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Old 07-19-2008, 12:37 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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Default being adopted by a Native American Tribe

Recently I stumbled on an article online about Barak Obama being "adopted" into the Crow Tribe. Apparently, (according to the article), there was a time in American history when people of color were adopted into these types of communities in the thousands.

I am wondering if anyone out there has any additional information about this kind of thing in modern day application. Is being adopted into a tribe just an honorary thing (like an honorary doctorate from a university), or do you really and truly become a member of the tribe? I realize that being Native American is racial - after all, being adopted by an African American family does not make you black. I'm just curious how this works.

Thanks to all who reply

20yrsinBranson
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Old 07-19-2008, 03:38 PM
Status: "Count your Blessings" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Capitan, NM
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I've heard that it is an honorary thing.
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Old 07-20-2008, 03:01 AM
 
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It is an honorary thing, and I would be proud to be adopted into an Indian tribe tribe, or be called a "Ky Colonel" or be awarded a "key to a city"
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Old 07-20-2008, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Log home in the Appalachians
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It is just an honorary thing and not all Native American tribes do it.
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Old 09-03-2008, 08:16 PM
 
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Default being adopted by a Native American Tribe

Dear One,

To the best of my knowledge:
If the tribe is a federally recognized tribe (such as the Cree) than they are a Sovereign Nation i.e. independently governed by their own constitution - a Nation separate from the US. This means they have their own set of laws - including adoption laws. Tribal members enrolled/listed on the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Roll are protected by all the US Federal laws pertaining to the covenant between the US Government and said tribe + all the general US laws protecting native persons. There is a story of a Sioux tribe member that killed a rival and turned himself in (1800's) to the US Government. He was prepared to die by hanging but they turned him away saying it is not a crime - it's not their jurisdiction. So, he and his wife rode home together.

Non-federally recognized tribes may also have a constitution and laws but are not sovereign nations. They are subject to Federal and State Laws in which they reside and are may not be protected by some of the laws protecting native persons. They are not listed on the BIA tribal roll.

In either case, most of the time adoption into a tribe is referencing 'spiritual adoption' such as when you have a close friend that is like a family member and you give them a family title such as sister, aunt, or uncle. You have not legally adopted them but non-the-less given them an honorary title. Being literally adopted into a tribe is called Tribal Adoption this is relevant for persons being adopted into tribes that are Federally recognized. Some tribes offer dual citizenship and most tribes require proof of lineage of a certain blood degree (as little as 1/64). Others may require that you live on the land. Life has not been easy and today there is a high percentage of poverty amongst our native populations. Speaking of which we went from 60,000,000 (60 million to 800,000 by World War I)

One Love

[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classification_of_indigenous_peoples_of_the_Americ as]Classification of indigenous peoples of the Americas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/url]

[url=http://nativeprogress.org/index.php?lang=en]One Spirit - Home[/url]
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Old 10-27-2008, 04:28 PM
 
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before my dad passed away he told my brother that we had some native american in us. (part cherokee and choctaw). i am having a hard time finding this information. my brother was adopted into a najavho tribe by a friend. i am very interested in the native american way of life, culture, etc. please let me know what i can do to be apart of the native american culture.


thank you

tammie lynn
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Old 04-08-2009, 03:41 PM
 
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Does anyone have the names of Indian Nations or 'tribes' which might be open to the Tribal Adoption a sympathetic historian into their Nation or 'tribe'?

I know that there are many Federally recognized Indian Nations or 'Tribes' in the United States and each one has its own criteria for membership and Tribal Adoption.

Surely, some of these Indian Nations or 'tribes' might be more open than others to considering a sympathetic person for Tribal Adoption:

Any suggestions?
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Old 04-08-2009, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Log home in the Appalachians
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kerr View Post
Does anyone have the names of Indian Nations or 'tribes' which might be open to the Tribal Adoption a sympathetic historian into their Nation or 'tribe'?

I know that there are many Federally recognized Indian Nations or 'Tribes' in the United States and each one has its own criteria for membership and Tribal Adoption.

Surely, some of these Indian Nations or 'tribes' might be more open than others to considering a sympathetic person for Tribal Adoption:

Any suggestions?
Look for one close to you and then make an effort to get to know them.
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Old 04-08-2009, 05:59 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, Texas
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One can't just walk up to a tribe and say "hey I want to be adopted" you have to have a wonderful 'honest' relationship with them and really work for the tribal ways and help the tribe thrive. Honorary membership most often is only givin to very special people who have made great accomplishement. I would not see a need for a mass adoption unless the tribe needed numbers.
I would look into your areas local tribal population, what tribes are close by. Also go to the 'public allowed' Pow Wows in the area.
PowWows.com - Your source for everything Pow Wow since 1996

To find you Native American heritage you have to do a full genealogy research and really hunt for the names dates and times of you ancestral heritage that crossed into the Native Americans. I have Cherokee, my great grandfather who was known as Doc Green was given up to missionaries while his tribe and possiblely parents were dieing on the Trail of Tears. He was never registered. He married a Blackfoot women who was also never registered and not much known about her just that she was mean nasty person (hows that for a legacy ).
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Old 04-22-2009, 08:31 PM
 
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I have heard the 'legend' of my Native American background all my life. I have researched all the websites and all through ancestry.com. I finally found it by writing email to the Kansas Historical Society (where Dad's family came from). They quoted me a $29 fee for copies. I sent it. Today I got an email that they FOUND proof that Dad's grandmother was Indian. Sometimes you have to try solutions that no one else tried before! Not in books, not in ancestry.com - so go to the historical society of the area where your family is from. Best of luck!
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