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Old 02-10-2019, 04:52 PM
 
Location: London U.K.
1,348 posts, read 571,360 times
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My wife paid to have her DNA checked out, and the results came back something like 90% Northern European, 3% Irish, and 7% French.
Her brother said, “Bummer about the 7%.”
She said, “Hey, where do you think Jean-François got his name, his family aren’t Mongolian.”
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Old 02-10-2019, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Ohio
18,725 posts, read 13,712,239 times
Reputation: 14803
Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
I was thinking about ancestry.com or 23 and me for more info.

So i was wondering how many of you have done so, and what did you learn?

I learned very little from Ancestry.

I learned a lot after taking a Y-DNA test -- which Ancestry does not offer -- from FTDNA.

I know exactly where my paternal ancestors were in Ireland 850 years ago to within a few miles.

There's a town named after them. The town came later, but before that they lived a few miles away and owned all that land.

So, I'm Irish? Nope. They got that land as a reward for being part of the Norman invasion force that invaded Ireland.

Before that, they were living in southern England, and they got that land as reward for being part of the Norman invasion force that defeated King Harold at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

From the "Doomsday Book" I got it narrowed down to 16 suspects.

So, I'm Norman French? Nope. I'm actually Greek based on the Y-DNA Haplogroup.

My distant paternal ancestors were Greeks living in the Roman Empire, probably an administrator in Roman government (as many Greeks were), or a ranking member of a Roman Legion, or a merchant. When the Romans colonized Normandy, they went along and set up shop. After the Roman Empire fell, they stayed, then went with the Normans to conquer England, then again with the Normans to conquer Ireland.

Then, the British came to Ireland and stripped them of their land and wealth.

Chalk it up to Karma, I guess. What goes around, comes around. Can't get mad after you push people off their land and then others come and push you off your land.

They went back to England and then came to the US.

By the strangest of coincidences, in 1987, I went to RAF Greenham Common to play with the cruise missile warheads for a month. The air base is just south of a town called Newbury in County Berkshire. The first weekend, we just went to the village across from the main gate and ate a pub. Then the jet jockeys told us there were two Chinese restaurants in town.

We were all Jonesing for Chinese food. There wasn't any Chinese restaurants where we lived in Germany. You had to drive 45 minutes just to get to one, and it totally sucked. Wasn't worth the drive much less the price. The next weekend, we rode the bus into town and spent the day walking around window-shopping and sightseeing, then ate at a really good Chinese restaurant, went to a pub to drink, then piled into an ugly black taxi to get home.

My 3rd great-grandfather was born in Newbury, and he and his father were boot-makers and owned a shop there. I probably walked right by it and didn't even realize it.

He moved to London and set up shop there, and that I did walk by. It was on Mile End and that's where I caught the Tube to take me to Tottenham Court Road, where I switched to another train to take me to Camden where I worked. A few months later, I bought an apartment over in Queen's Park, and that's were I lived.

Anyway, a Y-DNA test will tell you more about your ancestry than a generic autosomal DNA test.

If you want to know your maternal lineage, especially if you're a woman, then get an mt-DNA test.
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Old 02-10-2019, 07:54 PM
 
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I considered it but was concerned about giving away the rights to my dna to a large corporation. Not worth it in my opinion.
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:28 PM
 
4,587 posts, read 2,970,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Anyway, a Y-DNA test will tell you more about your ancestry than a generic autosomal DNA test.

If you want to know your maternal lineage, especially if you're a woman, then get an mt-DNA test.
I think there are many ways of looking at it. A Y-DNA test does show ancestry, but just your father's father's father's etc line. Same with the mt-DNA test, it's your mother's mother's mother's etc. line. In both cases it does show ancestry/lineage, no doubt, but those two lines make up what % of your entire family tree?

I think others like Roselvr and PA2UK, can explain it better than me, but the DNA tests you get from Ancestry, My Heritage and 23andMe are just a part of the genealogy toolbox that people can use to help build their family trees and when used properly, it's a very powerful tool. So I wouldn't just tell people to forget about autosomal DNA testing.
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:31 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,277 posts, read 73,459,643 times
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I learned I did not come over on the May flower
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Old 02-11-2019, 06:15 AM
 
11,659 posts, read 19,884,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Yes, and I'm not Italian and I'm not German. I'm 54% Irish and the rest is mostly Scandinavian.

I also have two previously unknown relatives. A niece and a nephew by my oldest brother.

Surprise!!

My ancestry and my wife's are so close (see above) that we swear we are related somewhere back in time. We're like 87th cousins 12th removed or however that all works.
My family comes from 1700’s in Bedford County,Pa. I’ve discovered a small number of distant cousins marrying, recently. Given the smallness of the communities it was bound to happen that two people marrying today share a common set of 5th grandparents.
__________________
Solly says — Be nice!
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Old 02-11-2019, 09:12 AM
Lou
 
233 posts, read 91,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grlzrl View Post
I personally find the concerns over privacy outweigh my need to know.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GolfingCat View Post
I considered it but was concerned about giving away the rights to my dna to a large corporation. Not worth it in my opinion.
I have the same concern. I initially thought I wouldn't risk it, but started to change my mind when I got caught up in a relative's excitement over his Ancestry.com results. I was ready to order a test after being advised here that it would be the best way to track down my mother's biological family, but then I came across an article that brought me back in touch with my privacy concerns. I'll stick with online research. I've actually made a couple of significant breakthroughs in researching my mother's biological family.
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Old 02-11-2019, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
22,157 posts, read 16,328,965 times
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I haven't yet. It's one of those things I'd like to do this year.
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Old 02-11-2019, 02:55 PM
 
1,657 posts, read 700,544 times
Reputation: 4191
I learned nothing I didn't already know. Predominantly southern european roots. Some links to specific caveman groups, a few random minimal % links to other parts of the world. A waste of money for me and my wife. Really, what difference does it make if we are distantly related to kings or horse thieves, europeans or asians? We are still the same people. We know virtually nothing of our great grandparents who lived and died in Europe. Their progeny are probaly in the thousands. Getting notifications from 23 and me of dozens of less than 1% dna matched probable 5th cousins who are in the database is pretty pointless. I entered info on my grandparents into the database but have had no responses from people who knew they were in some way related to them. Family history stops for us in the 1800's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
I have not.

My father did and found our paternal Scots-Irish heritage roots, back to a point when records seem to run out. The king of England exiled my family's clan from Scotland to northern Ireland in the 1600s. Apparently his whims moved people around the UK.
His maternal side came directly from Norway on her paternal side, immigrated and had her here in the USA.
So i know that part of my pedigree.

My mothers side is a bit of a mystery, but it has been assumed her side of the family was English, Irish and German. I started search ancestry.com and went back to early to middle 1700s (still in the USA), but it was obscure before that, as to exactly where their ancesters migrated from.

I was thinking about ancestry.com or 23 and me for more info.

So i was wondering how many of you have done so, and what did you learn?


Last edited by bobspez; 02-11-2019 at 03:05 PM..
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Old 02-11-2019, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,989 posts, read 44,303,471 times
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My brother did the 23 and Me test, and since we're full siblings, I guess his results are mine too! He/we came back as being 93% Ashkenazi Jewish, 3% Finnish or Northern Russian, 3% Greek or Italian, and 1% Asian (which most people get). Not too much of a surprise there, except for the Greek/Italian; no idea where that came from, but I guess there was an explorer who passed through Russia and knocked up one of my ancestors.
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