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Old 03-28-2010, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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Yeah, I'm disappointed because I can't get some of my lines back to before the 18th century so it is amusing to see these celebs get all excited about something that happened just a few generations back.
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Old 03-29-2010, 02:21 AM
 
11,439 posts, read 19,468,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinynot View Post
I watched Matthew Broderick a couple of nights ago. It was interesting, I didn't know there were other celebs doing it too.
It really amazes me how some people know nothing about any of their ancestors. All we ever did when I was small was visit relatives and listen to stories about my parents childhoods and the people the lived among.
I think it is sad that people don't know about their history.
I got quite emotional about Broderick's finding out about his civil war grandfather -- just a few months ago I discovered that mine was a POW at Confederate Camp Lawton... and died.

And about families talking... I wish I knew why they don't. But they don't. My great grandparents were both dead when my grandmother hit 16 -- her mom was gone (I assume) by 1900, because she was living with her grandmother (mother's mother) who raised her, and Granny lived with my grandmother until she died -- which was after my father married my mom.

Not one of my grandmother's six children knew their grandparent's names. I found them, last year.

There has GOT to be a story there, somewhere.... even the dates on the headstones have got to be wrong. I have census records and news articles and obituaries, and they don't jibe with the records....

But it wouldn't be fun if there wasn't a puzzle to unravel....
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Old 03-29-2010, 03:30 AM
 
11,685 posts, read 13,105,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinynot View Post
I watched Matthew Broderick a couple of nights ago. It was interesting, I didn't know there were other celebs doing it too.
It really amazes me how some people know nothing about any of their ancestors. All we ever did when I was small was visit relatives and listen to stories about my parents childhoods and the people the lived among.
I think it is sad that people don't know about their history.
Ditto. It was a fascinating part of life, and I was curious about my family.

I am totally gobsmacked when someone hasn't a clue who his grandparents were, or anything about them.
I think the fact that youngsters grow up totally detached from the world of nature as their playground and as equally detached from any sense of their human roots, helps explain why so many modern people are just floating corks pushed this way and that way in the world with no ballast or sense.

A kid who doesn't know about earthworms or bugs or meadows, or his grandparents is growing up an amputee from life.
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Old 03-29-2010, 06:19 PM
bjh
Status: "Glad it's November." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,237 posts, read 22,811,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Foosball View Post
I got the impression that I was watching an Ancestry.com infomercial.
I was a little taken aback by the obvious plug, but have still enjoyed the series so far.

They should just be more open about it. Say something like: "This show is brought to you in part by ancestry.com." That's the kind of acknowledgement generally given when a company sponsors a show.
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Old 03-29-2010, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Fort Smith, Arkansas
1,466 posts, read 3,699,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjh View Post
I was a little taken aback by the obvious plug, but have still enjoyed the series so far.

They should just be more open about it. Say something like: "This show is brought to you in part by ancestry.com." That's the kind of acknowledgement generally given when a company sponsors a show.
It is the Mormon conspiracy.
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Old 03-29-2010, 07:31 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,671 posts, read 42,807,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Foosball View Post
I got the impression that I was watching an Ancestry.com infomercial.
Well, yes, you were.
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Old 03-29-2010, 07:45 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,671 posts, read 42,807,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
I got quite emotional about Broderick's finding out about his civil war grandfather -- just a few months ago I discovered that mine was a POW at Confederate Camp Lawton... and died.

And about families talking... I wish I knew why they don't. But they don't. My great grandparents were both dead when my grandmother hit 16 -- her mom was gone (I assume) by 1900, because she was living with her grandmother (mother's mother) who raised her, and Granny lived with my grandmother until she died -- which was after my father married my mom.

Not one of my grandmother's six children knew their grandparent's names. I found them, last year.

There has GOT to be a story there, somewhere.... even the dates on the headstones have got to be wrong. I have census records and news articles and obituaries, and they don't jibe with the records....

But it wouldn't be fun if there wasn't a puzzle to unravel....
It's weird that parents don't talk about their parents and grandparents to their children, I wonder why this was? I wish I had the chance to go back and ask my grand's and parents things that I wonder about now. I took on the task of doing a lot of the family genealogy and found out things that were interesting, but there was no reason why these things couldn't have been shared with us kids.
Things I didn't know..my grandfather was the Treasurer of one on the major companies in our town. His wife, my grandmother, was left a rich widow when he died and so was responsible for keeping many other relatives afloat during the depression. This same grandfather had a twin brother who I never knew about, but he never married and in the 1930 census was a chauffeur. I eagerly await the 1940 census to see what became of him.
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Old 03-29-2010, 08:12 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,368,217 times
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I once sat down with one of my grandmothers and asked her to go over her family history with me. (The other grandmother often talked about it and had already written a lot of it down, bless her.)

We spent several days sitting at her dining room table. The first thing she said was, "We've had so many tragedies. Too many." She then started telling me the stories that my own mother had only whispered about. Stories about people and events everyone was ashamed of.

My grandmother had saved the relevant newspaper clippings. She had photos of the people involved. She told me how everyone was related. She'd had 11 bothers and sisters and she was the person who knew how it all "fit". I'm so thankful she would do that with me. She was glad I was interested.

The oddest thing was when she brought out all the old family photos there were a lot of pictures of people in their coffins. Photographing the dead was apparently done so the photos could be shown to family members who lived in other areas. But I can tell you, looking at wedding and birthday pictures then suddenly seeing a 60 year old photo of a deceased relative is a shock and a half.
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Old 03-29-2010, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
4,585 posts, read 10,489,409 times
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I'm enjoying it. I hope someone out there gets the genealogy bug and has answers to my family's brick walls.

They do use Ancestry.com on the show but they also use many many other resources. I think it's well balanced and gives a glimpse of what genealogy is all about.

So far each of the segments has been very interesting and Mathew Broadrick's gave me some new ideas on where to look for info on my Gr gr gr grandfather who died in the civil war in Cumberland Gap.
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Old 03-29-2010, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Fort Smith, Arkansas
1,466 posts, read 3,699,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReturningWest View Post
They do use Ancestry.com on the show but they also use many many other resources. I think it's well balanced and gives a glimpse of what genealogy is all about.
FWIW, the only one I watched was the Emmitt Smith show. And ancestry.com might have jumped out at me because that is the site that I regularly use to do research.
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