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Old 03-06-2011, 01:33 AM
 
28 posts, read 74,164 times
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At what point do you say screw it and purchase a new vehicle instead of towing it behind a moving van? I might be moving from CA to NE in April for a new job. Chances are it could be short notice (i.e. 2-3 weeks) so I need to formulate a plan now, just in case.

OPTION 1: Rent a Penske truck and tow my 15-year old Toyota Truck behind it.
Because I'm single and not bringing any appliances along, a 12-ft Penske truck would be too big. You need a 16-ft Penske truck if you're towing a vehicle. Including AAA & online discounts, taxes, LDW and insurance, a vehicle trailer ($350), $4/gallon gasoline at 9 MPG, lodging and food = $2660 is a best case scenario.

OPTION 2: Pack all my stuff into ABF Relocube(s) and purchase a new vehicle in Nebraska.

One ABF Relocube would run $1197; two would cost $1725. Add in a one-way plane ticket and that's $1900-2000 and an extra 3 days saved.

Here's the dilemma: My 1996 Toyota truck has low mileage (98,000) and is reliable, in fair shape. The Kelly Blue Book value is about $2500. It may require work to survive in a harsh winter climate and I don't see myself keeping it much longer than 6-12 months. Taking it with me would cost an extra $700 and three days of my time.

Would you spend $700 to move a vehicle worth (at most) $2500?
What if spending the $700 and keeping the old truck longer meant you could purchase a house sooner?
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Old 03-06-2011, 01:41 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
9,611 posts, read 18,809,901 times
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Sell the truck where you're at and then use the money to buy a similar one when you get to where you're going. When getting a used car it's always best to get one that is popular in the area you are in. So find a nice example of whatever is commonly driven in your new area and you'll always be able to find used parts inexpensively at the junk yard. There are also a lot of climatic differences between the two areas so a car selected for one area probably wouldn't be the best choice for the other area.
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Old 03-06-2011, 03:03 AM
 
28 posts, read 74,164 times
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For this new job - if I get it - reliable transportation is extremely important. I'd be on call 24/7/365. Having a used car doesn't bother me, it's just that I'm leery of relying on a used car I'm unfamiliar with. Does that make sense? I'll need reliable transportation the second I move there...
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Old 03-06-2011, 04:42 AM
 
18,853 posts, read 31,647,356 times
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Just keep the car you have now, and if you are definitely offered a job, get rid of all possessions except for a few boxes, fly to your new place, buy a car there. Live close to work, on a bus/metro line .
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Old 03-06-2011, 12:19 PM
 
28 posts, read 74,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
Just keep the car you have now, and if you are definitely offered a job, get rid of all possessions except for a few boxes, fly to your new place, buy a car there. Live close to work, on a bus/metro line .
There's no way I could downsize to a few boxes, unfortunately.

If hired, I plan to live close to work, but a bus/metro line won't help when called in to work during the middle of the night.
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Old 03-06-2011, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Southern California
3,115 posts, read 7,232,093 times
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It appears you could go either way, and be fine, so it's just a question of do you want a new car now or later?

But then in your very last line, you wrote...

Quote:
Originally Posted by desertrat22 View Post
What if spending the $700 and keeping the old truck longer meant you could purchase a house sooner?
If it means you can afford a house sooner, then I'd take the old truck, for sure! Even if you don't choose to buy a house any time soon, just knowing you could is a big enough reason to make it worth keeping the older truck.
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Old 03-06-2011, 08:28 PM
 
28 posts, read 74,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bouncethelight View Post
If it means you can afford a house sooner, then I'd take the old truck, for sure! Even if you don't choose to buy a house any time soon, just knowing you could is a big enough reason to make it worth keeping the older truck.
I'm with you here, believe me. The job is such that I absolutely must have reliable transportation. Car breaks down and I show up late -- they will fire me. As I said before, I'm not sure the old truck could survive in the winter climate without some work done to it. For job security purposes, purchasing a new vehicle might be essential. I don't know...

I could pay cash for a new car tomorrow if I wanted to, or use the same money (about $30,000) for a house downpayment 6 months down the line. Modest homes back there run $75,000-125,000. Apartment rent would run $800-1200 per month, including parking and utilities. Despite the advice I've been given, "never finance a depreciable asset" (meaning a car) I think I would save much more in financing by using that money toward a house, not a car.
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Old 03-07-2011, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,184 posts, read 44,786,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desertrat22 View Post
For this new job - if I get it - reliable transportation is extremely important. I'd be on call 24/7/365. Having a used car doesn't bother me, it's just that I'm leery of relying on a used car I'm unfamiliar with. Does that make sense? I'll need reliable transportation the second I move there...
I don't see a California Dude having a good time driving his own truck out in the salt and ice of a NE winter, 24/7/365. If your job is OK where you are you might want to think really hard before going to the Midwest.

I served my time in Iowa, thanks. Never again!

Seriously this does not sound like a job that I would want anyway.
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Old 03-07-2011, 07:47 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,769,329 times
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Beleieve me whe you actauly move that 700 dollars would seem ike much of a hit for overall cost. It noramlly cost alot more tha you poaln to actually move.
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