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Old 02-09-2019, 11:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slade51 View Post
We did 23 & me. Not a lot of surprise, I knew I was Irish, German, Sicilian with a touch of English.

It reported ~34% from a very specific region of Ireland, ~32% from Iberian Peninsula, and the rest vaguely from Northern Europe / Nordic region.

So I figure that the Irish didn’t travel very far to find spouses, and there was a lot of mingling in north-central Europe due to wars and changing borders. I was surprised that they couldn’t narrow down the southern Italy/Sicily area.

With my wife, they didn’t even try to distinguish between her Polish, Russian, Jewish heritage - she was all Eastern European to them.
That sounds like my initial result. As they have refined it the Iberian Peninsula went away and the rest moved to England/Ireland with the rest centered on Scandinavia. The marked areas all shifted north and east from Europe and south and west in Scandinavia.
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Old 02-10-2019, 01:36 AM
 
Location: Lexington, Kentucky
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I did. It's really interesting. I thought that I was a lot more Irish than I was.
In fact we even have more DNA from Norway and Sweden than Ireland!
Quote:
DNA ESTIMATES:

England, Wales & Northwestern Europe64%
Germanic Europe20%
Norway6%
Sweden6%
Ireland & Scotland4%
The way my Mom and Grandma talked, our famly was fresh off the boat from Ireland.
(I have traced the tree back to the sixteen hundreds and still haven't found all my immigrant ancestors!)
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Old 02-10-2019, 04:08 AM
 
Location: NJ
9,784 posts, read 20,687,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JanND View Post
There was a very good comment on a thread in the adoption section....I'll try to find it and link it to you. It gives good critic of various geneology sites as well as DNA programs....START HERE If you're looking for bio family
Thanks. It's in people search because we have a lot of people looking for bio family. I also have a post here in genealogy Family tree and DNA general instructions
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX via San Antonio, TX
5,856 posts, read 8,301,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Over the hill gang View Post
I paid for the DNA test on ancestory.com and I think it's crap. LOL
I was given a list of 1st and 2nd cousins...on and on..... but we all agreed that we couldn't be related.
NOT one name of any of our trees matched up, we didn't have a single name in common. Many of them told me they found that was the case with others on their list too. I have read a couple of stories online that it worked for some but all those I talked to think it's a load of crap.

I've done my family tree on my mother and father's side back to the 1700's. Most came from Germany, Scotland, England, Holland. And yes, I know my parents were my real parents.
Do some more digging on trees. Most likely there is a sister or brother to a large family that is related. That's how many of my third-sixth cousins are. They haven't bothered to add/research siblings to their ancestor and neither have I. That's how there are dead ends and it looks like no one is related.

And to answer the OP, yes. I have without much fanfare except to see that my mother is not Irish, but English after all our records show her great grandfather immigrated to the US from Ireland. Everything else was confirmed on both my mother and father's side.
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Old 02-10-2019, 11:36 AM
 
Location: The Ozone Layer, apparently...
1,763 posts, read 579,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
I have not.

My father did and found our paternal Scots-Irish heritage roots, back to a point when records seem to run out. The king of England exiled my family's clan from Scotland to northern Ireland in the 1600s. Apparently his whims moved people around the UK.
His maternal side came directly from Norway on her paternal side, immigrated and had her here in the USA.
So i know that part of my pedigree.

My mothers side is a bit of a mystery, but it has been assumed her side of the family was English, Irish and German. I started search ancestry.com and went back to early to middle 1700s (still in the USA), but it was obscure before that, as to exactly where their ancesters migrated from.

I was thinking about ancestry.com or 23 and me for more info.

So i was wondering how many of you have done so, and what did you learn?


The Scots-Irish are a seafaring people who lived their lives around the waters of both Scotland and Ireland, hence the bi-country title for those people. My particular branch had an ancient settlement in Mayo. There are settlements all over Ireland and probably some in Scotland too. These settlements have been dated to 4000 years ago at least.

Most of the early settlers to the US were Scots-Irish.
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Old 02-10-2019, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,468 posts, read 13,170,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ComeCloser View Post
The Scots-Irish are a seafaring people who lived their lives around the waters of both Scotland and Ireland, hence the bi-country title for those people. My particular branch had an ancient settlement in Mayo. There are settlements all over Ireland and probably some in Scotland too. These settlements have been dated to 4000 years ago at least.

Most of the early settlers to the US were Scots-Irish.
Scots-Irish is the American name for Ulster Scots, Scottish people who settled in Ireland (primarily Ulster) as a result of a government sanctioned Plantation of Ulster: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantation_of_Ulster

There was other unorganized migrations too, and that may have included some seafarers, but that is not the sole or primary origins of this term.
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Old 02-10-2019, 02:12 PM
 
2,683 posts, read 645,342 times
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I personally find the concerns over privacy outweigh my need to know.
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Old 02-10-2019, 02:34 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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DNA confirmed what my family tree research had shown: I'm mostly British Isles with some Germanic Europe.
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Old 02-10-2019, 03:49 PM
 
Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
I have not.

My father did and found our paternal Scots-Irish heritage roots, back to a point when records seem to run out. The king of England exiled my family's clan from Scotland to northern Ireland in the 1600s. Apparently his whims moved people around the UK.
His maternal side came directly from Norway on her paternal side, immigrated and had her here in the USA.
So i know that part of my pedigree.

My mothers side is a bit of a mystery, but it has been assumed her side of the family was English, Irish and German. I started search ancestry.com and went back to early to middle 1700s (still in the USA), but it was obscure before that, as to exactly where their ancesters migrated from.

I was thinking about ancestry.com or 23 and me for more info.

So i was wondering how many of you have done so, and what did you learn?

Where did your father do his DNA? Was it at ancestry? If yes I suggest testing thyere because you don't have your moms DNA, you testing will give you her side. Ancestry has the largest DNA database that grew a lot. You then upload to the free sites, My Heritage, FTDNA and GEDmatch Genesis. For directions see my thread Family tree and DNA general instructions
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Old 02-10-2019, 04:24 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,083 posts, read 1,927,695 times
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I did 23andme for health info back when they were allowed to give it out. It hit my main risk factor on the head. I just recently did Ancestry for relative info. They are pretty similar but different people used one or the other. I haven't had time to follow up with a couple of new people on Ancestry.

When I was doing genealogy I discovered that my father's family came over before the Revolutionary War. I was shocked as that was never mentioned. By then my father had died so I couldn't tell him.


I met one distant cousin I stay in touch with but I think that was when I googled my grandmother and found a wonderful family tree my cousin had done. Nobody else in my family has any interest in family history so I gave up doing it when my Mom died.
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