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Old Yesterday, 02:28 PM
 
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very interesting, if it pans out. seems like this would really screw up some DNA testing results..
Quote:
But whether human males can also pass on mitochondrial DNA to their offspring is controversial. In 2002, doctors in Denmark published a case in The New England Journal of Medicine of a man who appeared to inherit 90 percent of his mitochondrial DNA from his father. But no additional cases of this happening were reported in the following 16 years, leading many researchers to think that the 2002 result was a result of technical errors.

But that all changed when researchers at Cincinnati Children's decided to investigate a 4-year-old boy's unusual genetic test results. The boy was suspected of having a mitochondrial disease ó or a disease caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA. When the researchers sequenced his mitochondrial DNA, they didn't find any apparent disease-causing mutations, but they noticed something very odd: It appeared as though the boy had two sets of mitochondrial DNA.

Further investigations revealed that the boy's mother had inherited mitochondrial DNA from both her father and her mother (the boy's grandfather and grandmother), and she had passed down this mixed set of mitochondrial DNA to her son.
https://www.livescience.com/64172-mi...-dna-dads.html
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Old Yesterday, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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Blaine Bettinger addressed this on his blog, basically explaining this is really rare and the results of an abnormality or disorder - it is not something the vast majority of people need to worry about, although the media coverage isn't really explaining this very well:

https://thegeneticgenealogist.com/20...ally-come-dad/

"What is missed from the media coverage, however, is that these families were identified because member(s) were presenting with conditions that made the researchers suspect a mitochondrial disorder.

[...]

This research strongly suggests that while paternal inheritance of mtDNA can occur, it is extremely rare and likely co-presents with mitochondrial disease. Thus, all mtDNA research to date suggests that paternal inheritance of mtDNA will not affect genealogical research."

Basically, if you don't have symptoms of a mitochondrial disease, don't worry about it.
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Old Today, 11:19 AM
 
Location: NJ
9,324 posts, read 20,355,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
Blaine Bettinger addressed this on his blog, basically explaining this is really rare and the results of an abnormality or disorder - it is not something the vast majority of people need to worry about, although the media coverage isn't really explaining this very well:

https://thegeneticgenealogist.com/20...ally-come-dad/

"What is missed from the media coverage, however, is that these families were identified because member(s) were presenting with conditions that made the researchers suspect a mitochondrial disorder.

[...]

This research strongly suggests that while paternal inheritance of mtDNA can occur, it is extremely rare and likely co-presents with mitochondrial disease. Thus, all mtDNA research to date suggests that paternal inheritance of mtDNA will not affect genealogical research."

Basically, if you don't have symptoms of a mitochondrial disease, don't worry about it.
If anyone wants to read about mito, see the link. It was once considered rare but these days with better testing isn't as rare as it used to be. I do not doubt I have some form of it and it's getting more and more obvious as I get older.

It's part of another disorder known as a connective tissue disorder (CTD) which affects just about every system in the body.

From what I've seen in groups I used to go to; it affects a lot of Europeans. If you are/were double jointed; you could have a CTD

What is Mitochondrial Disease? Although mitochondrial disease primarily affects children, adult onset is becoming more common.
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Old Today, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
If anyone wants to read about mito, see the link. It was once considered rare but these days with better testing isn't as rare as it used to be. I do not doubt I have some form of it and it's getting more and more obvious as I get older.

It's part of another disorder known as a connective tissue disorder (CTD) which affects just about every system in the body.

From what I've seen in groups I used to go to; it affects a lot of Europeans. If you are/were double jointed; you could have a CTD

What is Mitochondrial Disease? Although mitochondrial disease primarily affects children, adult onset is becoming more common.
It might be less rare than originally thought but itís still very rare with fewer than 20,000 cases per year.
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Old Today, 01:27 PM
 
Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
It might be less rare than originally thought but itís still very rare with fewer than 20,000 cases per year.
Agree but in another 5 years it will be way more common; especially with how cheap DNA tests have gotten and how many people are using them. Every time I go to My Heritage my numbers jump. I don't follow Ancestry as much as my heritage because I had barely anyone at my heritage when I started.

You wouldn't believe how common a CTD has gotten in 5 years. More people will know they have mito.
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Old Today, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,289 posts, read 12,924,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
Agree but in another 5 years it will be way more common; especially with how cheap DNA tests have gotten and how many people are using them. Every time I go to My Heritage my numbers jump. I don't follow Ancestry as much as my heritage because I had barely anyone at my heritage when I started.

You wouldn't believe how common a CTD has gotten in 5 years. More people will know they have mito.
Keep in mind FTDNA (Family Finder) and MyHeritage donít include any mtDNA in their autosomal DNA tests. AncestryDNA does include mtDNA, but itís so minimal (195 SNPs) that I donít know how realistic a diagnosis for Mito Disease would be from that. 23andMe and LivingDNA are really the only ones who include a significant amount of mtDNA in an autosomal DNA test (over 4,000 SNPs). And to be honest, I donít know how much data is needed for a diagnosis, or whether SNPs are even what is used. Point being that I donít know how much the popularity and reducing prices of autosomal DNA tests will really influence this, since itís to do with mtDNA, not autosomal DNA. A full sequence mtDNA test might be necessary, which is normally $200 (I wouldnít call that cheap, nor do I think the numbers of people taking mtDNA tests has drastically gone up), and even if the mtDNA data from autosomal tests can be used, people are limited by which companies will include it.

In any case, I donít think we can say for sure that more people testing will necessarily mean we find Mito Disease isnít rare. As has already been found, it might be less rare than previously thought, but itís still rare, and I doubt very much weíre going to suddenly find itís really common. My original point was just that the vast majority of people donít need to worry about this, which is true, as explained to us by a professional in the industry (Blaine Bettinger has written two popular books on genetic genealogy).

Another point that should be considered is that mtDNA isnít normally very useful for recent genealogy anyway, so even if we were to find this is common, itís not going to influence that many peopleís DNA results in a meaningful way. MtDNA tests are the least common of all DNA testing, and most people find the DNA matches arenít relevant to their genealogy research, meaning the most it will ďscrew upĒ is perhaps your haplogroup, which again, is not relevant to recent genealogy. My point is, the sky is not falling, this will very likely have no influence on most peopleís DNA results, not only because itís rare, but also because most people havenít done an mtDNA test, and even if they have and they do have Mito Disease, itís probably not going to significantly influence their genealogy research anyway.
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