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Old 11-16-2017, 07:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
This is about the Welsh, not the Irish, but as studies continue, we could find it applies to the Celts in general:

What DNA might tell us of the history of Welsh people - Daily Post

"The last ice age covered the valleys and mountains with a thick blanket of ice and nothing, animal or plant, could survive in this polar landscape.

But once the ice melted about 11,000 years ago, the first pioneers came north. And some certainly came from what is now Spain. During the millennia of ice, people sheltered in what are known as the Ice Age Refuges, caves on either side of the Pyrenees.

The refuges began to empty as the ice melted and the herds people depended on moved north.

Already the CymruDNAWales project has discovered people, especially in South Wales, who are directly descended from the pioneers from the Pyrenees."

This was using Y and mtDNA.

https://www.s4c.cymru/cymrudnawales/e_index.shtml
It's outdated. Britain and Ireland was mostly repopulated in the Bronze Age with Bell Beakers. It was a near total population replacement. So most Irish (especially) and British are descendants of these Bronze Age Bell Beakers. R1b the majority ydna only arrived during the Bronze Age.

You might find these recent studies interesting if you have time to read them.

Neolithic and Bronze age migration to Ireland and establishment of the insular Atlantic genome

https://pure.qub.ac.uk/portal/files/...y_material.pdf

The Beaker Phenomenon and the Genomic Transformation of Northwest Europe

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/bior...35962.full.pdf

There is also the People of the British Isles study and a very thorough genetic study coming out on Ireland hopefully in the next 6 months called the Irish DNA Atlas.
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Old 11-16-2017, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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Bell Beakers were in Iberia too. The People of the British Isles study is from 2011, long before the article I posted, and didn't include data from most of Ireland.
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Old 11-16-2017, 07:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Bell Beakers were in Iberia too. The People of the British Isles study is from 2011, long before the article I posted, and didn't include data from most of Ireland.
Yes but the article is using old and outdated information. Newspaper articles recycle a lot of old stuff and some of these dna companies take a long time to catch up and usually give out inaccurate information. It in no way is as up-to-date as the PoBI which uses autosomal dna.

Bell Beakers did not have the same impact on Iberia that they had in Ireland and Britain which is why those populations don't cluster together.

Here is the pdf about Iberia.

http://journals.plos.org/plosgenetic...type=printable
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Old 11-22-2017, 08:55 AM
 
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There is a new feature on the 23andMe (well new to me anyways) web site. Go to Reports/Anscestry/Ancestry Composition.

It gives my % Iberian as 2.2% when I click on the detail for European.

Then continue to scroll down. There is a graph "Your Ancestry Timeline" with horizontal bars and it list Iberian with this note if you hover over it.
"You most likely had a second great-grandparent, third great-grandparent, fourth great-grandparent, or fifth great-grandparent who was 100% Iberian. This person was likely born between 1760 and 1850."

This graph is really interesting because it shows the generations where you likely had a full blooded ancestor.

We have French Canadian Ancestors who came to Canada from France in the 1600s. We do know that our French Ancestor was a descendant of a Jewish ancestor that was expelled from Spain in 1492 as part of the law expelling the Jews at that time. He went to France. Our guess is that a whole group of them went to France and continued to intermarry within their ethnic group for a 100 years until our ancestor migrated to Canada as a French person, taking one son with him but leaving behind wife and other son. Then married again in Canada. So as far as we can tell that is where this 100% Iberian ancestor born between 1760 and 1850 came from. But we don't have too many ancestors identified in the early 1600s so it could have been someone else. We also have a 100% French and German ancestor at the same time. Could it have been his new wife in Canada?

It is kind of fun to look at the bar graph and see if you can match it up to individuals in your family tree.
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Old 03-23-2018, 07:14 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
I'm German and Irish mostly and I have no Iberian DNA based on 23andme results. On Gedmatch I have a trace of West Mediterranean but nothing labeled "Iberian". I have a paternal haplogroup of R L-51 that is probably older than present day populations identified as anything. It probably originated with Bronze/Iron Age people somewhere on the way to western Europe.
An Update -- Recent MyHeritage results claim a small amount of Iberian DNA but their map of Iberian covers everything from Sicily to SE Ireland. This is probably the same as the West Mediterranean trace from Gedmatch. My R L-51 haplogroup is from a Baltic area just west of Gdansk -- not at all common in that north/coastal Poland region. This likely results from a late medieval migration eastward out of western Germany.
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Old 02-21-2019, 02:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpat View Post
There is a lot of Iberian (specifically Basque) DNA in a lot of Irish people, and a lot of Irish DNA in a lot of Basque people. I'm not sure why this is the case (many theories) but there is a definite connection.

There isn't, they just share R1b

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Old 02-21-2019, 03:19 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
5,828 posts, read 3,289,160 times
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I'm mostly Germanic and Irish. When my very first results came up from 23andme I had a trace of Iberian but that went away in a few days. Now, after a couple of years, I suddenly have 0.2% Portuguese and Spanish ancestry after the recent update. I have no Iberian results from my Ancestry test. My results from Myheritage (based on my 23andme test) show 2.2% Iberian. Having traced my ancestry on most lines into the 1600s or earlier, there is no hint of Iberian ancestry that I know of. My haplogroup, R-L51, could be the culprit since it seems to have a possible Iberian connection several thousand years ago.
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Old 02-22-2019, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Mid West
19 posts, read 8,640 times
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Here's the deal, we want to think of the world countries as we know the official boundaries today verses what the country boundaries were at various times through out the entire history of planet earth. Official country boundaries have vastly changed over the centuries. One of my brick walls was a gr gr grandfather, who was always suppose to be "German", but he was from France, a part of France that went back and forth officially as both France and Germany. And spoke a dialect of both languages. I love those interesting details, looking up history of those regions, all the changes. Its a great history lesson aside from where my DNA might be. But I love history, Dna has opened news areas for me to learn about besides just who my ancestors might be.
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Old 02-22-2019, 02:43 PM
 
58 posts, read 9,879 times
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Mom is Polish and dad mixed European.



23andme just came back as 50.4% Polish, 21.6% British, and 16.7% German which I expected.


Also...2% Italian and 1.2% (Spain and Portugal...which is the Iberian component).


So yes, but just a little in my case.
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Old Today, 08:29 AM
 
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There is no Irish - Baque gentic connection. and if you are one of the idiots who goes around saying there is educate yourself
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