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Old 04-06-2012, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,683 posts, read 23,513,164 times
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If you are moving to a popular place where there are also many others relocating to, you will have difficulties just picking up and moving without funds to fall back on if you don't have a job waiting for you. Competition in some places for jobs and housing is fierce.

I would say that how much you want to gamble everything will go your way will depend upon where you want to go. In these times, it isn't wise to just pick up and move without money and a plan.
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Old 04-08-2012, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Temporarily in Niagara Falls, Ont. Canada
167 posts, read 711,932 times
Reputation: 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
If you are moving to a popular place where there are also many others relocating to, you will have difficulties just picking up and moving without funds to fall back on if you don't have a job waiting for you. Competition in some places for jobs and housing is fierce.

I would say that how much you want to gamble everything will go your way will depend upon where you want to go. In these times, it isn't wise to just pick up and move without money and a plan.
Bah! Where's your sense of adventure?

I know, it's good to air on the side of caution sometimes, but if one does so to excess, no move or action will be taken. I just hate to see people over analyze and eventually talk themselves out something, and always be wondering what it would have been like...
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Old 04-08-2012, 06:44 PM
 
439 posts, read 543,407 times
Reputation: 513
Quote:
Originally Posted by xnyer View Post
I'm in my 60's now and look back and laugh over the times in my life I have done just what you are contemplating. You are the right age to "stretch out your wings" so to speak, so do it while you are young. The years are coming in your life when you'll likely marry, have children, struggle in a career and do all of things those before you have done. Now is your golden opportunity, because you are seeing the world through "new" eyes. While you are well advised to count the cost of what you want to do, don't obsess over it. You will be amazed at how resourceful you can be and you will find a way. It's all about growth my young friend, new experiences, new friends, perhaps even that special one who is the love of your life or that special place that you just feel connected to. Even if you end up flat broke and busted in some place you can't stand, you pick yourself up and keep on moving. The worst possible thing is to wake up one day when you're old and realize what you have missed in life. As far as what you've left behind, true friends will always be friends, your parents will always love you and some things will never change. You have a destiny---go for it!!
Thank you sir! I am contemplating a move myself, and this is exactly what I needed to hear. At the ripe, young age of 23, I am running out of time.
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,683 posts, read 23,513,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustSomeGuy73 View Post
Bah! Where's your sense of adventure?

I know, it's good to air on the side of caution sometimes, but if one does so to excess, no move or action will be taken. I just hate to see people over analyze and eventually talk themselves out something, and always be wondering what it would have been like...
Sense of adventure evaporates pretty quickly when you don't have a job to buy food or pay the rent. I live in a city where jobs are scarcer than most (fierce competition) and have seen people being forced to move back to the place they moved from because they couldn't make it here.

It's been hearbreaking in every case.
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Old 04-10-2012, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Temporarily in Niagara Falls, Ont. Canada
167 posts, read 711,932 times
Reputation: 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Sense of adventure evaporates pretty quickly when you don't have a job to buy food or pay the rent. I live in a city where jobs are scarcer than most (fierce competition) and have seen people being forced to move back to the place they moved from because they couldn't make it here.

It's been hearbreaking in every case.
I'd rather figure out a way to make it work, or try another city. Ideally I would research it ahead of time and be prepared to live frugally at first (have a few month's reserve cash if possible) - rather than wait till I'm broke and move "home." I'd rather see the new city as my new home.
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Dallas TX
14,975 posts, read 21,570,929 times
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If the ecomomy was better in AZ I would say go for it. The cost of living is incredibly cheap compared to NY. However, the jobs are scarce. If you can get something set up beforehand go for it!
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
538 posts, read 1,653,835 times
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Foolish. No matter what your age. At least have a back up plan. Arizona is a very depressed state right now. I wouldn't advise taking that chance unless you have at least a roof over your head and some money in savings.
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,683 posts, read 23,513,164 times
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It's fine for older people, and I am old so I can say this, to be talking about the adventure of their own youth when they just jumped in a car and moved to another city without any plans but were successful.But they have to understand that today is much different than yesterday.

The reality is, unless one is in some very high tech field or in the medical profession, jobs in many if not most states will be difficult to come by. Fast food jobs or dishiwashing jobs
and the like have people lined up waiting for an opening. The adventure ends when you are hungry and cannot buy food.

Next door to a friend of mine there are people living in tents in the back yard. It is illegal to do so but they have nowhere else to go. I wonder if they started out from another city thinking they were on an adventure.
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Old 04-10-2012, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,179 posts, read 9,371,142 times
Reputation: 9546
I realize that facts don't matter much to folks who are emotionally charged, but WTH - here's some info that might be useful for other readers who are making a practical plan.

The U.S. Census Bureau’s most recent report reveals a sobering reality: Arizona has the second highest poverty rate in the nation. This shameful distinction calls attention to a long-standing social problem that has been exacerbated by challenging economic times. Today, many Arizonans are experiencing need for the first time, and must seek assistance in ways they had never imagined. Increased demand for emergency food assistance is clear evidence of their plight.
What are the trends?
Arizona Indicators has been tracking trends for three food assistance demand indicators – households receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP; formerly Food Stamps) benefits, pounds of food distributed by Arizona food banks, and number of emergency food boxes distributed. Each shows a recent – and sharp – increase.
The number of Arizona households receiving SNAP benefits increased by 26.9% between 2008 and 2009, an increase of over 66,000 households. Prior to 2008, the number of Arizona households receiving SNAP assistance was relatively stable, with only modest increases over the years. Since the end of 2009 through September 2010, SNAP participation by Arizona household has grown another 6.3% to record high numbers.
Similarly, the number of pounds distributed by Arizona food banks increased alarmingly - 26.7% between 2009 and 2010. That constituted an increase of over 28 million pounds distributed over a one year period. Previously, the number of pounds distributed was relatively stable over the past decade, except for a dip in 2008 which experts attribute to the early onset of the recession causing cutbacks in corporate donations, the reduction of federal funding prior to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and one-time distribution challenges for the Arizona Statewide Gleaning Project in the Nogales region.

Why not move to a place where not even the locals are getting jobs? Why not have a "What, me worry?" attitude about becoming a drain on some other state's financial resources and current taxpaying population? After all, they won't mind a bit, and will surely welcome you with open arms, because you are so special and so different.

You betcha that, when I was younger, I packed up the 1959 pickup with a homemade camper shell and moved, and didn't care, and found jobs and a place to live and a whole new life. Now, though, reality is starting to sink in - and it isn't the reality of "Gee, I did it, you can too!" but the reality that having a plan, a marketable skill, and a real job with a real roof and real food matter in this economy.

Go ahead! Listen to the cheerleaders! Whoo hoo! What could possibly go wrong?
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Old 04-10-2012, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,683 posts, read 23,513,164 times
Reputation: 35325
[quote=SCGranny;23801294]I realize that facts don't matter much to folks who are emotionally charged, but WTH - here's some info that might be useful for other readers who are making a practical plan.

The U.S. Census Bureau’s most recent report reveals a sobering reality: Arizona has the second highest poverty rate in the nation. This shameful distinction calls attention to a long-standing social problem that has been exacerbated by challenging economic times. Today, many Arizonans are experiencing need for the first time, and must seek assistance in ways they had never imagined. Increased demand for emergency food assistance is clear evidence of their plight.
What are the trends?
Arizona Indicators has been tracking trends for three food assistance demand indicators – households receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP; formerly Food Stamps) benefits, pounds of food distributed by Arizona food banks, and number of emergency food boxes distributed. Each shows a recent – and sharp – increase.
The number of Arizona households receiving SNAP benefits increased by 26.9% between 2008 and 2009, an increase of over 66,000 households. Prior to 2008, the number of Arizona households receiving SNAP assistance was relatively stable, with only modest increases over the years. Since the end of 2009 through September 2010, SNAP participation by Arizona household has grown another 6.3% to record high numbers.
Similarly, the number of pounds distributed by Arizona food banks increased alarmingly - 26.7% between 2009 and 2010. That constituted an increase of over 28 million pounds distributed over a one year period. Previously, the number of pounds distributed was relatively stable over the past decade, except for a dip in 2008 which experts attribute to the early onset of the recession causing cutbacks in corporate donations, the reduction of federal funding prior to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and one-time distribution challenges for the Arizona Statewide Gleaning Project in the Nogales region.

Why not move to a place where not even the locals are getting jobs? Why not have a "What, me worry?" attitude about becoming a drain on some other state's financial resources and current taxpaying population? After all, they won't mind a bit, and will surely welcome you with open arms, because you are so special and so different.

You betcha that, when I was younger, I packed up the 1959 pickup with a homemade camper shell and moved, and didn't care, and found jobs and a place to live and a whole new life. Now, though, reality is starting to sink in - and it isn't the reality of "Gee, I did it, you can too!" but the reality that having a plan, a marketable skill, and a real job with a real roof and real food matter in this economy.

Go ahead! Listen to the cheerleaders! Whoo hoo! What could possibly go wrong?[/quote]

You deserve 100 reps for this. Sorry I could only give you one. The same can be said for Oregon. It's madness, I tells 'ya, madness! People used to move away from places that were overcrowded, overpriced and had few job opportunities. Now it appears just the opposite is occurring.
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