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Old 11-18-2009, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
10,839 posts, read 14,939,022 times
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I thought it might be fun and interesting to share a short story.

My paternal ancestor moved to OHio about 1820. He married lived in a small community and had several children. After the Civil War, the family moved west except one son who married and raised his children in the house where he was born.

The Shiplets, Ligget and Norman fathers walked their children to Sunday school each week. One day Ms Ligget girls took a fruit bearing plant to Ms. Shiplet a gift. It was most unusal and had an odd blossom. The plant produced the first tomatoes in Licking County.

Got one" Please add it.

Last edited by linicx; 11-18-2009 at 08:24 PM..
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Old 11-18-2009, 02:20 PM
 
Location: then: U.S.A., now: Europe
6,206 posts, read 5,439,035 times
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Default The "Starved Ship"

I did the family tree of some first cousins, the part of their family that we do not have in common. I came up with this gruesome story, which is a matter of history. The man in the story is their 4th grt. grandfather

Samuel Fisher came to America in his 19th year of age. (About 1740) The vessel was so scantily provisioned that long before the voyage was completed, one pint of oatmeal for each individual on board and a similar subsistence allowance of water was all that remained.

The passengers and crew subsisted in this manner for fourteen days. And when this was gone they were reduced to the eating the bodies of those who died. However, even this resource failed them, as they realized they could not survive just by waiting for the emaciated corpse of the next of their number to die. They would have to kill one of their healthy companions if they were to have food. They drew lots, and it fell to Samuel Fisher to give up his life to preserve the lives of the others.

Providentially, a vessel was sighted before he was slaughtered, and their signs of distress were observed; they obtained relief and he was saved.

But upon his arrival in America, he became the victim of an irony so cruel that it is hard to believe that there could be such unashamed and merciless greed. Young Fisher had made an agreement with the captain of the ship, that as he lacked enough to pay for his passage, the captain could sell him into indentured servitude for the price of his passage when they arrived. And notwithstanding that Samuel Fisher had nearly been slaughtered for food due to the parsimonious supply of rations, the Captain actually did follow through and sell young Fisher to a man in Roxbury near Boston to recover payment for Samuel's passage!

So deep an impression did the horrors of that passage make upon Samuel Fisher that in later life, it was reported, he could never, without pain, see the least morsel of food wasted, nor clean water thrown carelessly on the ground. The ship became notorious in New England as "the starved ship."
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Old 11-18-2009, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
11,290 posts, read 9,922,541 times
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I've got an interesting family history. I have piece of the family line that were the origional mormons, through my great-grandma. She herself was one of the last people alive who came from a church sanctioned polygamous family, and her father's family was kicked out of Missouri. They did the handcart thing across the plains and barely survived the trip. His father was shot and paralyzed in the infamous(to mormons anyway) Haughn's mill (not sure on the spelling) massacre.

My great grandfather's family came from Missouri; he came from a family that did all the mormon massacring. He was VERY non-mormon and started his own newspaper here in Utah when he was just a kid, the hooked up with great grandma. They made a life together desipite the religious differences. His newspaper grew up to be a pretty big deal and he died a wealthy man. My grandpa grew up in Northern Utah, was drafted and did a tour in Korea for the Navy. He met my grandma in Connecticut and eventually ended up a school superintendent in California.

My grandmother on the other side of the family came from Denmark alone when she was only 14 years old just after WW2. Her uncle was part of a underground Danish resistance group during the war and he ended up in a prision camp but survived the war. Her spouse (my grandpa) was raised on a poor Nebraska farm; his family went to California after the farm failed during the depression. When WWII started, he joined the Army and became an airplane mechanic. But he also had a talent for painting and he made a great deal of cash painting naked ladies on bombers for the airmen. Grandma and Grandpa met right after the war, and he used his saved up cash to buy a house in Southern California, where they raised a couple of kids and lived the 1950's American dream.

My mom and dad met up in California and after some 70's funkiness I showed up on the scene. The rest is history

Last edited by Chango; 11-18-2009 at 06:46 PM..
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Old 11-18-2009, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
11,290 posts, read 9,922,541 times
Reputation: 10327
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
I thought it might be fun and interesting to share a short story.

My paternal ancestor moved to OHio about 1820. He married lived in a small community and had several children. After the Civil War, the family moved west except one son who married and raised his children in the house where he was born.

The Shiplets, Ligget and Norman fathers walked their children to Sunday school each week. One day Ms Ligget girls took a fruit bearing plant to Ms. Shiplet a gift. It was most unusal and had an odd blossom. The plant produced the first tomatoes in Licking County.

Got one" Please add it.
Now WAY back I've got connections to Licking County too. I'm not sure how many greats it was, but I had a family member who was a longhunter in the 18th century. His name was Jon Channel, and he was a well known hunter. He was famous for "killing 5 bears before breakfast" and was one of the first white settlers in the area. I guess he fought in the revolutionary war too, despite being only just a boy at the time. Later in life (so the story goes) he went a bit crazy and lived alone in woods. Every year his family would go catch him and sew a new pair of underwear on him.

Maybe you know something about him?
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Old 11-18-2009, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
10,839 posts, read 14,939,022 times
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Five bears before breakfast? I had one in the RW that killed seven geese or something with one shot. Channel No.5 is the only one I know. The Licking Library is pretty cool, though.
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Old 11-18-2009, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
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my great grandpa moved here from the Saratov region on the Volga in Russia in 1913. His unborn baby brother (when he moved here) rode a boxcar to Siberia in 1941 when Stalin rounded up all the ethnic Germans and got rid of them one way or another. I went there and found them in 2000 sort of interesting history wise...
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Old 11-18-2009, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 16,221,348 times
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A favorite of mine from my family tree:

“We had a Fourth of July celebration near Napa in 1847. It was given by us at the Yount place. It must have been the first affair of the kind in California. We had about forty guests, most of them Spanish people of some prominence in the country. I made an enormous pound cake for the center of the table. Nobody had brought an American flag to California, so my sister, now Mrs. Wolfskill of Winters, made a little one of some narrow red ribbon and cut some blue silk from her best dress, and sewed on but one star, for material was very scarce, and the whole thing was not bigger than a woman’s handkerchief. We stuck it in the top of the cake. One of our guests was a Dr. Bailey [Bail], an Englishman of whom we all thought a great deal. He died long ago, but his two daughters are married and are living near St. Helena in Napa county, where they own big wine vineyards.
“Father had written across the little flag, ‘California is ours as long as the stars remain.’ The Spaniards took it all right, but Dr. Bailey became very much excited and snatched at the flag. All through the dinner he insisted upon removing it, declaring that the American flag should never wave over California. After the dinner, as my sister and I were driving to our house, Dr. Bailey rode beside our wagon and we clung to the little silk flag and kept waving it at him from one side and then the other as he urged his horse close and tried to grab it from our hands. About a dozen years ago father lent the flag to the California Pioneers, and they have it in their collection yet.
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Old 11-19-2009, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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I've written a short bio of most of my direct ancestors, here's some of the more interesting ones:

Quote:
Gabriel Andreas Adams Friis was born in Farsund, Vest-Agder County, Norway in 1820 to the parents of Jeremias Fredrick and Adele (Bergitte) Friis.

Sometime before he was 30, he immigrated to the USA and settled in Norway, Racine County, Wisconsin. There, with his wife, Abelone, he had three surviving children: Jeremias Fredrick, Edel and *Gilbert Adams. They had two other sons, twins named Eilert and Jeremias Fredrick but Eilert died at birth and Jeremias died as an infant a few months later.

Gabriel's brothers, Hans, Jeremias and Berent also immigrated to Norway, Wisconsin but it is unknown whether they travelled together or seperately or even as children with their parents.

In 1860, Gabriel was a sailor and could have sailed on a number of nearby lakes including Wind Lake or Lake Michigan. The family appeared to share a home (which valued $1,500 in real estate) with a Swedish family by the name of Olson.

Gabriel died at only 49 years old on April 11, 1870 in Norway, Wisconsin of "consumption" which is now known as Tuberculosis. After his death, his wife Abelone became a farmer so it's possible that before his death, Gabriel changed profession from sailor to farmer and Abelone picked up where he left off. His oldest son, Jeremias, also bore this burden, working as a farmer at only 15 years old after his father's death.
Quote:
John Fallows was born around 1796 in England. Not much of his childhood is known but as an adult, he married a woman named Martha, nicknamed "Matty", who may have been about five years older than himself. They had four children together, two boys and two girls named Mary, John Jr., Ellen and Josiah*.

In 1841, the family lived in Ashton-Under-Lyne, just outside Manchester to the east, where John worked as a Farmer. While Martha did not have an occupation, most of their children did. Mary, aged 18, worked as a school teacher; John Jr., 14, as a Male Servant and Ellen, only 12 years old, as a Cotton Weaver. Josiah, at 10 years of age, escaped working to support the family.

By 1851, the family had moved to Royton, Oldham where John continued to farm, owning 6 acres. Mary and Ellen had moved out of the household and presumably married, probably even starting families of their own. Both sons, however, remained and worked on the farm.

In 1861, now 65 years old, John had seemingly sold his farm and worked as an outdoor laborer. Perhaps he had become too old to run the farm and whatever type of outdoor work he did was slightly easier on his physical condition. The fact that he was unable to instead retire and the fact that their children worked to support the household from as young as 12, shows the hard working lifestyle that the people of their class had to endure in these times. It is not surprising to see that John's son Josiah moved to America, probably in hopes of better prospects.
Quote:
William Henry Godshall was born on May 6, 1853 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, to the parents of Abraham Kratz and Mary Boyer (Reiff) Godshalk. It’s likely that the spelling of the surname was changed by William when he was an adult because his mother Mary was still going by Godshalk when she died in 1900.

William was the youngest of 8 children and was only 12 years old when his father died in 1865 at 54. It is likely that his older brothers helped provide for he and his mother because only 5 years prior to their father's death, the entire family was still living together in the same household.

His older brothers Daniel and John also seemed to have an influence on his religion because despite their family before them being devote Mennonites, Daniel, John, William and another brother Enos, all became Methodists.

At the age of 24, he married Idella Williams in 1867 and they settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where William worked as a Carriage Builder. They had five children by the names of Leon Williams, Rena L, *Chester Harold, Carrie M and Viola G. However, Rena died before she was 15 years old.

At the age of 69, William died on December 18, 1922 in Chesnut Hill and is buried in Ivy Hill Cemetery with his wife and daughter, Rena. Wife Idella died the same year, only one month prior. Daughter Rena was originally buried in Northwood Cemetery but in 1942, two years after the death of her parents, she was removed and reburied with them in Ivy Hill Cemetery.
Quote:
In 1707 John Valentine Kratz was born in the Palatinate of Germany and immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1727 on the ship "Friendship" when he was 20 years old. Not much is known about his childhood apart from his father being named John Philip Kratz.

John Valentine was a devote Mennonite and left for the American Colonies to escape religious persecution. There, he settled in what was then Salford Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania and became one of the original members of the local Mennonite church (known at the time as a meeting house), built in 1738. He married Ann Clemens, the daughter of the man he bought his farming land from, Gerhart Clemens. In total, John wound up owning 300 acres of land, 150 in Upper Salford Township and another 150 in Lower Salford Township. For the original 163 acres he purchased in 1734, he paid £25, 6s., 8d.. For an additional 53 acres only 2 years later, he paid £53.

He and Ann had 9 children named John, Michael, Gerhart, Philip, Abraham*, Isaac, Valentine (daughter) and another Isaac (the first died young). Michael and Gerhart are thought to have died without any children.

John died in 1780, in the middle of the American Revolutionary War. Although John's religious beliefs and age prevented him from fighting in the war, he was a Patriot and supported the freedom of the colonies.
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Old 11-20-2009, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Blackshear, Georgia
159 posts, read 292,091 times
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[CENTER][SIZE=+1]My Great-Great Grandfather Was in the Civil War[/SIZE]
by Irvin L. Rozier
(Email: iwcroga@aol.com) [/CENTER]

On, April 15, 2006 I went to the grave marker dedication honoring the Civil War service of my great-great grandfather, Henry Prescott. His father was John Prescott (came from South Carolina) and his mother was Martha. He was born in Appling county, Georgia, June 21, 1839 and died in Charlton county, Georgia, on March 12, 1903. He served as a private with Company I, 27th Regiment, and company K, 54th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War.

The following lineage shows how I am related to him: Henry Prescott married Jane (Howard). They had nine children and the oldest was Jeanette Viola born August 28, 1866 (died September 21, 1937). She married Robert A. Gill, born July 3, 1859 (died June 22, 1931). They lived in Pierce county, Georgia, and had 12 children. Their sixth child was Ruth, born January 24, 1895 (died May 20, 1986). Ruth married Archie Perry Winn, born February 2, 1895 (died November 17, 1963). He was the ninth (of 13) child of Jasper J. Winn and Melissa Dowling.

Archie and Ruth had eight children. Their sixth and seventh children were twins, Mary and Mildred. My mother was Mary, born October 22, 1929 (died Jan 7, 2001). She married A.J. Rozier, born August 18, 1926 (died December 22, 1966). His father was James Bess Rozier born in 1890 (died 1933), from McIntosh County, Georgia. He married Esma Manning, born 1900 (died 1964). Mary and A.J. had five children and I am their third child.

The marker dedication was held on the burial grounds of Corinth Primitive Baptist church located in north Charlton County, Georgia. This land was donated by Henry for a church. He and his wife had moved to Charlton county in 1880. He purchased 750 acres of land and was a farmer. Many people were there, including some great-great-great-great grandchildren. The commander of the "Seaboard Guards" gave the opening remarks followed by a prayer from the Chaplain. I then had the honor of reading a portion of scripture, Psalm 116. To read the Bible at my great-great grandfather's marker dedication, and to see the crowd of some of my kinfolks was a special blessing to me. As the ceremony unfolded, it was plain to see that even though our great country was divided at one time, the most important thing is family. After all, soldiers (being a retired one myself), come from families and will fight to defend them.

As I reflected on Henry and Jane's life, I couldn't help but to think that the Good Lord knew what he was doing when he put them together. If all of their descendants would have been present yesterday, the church grounds would not have contained them. Henry was a God fearing hardworking family man. He served as he thought best, and I am so glad he was honored for his service.

This event helped me recognize my roots, and how my ancestors carved a living from the Wiregrass Area of South Georgia. Henry's old home place is still there. It is surrounded by majestic pecan and oak trees, no doubt planted by Henry or Jane. Some of the fields he cleared are still being cultivated, and some of his descendents still live on land that Henry bought.

Irvin L. Rozier, aka walkin2e
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Old 11-20-2009, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Blackshear, Georgia
159 posts, read 292,091 times
Reputation: 229
Revolutionary War Ancestors
[SIZE=3]I was recently doing some family history research and discovered that several of my ancestors served during the Revolutionary War. Some served in the War of 1812, and in the Indian, and Civil War. Here are the ones I discovered:[/SIZE]

[SIZE=3]Through my mother's side: Irvin L. Rozier, Mary Winn (m), Archie Winn (gf), Melissa Dowling Winn (g-gm), Lazarus Dowling (gg-gf) and Civil War veteran, Darling Dowling (ggg-gf), Jabez Dowling (gggg-gf) War of 1812 and Indian War, William Dowling (ggggg-gf) Revolutionary War, Robert Dowling (gggggg-gf) Revolutionary War. Frampton Dowling history (http://us.geocities.com/roberson28/dowling.html).[/SIZE]

[SIZE=3]Through my father's side: Irvin L. Rozier, A.J. Rozier (f) and World War II veteran, Esma Manning Rozier Crosby (gm), Isham Manning (g-gf), Shadrick Manning (gg-gf), William Manning (ggg-gf), Moses Manning II (gggg-gf) Revolutionary War. Symon Manning History http://www.eloudermilk.com/Manning.htm.[/SIZE]

[SIZE=3]Also on my father's side: Irvin L. Rozier, A.J. Rozier (f), Esma Manning Rozier Crosby (gm), Janie Elizebeth Crosby (g-gm), Aaron Crosby (gg-gf), Keziah Levisia Crummey Crosby (ggg-gm), Stephen Crummey (gggg-gf) Revolutionary War. Crosby History (http://www.eloudermilk.com/Manning.htm)[/SIZE]

[SIZE=3]I am doing more research. but it is interesting to note that most sides of my family (Roziers, Mannings, Gills, Winns) have been in America since the 1600s. That is why I love our great country.[/SIZE]

[SIZE=3]Irvin L. Rozier, Captain, Retired, US Army aka walkin2e [/SIZE]
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