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Old 03-22-2012, 05:39 AM
 
841 posts, read 1,656,866 times
Reputation: 1163

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My cousin, his wife and child are in the same boat. They have to go somewhere in a month because they would not renew their lease, no jobs in their town (only moved for the job) and it's a depressed, rust belt area.

He lost his job in January. Again, they moved there for the job, so he has no connections or love for the area they are in now.

They've moved many times. It's the way of the world now. You have to be willing to bite the bullet.

You are one person, right? Are you moving alone?
Then go for it.

One person can live in a small apt or even a rooming house. You can get a temp job or 2 part time jobs.

If you are unhappy move. Nothing is guaranteed except life is too short to be miserable.

Good luck.
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Old 03-22-2012, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,895 posts, read 4,553,072 times
Reputation: 957
Indianapolis, IN Jobs on CareerBuilder.com
We have the nations most affordable housing market. Lowest cost of living of any major US city.
Within a days drive to 75% of the US population and the First northern city to be on the Super Bowl host rotation list. the Media praised Indianapolis for hosting Super Bowl 46 and there is talk of another one in 2018 or 2020.
Very friendly down to earth culture and a strong business climate with good job growth.
Also only a 3 hour drive to Chicago/Lake Michigan too and the worlds largest Childrens museum and the 2 largest sporting events are held in Indy every year. The Indy 500 and the Brickyard 400.

I recommend the Indianapolis area to help you settle down and get a good job and house
http://www.homes.com/Real_Estate/IN/City/INDIANAPOLIS/ is a sample of our real estate market to give you an idea.
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Old 03-22-2012, 09:30 PM
 
4,043 posts, read 2,994,270 times
Reputation: 1952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragazza2011 View Post
Quick bio: born in Chicago, lived in Evergreen, Littleton, Highlands Ranch, Denver CO, Las Vegas, SW FL, Milan, Italy and Dallas, TX. I'm 32, female, single, no pets, no kids, no boyfriend, some bills, living with my mom.

I was laid off last week, further adding to my Dallas nightmare. I want to make a run for it on $3,100 and plenty of credit. I'm not sure exactly where to go. I want to live in a sunny, snowless climate, fun nightlife, health conscious and educated people.

1.) Denver - I have friends back there and a few possible job leads. However, I HATE snow and cold weather. I left Denver for many reasons and aren't fond of thought of returning. But after 8 months of hell in Dallas, most places look fantastic when compared to this place.

2.) Phoenix - unsure about the job market and if it would have enough going on as far as nightlife or educated people. Love the weather.

3.) San Diego - have a friend who submitted my resume for a job paying around $40k in La Jolla. Unsure of the job market down there and if my finances or that job would even be feasible?!

Suggestions, comments or thoughts appreciated.
Leave Dallas but this doesn't mean you have to leave Texas! San Antonio is much cheaper than Austin, and yet close enough to Austin for a jaunt there anytime you wish. There are distant 'burbs, I call them to San A. and they have some wonderful apartments to live in, like in La Vernia area. Someone dear to me just rented a huge, two bedroom, two bath apartment that is only one of 20 units in the country, only five years old, master bath large enough to even put a small kitchen table in, beautiful tile floors and moldings, etc...for only 800. a month!~

Yet close enough to SA to provide a large offering of jobs.
Lastly, you are still in Texas and have all of the freedoms and rights to self defense even if only property and not necessarily life is threatened.

I wish you well~
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Old 03-23-2012, 05:44 AM
 
13,293 posts, read 25,459,767 times
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When I was young and raw and living in Pittsburgh, while the steel mills were still operating but were beginning to close down, I remember reading about the various industries closing down and how terrible it was for communities, and so on. Like I said, young and raw and not very connected, and wondered, why is it such a big deal and just leave for where the jobs are (which, if I remember, where around Houston and the Gulf Coast then).
A lot more seasoned now, I realize how sad it is for community ties to be smashed and maybe families separated for good, and people being more transient, especially with kids, and how that isn't good for people, families, or communities.
Dug in as I am in my area, I still wrestle with how to feel community and a sense of home.
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Old 03-23-2012, 01:33 PM
 
841 posts, read 1,656,866 times
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This is very true, Brightdoglover.

In our family we have lived away from family (both sides) and had other relatives live far away as well so there aren't many chances for the kids to know each other or their aunts or uncles or cousins.

It's so hard when you have to move around for work and can't build up a sense of home.
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Old 03-25-2012, 11:26 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,298,631 times
Reputation: 3517
Here's an idea. Find a job then move.

Unfortunately the sunny, snowless cities with nightlife, etc, are the ones that are hardest to find a job in.
If they were easy to get a job in, the whole country would live there.

Picking up and moving on a whim may seem exciting but a year from now, long after you've burned through your savings and racked up a mountain of credit card debt, the stress and your financial woes will make it impossible to enjoy the weather.

Quote:
I am nervous to run again and not find a job, but I'm not sure how much more positivity I can muster up after this debacle and continue to look for work here.
You need a little less positivity and a little more reality.
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Old 03-25-2012, 06:32 PM
 
2,478 posts, read 4,850,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
Here's an idea. Find a job then move.

Unfortunately the sunny, snowless cities with nightlife, etc, are the ones that are hardest to find a job in.
If they were easy to get a job in, the whole country would live there.

Picking up and moving on a whim may seem exciting but a year from now, long after you've burned through your savings and racked up a mountain of credit card debt, the stress and your financial woes will make it impossible to enjoy the weather.


You need a little less positivity and a little more reality.
She doesn't have a niche career, therefore no one is going to hire her since she is not local.
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Old 03-26-2012, 07:58 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,298,631 times
Reputation: 3517
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ankhharu View Post
She doesn't have a niche career, therefore no one is going to hire her since she is not local.
As an employer myself, I can say that isn't true.

I'm in an area that's hard to find even unskilled workers that at least have some brains. I'd be more open to hiring someone who was is in a different state and interested in moving to the area. Although if they just up and moved to my state which has double digit unemployment, I'd lose all confidence they have any common sense and common sense is the number one requirement for any position at my business.
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Old 03-27-2012, 05:46 AM
 
2,478 posts, read 4,850,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
As an employer myself, I can say that isn't true.

I'm in an area that's hard to find even unskilled workers that at least have some brains. I'd be more open to hiring someone who was is in a different state and interested in moving to the area. Although if they just up and moved to my state which has double digit unemployment, I'd lose all confidence they have any common sense and common sense is the number one requirement for any position at my business.
You are alone then. I've attempted to acquire employment prior to all my moves. When I'm fortunate enough to get a phone interview, the interview is quickly ended when they find out that I'm not local and I can't come in for a face to face the very next day. Sometimes I get hung up on. I spent 2 years trying to get a job in California prior to moving. Never happened, so I took off to Chicago. I got a job 3 weeks after I arrived.
I know a dozen people who have moved without acquiring employment prior to moving and being just fine. Myself included. I've asked employers why they won't hire out of state and the most common reply is "you don't know if they are ever going to make the move".
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Old 03-27-2012, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,659,551 times
Reputation: 32292
Per se, there is nothing wrong with moving in order to leave a place one doesn't like, but I must say that the OP (Ragazza2011) sounds spoiled and self-indulgent. First, in the OP, she was "laid off". Then later, in post #9, she admits she quit her job (and that's the reason she is not eligible for unemployment). The stated criteria for the new location make it appear that there is an unrealistic search for an earthly paradise ("sunny, snowless climate, fun nightlife, health-conscious and educated people"). The rejection of Austin and San Antonio just because they are still in Texas (and as different as they are from Dallas) bespeaks an emotional, as oppossed to a rational and analytical, approach.

Now before Ragazza2011 and her lawyer and spokesperson in this thread (whose user name escapes me right now) get their panties all in a bunch and call this a personal attack, I submit that it is relevant to the OP's stated problem and to her search for a solution. What if another job can be found in Dallas, with the express purpose of building up that fund considerably above $3200 in order to have a better cushion for leaving Dallas? This ought to be doable given that she is living with her mom. So I am agreeing that the goal (leaving Dallas) is legitimate. I am just questioning the whole tone of the approach.
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