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Old 12-09-2012, 02:13 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
Status: "Glad it's November." (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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Old 12-16-2012, 12:15 PM
 
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My wife collects odd names we have come across or met in our Genealogy searches: Spicy Overalls, Cherry Buns, Snow Flake, Gotobed, Snow, Bird, Fish and so on..... She has over 2000 names I believe on the computer.
My uncle named his girls, Joy and Delight? No expanation needed.
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Old 12-22-2012, 09:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Interesting list! Did you find some of these on census records? If so, I wonder if "Ellawese" was really "Eloise", and the census taker just wrote down what he thought he heard?? Or perhaps the parents heard "Eloise", liked and used it, but were unfamiliar with the usual spelling so wrote it phonetically. No idea if "Jennawese" might be the result of creative hearing/spelling or an actual made-up name to go with Ellawese/Eloise. Maybe "Genoiese"? Is that a name? Or a description of a native of Geneva/Genoa?.
Jennawese and Ellawese are current relatives that DH knew growin up. The census and many government records actually have them listed in vaious ways, many of which were the more traditional ways. They were twins and given the unconventional spellings by their parents. It is a running joke that they had many aliases.

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Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
"Viney" probably started out as a nickname for "Lavinia"... and the nickname, rather than the formal name, got passed along to the original person's namesakes..
This is something I can look into. My Vineys are all from the 1820-1908 and while not in direct trees, in the same general locations, so it may be a local adaptation of Lavina.

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Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
I bet "Narcipa" was really "Narcissa", and someone mistook the old written "long s", which can look like an f, for a p and accidentally omitted the second s. If this theory is correct, the name would have looked like "Narcifsa" originally when written, but the "long s" would have had a long tail descending below the rest of the letter, making it look much like a written lower case "p". There was a rule about using the "long s" after or before consonants, but I can't recall the rule...just that there was a rule..
This is likely correct. She apparently went by Narcie as a nickname and it was transfered as Nancy. I have Narcissa listed as the alternative name.

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Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
I expect "Esame" was really "Esme". Someone in your family liked Biblical and classical names, clearly..
I haven't looked deeply into this person, as she is more of a peripheral relative, but this makes sense.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
I had a several-times g-aunt who got listed on the census as "Arrow Bell" - of course, her name was really Arabelle, as other records make clear. I have another whose name was "Purify" - no, they were not Puritans, it began as a surname with that pronunciation but a different spelling...
Arrow Bell... now tha would be a cool name lol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
"Isham" is also a surname - I have some Ishams somewhere back in my father's family in 18th century Virginia. Keightley, Savage, Massie, and Kinchen are likely to be surnames as well - check the mother's side of their families. "Manllious" is usually spelled "Manlius" - it's an old noble Roman name. .
This is something to look into as well. I did not know Isham was a surname and my oldest Isham I have no information on the mother.... hmmmm. I knew Keightley was a surname but it hasn't helped me find his momma yet. Massie is another of my walls. Kinchen's mother is in debate as well. There is very little info on him other than his death at Lookout Point as a POW.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
As for "Vigage Micajah", my guess is that this person's name was just the Biblical "Micajah" but the census taker (or whoever) was uncertain what they had heard, so wrote down "Vigage" as well, perhaps intending to correct it later on - which never happened. If you pronounce the "e" as a "eh" sound, "Vigage" sounds very much like "Micajah". : "Vi-GA-ge(h)" instead of "VI-gage".
''

I thought of this as well. With limited records from the late 1700s and since he lived 120 driving miles away from the rest of the family, I don't stumble onto any relevant information to substantiate this.

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Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Names never cease to fascinate...
Can you imagine what our decendants will be saying about names in 100 years?
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Old 12-22-2012, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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Raptovulture would be unusual and kinda cool for either a boy or a girl I think.
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Old 12-23-2012, 05:46 AM
 
270 posts, read 207,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wyoquilter View Post
I found a few odd names for the females in my family tree. They are, Drucilla, Laminda, Lavina, Lotta and Cistena. The only odd name I have come across for males is Mathias otherwise the guys all have common names, which like another poster mentioned has made searching for ancestors problematic.
Druzilla is my favorite.
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Old 12-28-2012, 07:24 PM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,358 posts, read 50,609,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wyoquilter View Post
I found a few odd names for the females in my family tree. They are, Drucilla, Laminda, Lavina, Lotta and Cistena. The only odd name I have come across for males is Mathias otherwise the guys all have common names, which like another poster mentioned has made searching for ancestors problematic.
Mathias isn't that uncommon (maybe nowadays). But it's a bible/saint name--the apostle who replaced Judas.

I think I have heard of Lavina, but not the others. Interesting set of names.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:03 AM
 
Location: Lancashire, England
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Tasmania for a female!

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Old 01-16-2013, 01:14 PM
 
Location: San Marcos, TX
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Cormac, Aquila, Squire, Eliab, Rainey, Early, male names.

Sarai, Willie, female names. Willie Bell was my Great Grandmother, and it wasn't short for Wilhelmina or anything else you'd think of for a girl. It was just Willie. Maybe they were expecting a boy? Her tombstone reads "Will"!
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:43 AM
 
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In doing genealogy, we found that the census takers of the past were not Rocket Scientist. They put down what they thought they heard as we do now a days in school. To them spelling was not important. Remember this was before social security and they were just looking at people. Names change when they come to the state at Ellis Island. My wife grandfather was named Williams and when they called him by his middle name he like it and told them that he was a Ellis. Did not have to go to court to change your name. If we had known our forefathers names, our childrn would have different names. There is a book in the Library or should be called Tennessee Cousins. It seems that everyone went through Tennessee... and remember Tennessee used to be a east coast state! That is why you have many spelling of names. Not a family name or otherwise, just a name. As one blogger said her grandmother was named Willie. My mothers name Was willie and my wifes mother was Millie. We did not name our children Willie Millie!
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:53 AM
 
Location: 2016 Clown Car...fka: Wisconsin
738 posts, read 771,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waynewallace View Post
...Names change when they come to the state at Ellis Island...
Will this myth ever end???

No, Family Names Were Not Changed at Ellis Island - Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

RVcook
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