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Old 08-04-2012, 09:58 PM
 
Location: somewhere
181 posts, read 446,169 times
Reputation: 190

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Would be interested to hear from people on this: move first, or get a job first? Ideally, get a job first, of course...but how to stand out as the out of state candidate? I sometimes feel a sense of despair as if my resume is going directly into the round file once they see my address is on the other side of the country. What to do? Unfortunately, I have no contacts in the state where I intend to move. What have other people done? Has anyone lied? Created a local address and phone number, then dealt with issues later (such as "You sound great! How about interviewing tomorrow?"--Panic/lying ensues.)

I am great at what I do, but unfortunately it's not an in-demand field, we are a dime a dozen. I have colleagues who have managed to get the hiring company to relocate them, all expenses paid, which boggles my mind. Especially in this economy. But my colleagues were more on the business end than I am. (I'm a designer).

I've done the Move first--get job later thing. It was rough. I never did get a permanent job in the new city (I temped) and eventually had to move home due to financial hardship. Don't want to go through that again. But I am very determined to make this work. I am absolutely miserable in my current city. And it's not a case of "wherever you go, there you are." The culture just doesn't fit me. I was a lot happier (job struggles aside) in a different city the last time I moved. So I'm trying it again, but this time I hope to never have to move back here.

I'm in L.A., planning to move to Boston. I figure both are expensive cities, so it's not like I'll be in for a shock with the cost of living. Plus I am single and childless, which makes things easier.

Anyway...if anyone has any brilliant long distance job-seeking strategies, I am all ears.
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Old 08-05-2012, 10:57 AM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
16,783 posts, read 25,845,337 times
Reputation: 12698
It IS going to be hard to get a job from afar. All things being equal, the company is always going to interview the local candidate(s) first. No one wants to wait around for someone when there is a pool of applicants ready, willing and able to start.

One thing you could do is rent a mailbox at an HQ or Regus place. It gives you a real, physical address to use on your resume and you can have mail sent there too. When we moved my DH used such a set up - he works from home but prefers not to have business mail sent to the house, for several reasons.

As far as getting to interviews...you need to come up with a plan for that. You can't say "I'll have to see when I can get a low cost flight, which will probably be 30 days from now". I don't really have a solution to this problem for you. Hopefully you would be able to line up a number of interviews over the course of a week and get that out of the way all at once. On the other hand, there's any number of reasons why you might not be available on a moment's notice....no potential employer is going to hold it against you if you say something like "I can't interview tomorrow as we have a training seminar/client presentation/whatever can't be missed tomorrow/in 2 days/whatever". It shows you are a dedicated employee.

When my sister was moving out of state she attended job fairs and had interviews but nothing panned out till she moved. Once she moved she had a job within 3 weeks.

Good luck!
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Old 08-05-2012, 11:06 AM
 
469 posts, read 763,215 times
Reputation: 480
Ive seen it work both ways. Good friend of mine moved to Utah, didnt know anyone and didnt have a job. Complete success for him, he now has a great job and beautiful home.

Im considering a move myself. Ive interviewed for several out of state jobs. All of them are located in states ive never been to. I rely on City Data to give me the skinny on the various areas.
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Old 08-05-2012, 12:12 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,487 posts, read 62,101,894 times
Reputation: 32153
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncalifornian girl View Post
Would be interested to hear from people on this: move first, or get a job first?
I've done the Move first--get job later thing. It was rough.
Even ten years ago -before the bottom fell out of everything- that was rough.
Today? Rough is where it starts. It's BRUTAL.

Quote:
Ideally, get a job first, of course... but how to stand out as the out of state candidate?
I am great at what I do, but unfortunately it's not an in-demand field, we are a dime a dozen.
(I'm a designer).
This is the core of the problem and EVERY resolution will be individualized.
What will/might/could work for X is not a reason to assume it will/might/could work for Y.
There are no pat answers.

Quote:
I'm in L.A., planning to move to Boston.
Do you have a business or work related reason of any sort for choosing Boston?
Family or an old lover willing to put you up for free until you find something?

Because (as has been said before)... moving to X should only come after having developed a solid business or work related reason to choose X. But when X is about as far as one could go and still
remain in the same country... it seems desperate.
The wardrobe and automobile expenses alone w/should be reason to stay in at least So Cal.

Surely there is something you can do to hold it together and still remain somewhere between
San Diego and Santa Barbara... even if it isn't "design"... so you can hold it all together
and avoid disrupting nearly every other aspect of your life while still looking.

Quote:
...if anyone has any brilliant long distance job-seeking strategies...
There's nothing brilliant about research, detective work, shoe leather... and time invested.
And no substitute for them either.

Read the out of town newspapers. Read the various C-D city forums. Find a user to ask Q's of.
Take short (2-3 day) trips to a few places if/when you have something more specific to do there
(like meet and interview etc) and then use that time in that city to investigate the other not so
specific opportunities you also came across.

It still comes down to eye contact and body language when in person and of course having
a good portfolio to show them. All you have to do is find who that "them" is for you.
Good luck.
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Old 08-05-2012, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
1,144 posts, read 1,823,620 times
Reputation: 1339
What I did when applying to an out of state job was to put a statement that I was moving to the area and would be there during so and so period of time to look for housing. Then I would also state I would like the opporuntity to interview for their open position at that time. I put this information in the first paragraph of the cover letter which is not the usual order but I found it did work out for me. I usually gave a date 3 to 4 weeks into the future to allow me to make plans for transporatation and hotels, as well as give the employer time to review resumes. Good luck.
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Old 08-05-2012, 01:17 PM
 
Location: somewhere
181 posts, read 446,169 times
Reputation: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Even ten years ago -before the bottom fell out of everything- that was rough.
Today? Rough is where it starts. It's BRUTAL.

This is the core of the problem and EVERY resolution will be individualized.
What will/might/could work for X is not a reason to assume it will/might/could work for Y.
There are no pat answers.


Do you have a business or work related reason of any sort for choosing Boston?
Family or an old lover willing to put you up for free until you find something?

Because (as has been said before)... moving to X should only come after having developed a solid business or work related reason to choose X. But when X is about as far as one could go and still
remain in the same country... it seems desperate.
The wardrobe and automobile expenses alone w/should be reason to stay in at least So Cal.

Surely there is something you can do to hold it together and still remain somewhere between
San Diego and Santa Barbara... even if it isn't "design"... so you can hold it all together
and avoid disrupting nearly every other aspect of your life while still looking.


There's nothing brilliant about research, detective work, shoe leather... and time invested.
And no substitute for them either.

Read the out of town newspapers. Read the various C-D city forums. Find a user to ask Q's of.
Take short (2-3 day) trips to a few places if/when you have something more specific to do there
(like meet and interview etc) and then use that time in that city to investigate the other not so
specific opportunities you also came across.

It still comes down to eye contact and body language when in person and of course having
a good portfolio to show them. All you have to do is find who that "them" is for you.
Good luck.

When I did it before, I moved from LA to Chicago, almost as far...well not really, but it was an extreme move. I survived, just not great. I regret not sticking it out, actually. It was in 2008-09 right when things got really bad, which scared me. I thought it was me! Now I know it was just happening everywhere. I think I would definitely still have a tough time of it, however from what I read Boston seems to be fairing better economically than the midwest. I do research every day, yes, and not just on CD.

One plus is I still have my Chicago winter gear! I also intend to get rid of my car.

No, there is no "rational" reason for the move. No work related reason, and no Boston family or love interest. It's purely a cultural thing. L.A. is probably the worst possible place for me to have a chance at happiness. (I won't get into all the details.) I've considered other parts of California, but they just don't offer enough of a change.

Of course, I won't attempt this without a significant savings. Hopefully I'll get some interview interest prior to moving. But even if I don't, I feel I have to do this. I give myself another year here, max. Or I really will go crazy!

There are specific companies I am interested in. I am tempted to cold contact people working there on LinkedIn, but I'm afraid of coming off as a weirdo.
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Old 08-05-2012, 01:19 PM
 
Location: somewhere
181 posts, read 446,169 times
Reputation: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJ1252 View Post
What I did when applying to an out of state job was to put a statement that I was moving to the area and would be there during so and so period of time to look for housing. Then I would also state I would like the opporuntity to interview for their open position at that time. I put this information in the first paragraph of the cover letter which is not the usual order but I found it did work out for me. I usually gave a date 3 to 4 weeks into the future to allow me to make plans for transporatation and hotels, as well as give the employer time to review resumes. Good luck.
This seems like a good plan.
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Old 08-05-2012, 01:28 PM
 
Location: somewhere
181 posts, read 446,169 times
Reputation: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
But when X is about as far as one could go and still
remain in the same country... it seems desperate.

And yes, I am quite desperate! But of course I am going to lie and say I have tons of friends and family/and or a fiance in the area. No one needs to know how crazy I really am
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Old 08-05-2012, 01:58 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,487 posts, read 62,101,894 times
Reputation: 32153
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncalifornian girl View Post
And yes, I am quite desperate! No one needs to know how crazy I really am
Before the weather changes... plan for a couple of 3 day trips to Boston (in September).
Compile a list of the companies and people most appropriate for your talent.
Whether they're advertising or not... prepare to meet these 4 or 5 people.

Lesson: Advertising for help is an admission of failure on the part of the company.
It is saying to the world that they were unable to train and promote from within.
The only legitimate reason to advertise is EEOC rules for larger companies...
everyone else should have people in the pipeline ready and able to move up.

Things still happen. Someone gets sick or a family issue comes up... whatever.
Most companies will still try to get by with who they have on staff or someone known to staff.
But still not advertise... publicly.

Then one day some chick from Cali drops in out of the sky ready to hit the ground running
and jump right into the rotation and help them get back on course.

Find one of these. Be sure you pack that parachute well.
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Old 08-05-2012, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Bay Area
1,520 posts, read 2,259,126 times
Reputation: 794
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJ1252 View Post
What I did when applying to an out of state job was to put a statement that I was moving to the area and would be there during so and so period of time to look for housing. Then I would also state I would like the opporuntity to interview for their open position at that time. I put this information in the first paragraph of the cover letter which is not the usual order but I found it did work out for me. I usually gave a date 3 to 4 weeks into the future to allow me to make plans for transporatation and hotels, as well as give the employer time to review resumes. Good luck.
i agree. i think part of it depends on how determined you are to make it work. i had a company move me from california to arizona and then dump me nine months later. i hated arizona and couldn't find a decent paying job like the one i had. ended up going back to work for the same company in california, only because i could call them on the phone and get hired. then i was moving from san jose to the inland empire. was planning on moving anyway. just happened to land a great job there before i'd even packed, thanks to a great employment agency (the job was posted on the web.)

this sounds lame, but i thing the energy and momentum sometimes brings in good luck. this economy is a whole different animal though.
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