplogroup info would be useful to OP.

IJS.
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Old 07-23-2017, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,216 posts, read 12,800,785 times
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Haplogroups aren't necessarily useful even with adoptions. If you happen to get one associated only with a certain group of people, like Native American, then yes, that's helpful. But generally, all it tells you is the prehistoric migration pattern of your ancestors. Or that your your European. Nothing extremely specifically, and nothing hugely relevant to recent genealogy. The surnames of his Y matches will be more important and potentially more useful.
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Old 07-23-2017, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Haplogroups aren't necessarily useful even with adoptions. If you happen to get one associated only with a certain group of people, like Native American, then yes, that's helpful. But generally, all it tells you is the prehistoric migration pattern of your ancestors. Or that your your European. Nothing extremely specifically, and nothing hugely relevant to recent genealogy. The surnames of his Y matches will be more important and potentially more useful.
I said that I wouldn't quote you because I find you, um, special.

In this case where a strong push for some sort of in-family adoption may be the case, it IS a call for getting haplogroups. I suspect that OP's husband's father may have been the son or some sort of relative to the adopted family. And I would start with removing that doubt FIRST.

And to stop the derailing of this thread, I will turn this back over to the OP. It is about her, after all. Right?

OP, again, I think this may have been some sort of in-family adoption. The more info that you have the better answers you will gather.

I am not here to argue. I am providing answers that are comprehensive.
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Old 07-23-2017, 09:39 PM
 
2,746 posts, read 3,914,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
Something that is odd to me is that he was adopted by poor farmers who already had 3 other children.

My first thought would be that they adopted the child of a family member. I would keep that in the back of my mind while researching.


I had the same thought.
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Old 07-23-2017, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daliowa View Post
I had the same thought.
People tend to care for their own.

That is all that I know. I go to bat for the adoptees that I encounter.
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Old 07-23-2017, 09:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
I agree with the person above me and would simply ask k, preferably a male sibling or the male child of your husband's father side of the family.

It is interesting that the adopted son is Jr. Very interesting.

I think I know where you're going with this....
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Old 07-23-2017, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,153,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daliowa View Post
I think I know where you're going with this....
And why I am saying 23andMe....

I hope that OP comes back and share.
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Old 07-24-2017, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Arizona
5,577 posts, read 4,780,727 times
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Jr. doesn't have to mean a name change. I am sure many men named Robert have adopted boys already named Robert.

I would check the adoptees parents families first and look for people that died young. Most of the adoptions in my family were children of relatives that died young.
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