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Old 08-15-2011, 08:47 PM
 
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Anyone ever end up homeless during a move to a new location? If so, how did you survive and did you ever get your life back in order?
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Old 08-16-2011, 04:58 AM
 
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3/4 of the time as a kid when I was "moving" it was from one homeless situation to another. One particularly long situation was when I was 15. We were supposed to be moving to new mexico so my parents signed me out of school and got everything ready to transfer. Days go by and we still don't move. It'd been over 10 days, and in the school I was in, 10 absences meant you automatically failed your classes. Once I knew for sure that my parents weren't moving, they moved into a drug house and I slept on the floor of my grandpa's christian library. That said, even though she'd done it so many times before, she refused to write up a fake lease in order that I could go to the latest local school district.

I was a 3.9 GPA student. I wasn't about to return to the school I was already at, fail a semester, and graduate a semester late, so I told myself I'd figure something out.

Under Michigan law, I couldn't. That was a VERY, VERY interesting summer, probably the most intense period of my life, ever. I lived at the library, trying to read as many books as I could in order to, I guess, prevent myself from becoming incompetent in the world. I figured it was the perfect time to get deeply involved with my faith (I was raised in a family of protestant pastors, my grandfather who I was living with included) and when I couldn't find a devotional that suited me one night at 3am while looking through his books, I decided I'd just flip to random pages, point to random verses, and read them in a haphazard manner.

To avoid a flame war I won't go into details, but because of what I read in the bible after about a month, I eventually realized I could no longer be the fundamentalist I was raised to be. I had too much respect for myself to do what I was asked to do. So all the while in the midst of sleeping on a tile floor every night and being a 3.9 GPA, supposed-to-soon-to-go-to-the-University-of-Michigan high school drop out, I dropped my faith. And THEN, I flew out to see my father for the first time in 8 years. Like said, very intense summer.

fall rolls around, still not in school, now accustomed to being an atheist, and things roll on. Next june my mother and stepdad come across some money and move us to Wisconsin. I immediately checked into their homeschool laws and learned I could create my own curriculum, write my own transcript (NO joke) with the assistance of my parents, and graduate.

I did exactly that. I got into college no sweat, which is where I am today, a semester away from graduation at 19. Cheers. You can get through it.


**edit...

Oh, and I suppose I should add that in the 2 years I've come back from studying abroad each spring to take my summer classes and move into the dorms, they have not ONCE had my room ready for me on the date the contract specified they would. In turn, I wound up being allowed to store my two suitcases in their on-campus storage for free until the latest dorm was "cleaned," but in terms of where I stayed, I was on my own. Last May this was 10 days, and this year it was 3. I wasn't about to dish out $40+ a night for a hotel. So, I packed my backpack with some clothes, pop-top cans of soup, a plastic spoon, a wash cloth, and some shampoo, and hid inside the computer lab at night and slept underneath a bench in a shadow in the back corner of one room. I washed my hair in a bathroom sink each morning (as well as my body, at least to what extent I could with a wash cloth and no shower) , changed my clothes, and went to class like everyone else, just with an unusually full backpack to lug around.
. . . . I chose one of the cheapest universities in the country to go to, and I guess that's what I get. . . . .

Last edited by Dr_Pepper; 08-16-2011 at 05:13 AM..
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Old 08-16-2011, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Kountze, Texas
1,013 posts, read 1,153,801 times
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Oh my Dr. Pepper - I'm sad that you lost your faith in God - but pleased to hear how you have survived and still able to graduate from college at 19. Good luck in all you do.
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Old 08-16-2011, 03:48 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,665 posts, read 8,952,951 times
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I did move to a town with no place to live but had a job. I lived in a hotel for a week. It was very interesting to say the least, since I didn't have an address to fill out on my W2 forms.
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Old 08-16-2011, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Kountze, Texas
1,013 posts, read 1,153,801 times
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closest we have come is being in a hotel and needing to find permanent housing in order to register children in school. We weren't quite homeless - but felt like it.
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Old 08-16-2011, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,179 posts, read 9,387,993 times
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In the late 70's, I had separated from my husband. I had taken our son and left my husband in a jail on Sandia base in New Mexico, where he ended up being convicted of robbing some houses on base. Well, it was the recession, and there were no jobs. I was struggling to find a job and raise my son, when my husband showed up at my parents' home and 'made nice'. One of our good friends said there were jobs in Columbus, Ohio, and my husband wanted us to move there for a 'new start'. We loaded everything into an old Dodge pickup with a camper shell and headed North. We got to Asheville, NC, when the truck - quit. We had no money to get it fixed, not even to eat off of. We lived in a campground for 2 weeks, and every day I was taking sponge baths (it was November) in the campground bathroom, dressing up, and going out to look for a job. There was a field nearby that had collards growing in it and that is all we had to eat, once a day. One day I met this incredible guy who wanted to hire a couple - my husband for outside caretaker, me for inside domestic - at a NC farm. We got a house of our own and a stipend. I immediately went to work cleaning the 'big house' and doing the laundry, etc. When we got that first paycheck, my husband decided it was time to get the truck fixed and leave and head to Columbus; the work was 'too hard' for him. We left in the dead of night. I hated to do that to someone who had literally saved our lives, but my husband then was a real bum; really did think the world owed him a living, never admitted he'd done wrong by stealing from our friends or that nice man who had taken a chance on us.

Two years later I divorced that worthless bum and went on to work many jobs, open and own two businesses, travel the country on business and pleasure, remarry to a man who adopted my two children from my ex, and raise not only them, but our daughter and some foster children. But always in the back of my mind was Scarlett O'Hara's line from Gone With the Wind, "As God is My Witness, I'll Never be Hungry Again!" That is what has driven me ever since to never go hungry, never do without, and never, ever rely on or trust any one else for my needs or wants. This is what drives me to work so hard, and what helps me enjoy what I have and work ever harder for what I want. I know what it is like to be homeless, alone, and terrified of what will happen next, or even if I or my child will starve. And I will never NOT plan, never NOT plot, never NOT take advantage of every single opportunity, and I will never be homeless or hungry again. Even sitting in a 100 year old farmhouse on 60 acres now, surrounded by and raising my farm animals, training my cattle dog, working my part-time job, painting and quilting and sewing and planting and canning and putting by, I'm always thinking of and planning for the future.
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Old 08-16-2011, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Went around the corner & now I'm lost!!!!
1,550 posts, read 3,064,122 times
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WOW DP & SCG!!!!!!! I respect your ability to endure and be persistent in you lives against ALL odds! The average person would have given up or tried to steal or manipulate their way through those difficulties but YOU TWO became resourceful instead.

I once had a patient tell me 20 years ago that if there was another Depression, my generation would not survive it. At first I got offended because I was good at saving and making ends meet but as I thought about it, she was right. Ever since then, I always give myself the scenario of "What if I had to live on the bare bones of existence. What would I do? Because of her I look at "things" differently, learned how to do without alot of things and continue to learn from that simple statement.

Your examples show people that Life is doable; no matter the circumstances
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Old 08-16-2011, 10:24 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,665 posts, read 8,952,951 times
Reputation: 10938
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
In the late 70's, I had separated from my husband. I had taken our son and left my husband in a jail on Sandia base in New Mexico, where he ended up being convicted of robbing some houses on base. Well, it was the recession, and there were no jobs. I was struggling to find a job and raise my son, when my husband showed up at my parents' home and 'made nice'. One of our good friends said there were jobs in Columbus, Ohio, and my husband wanted us to move there for a 'new start'. We loaded everything into an old Dodge pickup with a camper shell and headed North. We got to Asheville, NC, when the truck - quit. We had no money to get it fixed, not even to eat off of. We lived in a campground for 2 weeks, and every day I was taking sponge baths (it was November) in the campground bathroom, dressing up, and going out to look for a job. There was a field nearby that had collards growing in it and that is all we had to eat, once a day. One day I met this incredible guy who wanted to hire a couple - my husband for outside caretaker, me for inside domestic - at a NC farm. We got a house of our own and a stipend. I immediately went to work cleaning the 'big house' and doing the laundry, etc. When we got that first paycheck, my husband decided it was time to get the truck fixed and leave and head to Columbus; the work was 'too hard' for him. We left in the dead of night. I hated to do that to someone who had literally saved our lives, but my husband then was a real bum; really did think the world owed him a living, never admitted he'd done wrong by stealing from our friends or that nice man who had taken a chance on us.

Two years later I divorced that worthless bum and went on to work many jobs, open and own two businesses, travel the country on business and pleasure, remarry to a man who adopted my two children from my ex, and raise not only them, but our daughter and some foster children. But always in the back of my mind was Scarlett O'Hara's line from Gone With the Wind, "As God is My Witness, I'll Never be Hungry Again!" That is what has driven me ever since to never go hungry, never do without, and never, ever rely on or trust any one else for my needs or wants. This is what drives me to work so hard, and what helps me enjoy what I have and work ever harder for what I want. I know what it is like to be homeless, alone, and terrified of what will happen next, or even if I or my child will starve. And I will never NOT plan, never NOT plot, never NOT take advantage of every single opportunity, and I will never be homeless or hungry again. Even sitting in a 100 year old farmhouse on 60 acres now, surrounded by and raising my farm animals, training my cattle dog, working my part-time job, painting and quilting and sewing and planting and canning and putting by, I'm always thinking of and planning for the future.
That is such an inspiring story. After living in poverty my first year out of college I vowed never to do that again. That is so great you pulled through and made it.
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Old 08-17-2011, 05:11 PM
 
5,244 posts, read 4,284,830 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by House4kids View Post
closest we have come is being in a hotel and needing to find permanent housing in order to register children in school. We weren't quite homeless - but felt like it.
this was our situation...for the really homeless, I'm sure there are shelters in the city that you could be in and hope things are better.
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Old 08-17-2011, 11:15 PM
 
171 posts, read 368,614 times
Reputation: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by therewego View Post
this was our situation...for the really homeless, I'm sure there are shelters in the city that you could be in and hope things are better.
Yeah, that's what everyone thinks (I don't mean to be condescending, I'm just saying becuase i was one of them) until they wind up in the situation actually looking for a shelter. In truth, 1: there are rarely spaces available. 2: there's often a fee comparable to staying in a hostel +chores, curfews, and restrictions on practically ALL facets of your life like you wouldn't believe (e.g. I wasn't allowed to openly possess a laptop, read Cosmo, sleep past 6am) 3: in the ones that have space available, you'll be lucky if their requirements match your demographics (e.g. women with children, battered women with children, single men, drug-dependent men, the mentally ill, etc). For example, there's one homeless shelter where I live--the only one in a 2-hour radius until you reach Pueblo, CO--and they have an unstated policy of only a particular race and employment demographic during the potato season. I've had to advise numerous friends of mine on how they can sleep in their cars at Walmart or sleep by a particular tree-covered hideaway spot on campus next to the Rio Grande, or sleep in the spot I did (where I now often see others sleeping occasionally). Getting into a shelter is NO easy feat.

Out of all the times I've been homeless--mainly during my childhood--my family got into a homeless shelter ONCE, and this was last Christmas when they got evicted on Christmas eve. while I was visiting for the holiday.
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