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Old 10-02-2013, 12:44 PM
 
10 posts, read 10,588 times
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Hi all. Apologies if this runs long, I'm a writer, and I think to understand my situation, there are alot of factors to keep in mind. Your time and input are very much appreciated.

I'm a 33 year old guy on Long Island (Fun fact: we never say "in" Long Island. Always "on"). Since college (two bachelors degrees), I've had a bunch of different office jobs. My best and longest tenured one was a middle management position that demanded a mix of web development skills and marketing. It was stable, and it paid well for Long Island Web jobs (which are almost non existent), but there was no upward mobility and towards the end, I was simply wearing too many hats and not getting rewarded for it, so I left. Around this time, another very promising opportunity fell through, my car had major repairs, my phone died, my computer died, me and my girl split up, and my roommates (who I'd been best friends with since high school) went psycho over how often my girlfriend came over. I don't know if you've played The Game of Life board game, but this was totally that Day of Reckoning space.

Anyway, that took the wind out of my sails in alot of ways, and I haven't fully recovered. I moved back in with my parents after 7 years of independence. I've had a few temp office jobs since then, but nothing I can really build into a career. One particularly crappy job made me realize without the possibility of advancement or developing a specialized skillset, that I have very low tolerance for workplace BS. However, because I haven't been working in months, I had time to enter and win a contest that flew me out to Chicago - all expenses paid. It was Awesome.

In Chicago, I networked my butt off, and learned alot about what it would be like to live there. Cost of living is much better. The IT scene for entry level web guys is about the same as NYC. I met plenty of people my age and younger, supporting themselves with comparable qualifications as mine. On the way back, I couldn't fight off the feeling that Chicago could be exactly the change of scenery I need.

Long Island has never agreed with me. It's almost as expensive as NYC (which I like to visit as I'm a city guy, but NYC is just too loud and too fast, I'm always on edge there), and there aren't alot of jobs - even before the recession. Everyone I went to high school with is either married and barely scraping by, living at home, or had to move out of state to make ends meet. Young people have been moving out in droves for years. Also there are alot of really uptight snoody people and Jersey Shore wannabees. Everyone was so friendly in Chicago. Surprisingly, even the girls seemed prettier. It just felt right.

So, to sum up...

No job, hate my community, only qualified for admin assistant type jobs.
Got a degree, but its very general. Need to hit the books to improve my resume and portfolio if I ever wanna make north of $45K. Fortunately, I have time.
Saved my money, but probably not enough to move. $5K in the bank, maybe $20K in 401K, but to touch that is to give 10% back to the government in penalties.
The thought of uprooting and starting fresh is the only thing that gives me motivation, hope.

So the goal is Chicago by the fall of 2014. While I mentioned networking, I definitely don't want to depend on any acquaintances I met on vacation (other than info, and maybe professional networking).

Questions for you all.

1) Is there anything like a financial advisor who can give me a vague idea how much something like this may cost? Someone who has experience with big moves, finding new residences and jobs? And can assess my situation, and give me customized goals? That should be a thing.... but I haven't found anything.

2) So far, the majority of articles say procure the job first, then the apartment. Do you agree? Even if you aren't qualified enough to be considered for any job that responds to phone interviews?

3) Assuming I'm only taking the essentials (I'm a pack rat, but most of it is sentimental and can stay with the parents a bit longer - I would say I'll be taking less than the average bachelor), would anyone hazard an estimate as to what my target $$$ amount should be before trying this? Finding the balance between when to focus on studying and when to get a job is tricky for me.

Thanks so much.
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Old 10-02-2013, 01:33 PM
Status: "On The Lookout" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,389 posts, read 61,750,545 times
Reputation: 31932
Quote:
Originally Posted by LatinGrooveNinja View Post
I'm a 33 year old guy on Long Island
(two bachelors degrees),
I've had a bunch of different office jobs.

Long Island has never agreed with me.

• No job, hate my community, only qualified for admin assistant type jobs.
• Got a degree, but its very general.
• Saved my money, but probably not enough to move. $5K in the bank
• The thought of uprooting and starting fresh is the only thing that gives me motivation, hope.
Compare yourself to the 100,000 others like you who have commitments and obligations.
Then sell the big stuff, pack the little stuff... and go somewhere that appeals.
Get out of your head.

Then it's job first; apartment only after you know the work address.
Live close enough to walk/bicycle.
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Old 10-02-2013, 02:02 PM
 
35,325 posts, read 24,979,656 times
Reputation: 32369
You can move from NY to Chicago for almost nothing. You don't need a car there. Have money stuck away for first/last/security, which won't be bad as you'll have roommates. Try to get a sublet on craiglist. Between public transit and a bike, you can get around. A few thousand, 3-4 (more the better), and I think you could do it. Get right to a temp agency, do the testing, and get something where some bucks will start coming in as you look for a permanent job.

Yeah, of course having a job first helps, but with a basic skillset and looking for basically entry level work, the chances are that won't happen.

BTW, it was awhile ago, but I did a Boston to Wisconsin move in my mid 20s after being in a Boston rut and it was the best decision I've ever made.
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Old 10-02-2013, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Lansing, MI
2,954 posts, read 6,120,716 times
Reputation: 3253
Job first, especially if you're moving to a large metro. Nothing worse than 1. ending up in terrible neighborhood because you don't know the area, or 2. having an apt REALLY FAR AWAY from the job you accept once the offer comes in.

Craigslist is a beautiful thing... find a room for rent until you get your job lined up.
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Old 10-02-2013, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,565 posts, read 14,180,052 times
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I don't think it is possible to line up the sort of work you are qualified for before you move. If you were a research scientist or a highly qualified nurse, then perhaps yes. But in your case, you will have to move first and then pound the pavement looking for work.

I think without local references you will need to shine at some local temp work before landing a permanent job. But if you want to move to Chicago, then you should do it now. It would be best to have some more money saved though.
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Old 10-03-2013, 09:12 AM
Status: "On The Lookout" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,389 posts, read 61,750,545 times
Reputation: 31932
Whats needed for moving on without a job

Details vary but the common themes include at least 3 of these four:
1) having some genuine skill that is actually needed where they are going
2) a willingness to do *whatever* they can find until something better comes along
3) having enough CASH on hand to pay ALL of their bills for six months
4) not having any dependents to provide for

You have most of these attributes...

Expecting to find "The Job" (let alone to have it offered) in advance of moving is almost silly.
Be willing to take whatever you can get to pay the bills and to keep those bills low while looking.
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Old 10-03-2013, 11:13 AM
 
10 posts, read 10,588 times
Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragon_fly_12 View Post
Job first, especially if you're moving to a large metro. Nothing worse than 1. ending up in terrible neighborhood because you don't know the area, or 2. having an apt REALLY FAR AWAY from the job you accept once the offer comes in.

Craigslist is a beautiful thing... find a room for rent until you get your job lined up.
I may just be having a brain fail, but I don't see how your first and last sentences don't contradict. If you could clarify which you think should be first, I'd be grateful. And yeah, I totally agree. First option would be looking on craigslist to sublet. I've spoken to a few chicagoans about what neighborhoods to target, and which to avoid.


Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
You can move from NY to Chicago for almost nothing. You don't need a car there. Have money stuck away for first/last/security, which won't be bad as you'll have roommates. Try to get a sublet on craiglist. Between public transit and a bike, you can get around. A few thousand, 3-4 (more the better), and I think you could do it. Get right to a temp agency, do the testing, and get something where some bucks will start coming in as you look for a permanent job.

Yeah, of course having a job first helps, but with a basic skillset and looking for basically entry level work, the chances are that won't happen.

BTW, it was awhile ago, but I did a Boston to Wisconsin move in my mid 20s after being in a Boston rut and it was the best decision I've ever made.
Cool. Thanks, I really appreciate it. If it's not too much trouble, could you tell me a little more about what it was like, and what your job situation was like when you made the leap? I found your story and advice very encouraging.


Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I don't think it is possible to line up the sort of work you are qualified for before you move. If you were a research scientist or a highly qualified nurse, then perhaps yes. But in your case, you will have to move first and then pound the pavement looking for work.

I think without local references you will need to shine at some local temp work before landing a permanent job. But if you want to move to Chicago, then you should do it now. It would be best to have some more money saved though.
Thanks. I'm curious... is there something in particular that makes you say I should move sooner rather than later? My (admittedly rough draft of a) plan is to spend the time I have between now and when the summer returns (don't wanna worry about driving a big cumbersome truck carrying all my belongings on wintery roads in the midwest.... if that turns out to be the cheapest moving option) is to improve my portfolio (resume is actually decent for entry level IT) and learn and implement newer web design practices so I'm a better job candidate. Also, so I can get a job here, and earn more money for the move.

Not trying to be contrary, just curious as to your point of view.
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Old 10-03-2013, 12:02 PM
Status: "On The Lookout" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,389 posts, read 61,750,545 times
Reputation: 31932
Quote:
Originally Posted by LatinGrooveNinja View Post
I may just be having a brain fail, but I don't see how your first and last sentences don't contradict.
...is there something in particular that makes you say I should move sooner rather than later?
Either you *want* to go or you don't.
Many, perhaps even most, who ask these questions don't really want to move...
or at the least want that move to be some sort of smooth transition fantasy experience.

If you do want to go then there is little gained (for most) in delaying the move.
The issue is what you can reasonably expect to have/find when you arrive.

Don't expect an invitation to your dream job anytime soon and you'll be fine.
Expect to do something else to get by on until the opening happens...
while the application process to wend it's way through the hurdles and you'll be fine.

Until then... rent an inexpensive studio or share a bigger place.
Conserve the cash you have... live on what you can earn in the scutty get by job until then.

If/when the dream job materializes... then you can get back to the transition fantasy.
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Old 10-04-2013, 07:56 PM
 
2,478 posts, read 4,850,192 times
Reputation: 4483
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragon_fly_12 View Post
Job first, especially if you're moving to a large metro. Nothing worse than 1. ending up in terrible neighborhood because you don't know the area, or 2. having an apt REALLY FAR AWAY from the job you accept once the offer comes in.

Craigslist is a beautiful thing... find a room for rent until you get your job lined up.
^what dragon fly says. JOB FIRST. Not only do you risk ending up in a neighborhood too far away, but having your own apartment is going to siphon a lot of money from you all while you have no income. Finding a room to rent on craigslist or similar is a much cheaper option.
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Old 10-05-2013, 07:55 AM
 
5,002 posts, read 4,225,816 times
Reputation: 3009
Ok I am the minority here.

Last year we packed up and moved from Long Island to Pittsburgh with no jobs. Have some money socked away first ; thats the important thing. Luckily we were able to visit a few times and find a house that we could afford.

Over a year later, kids are settled here, I got a job through an agency and was made permament after 3 months. My dh went back to school full time.

I say go for it ; I know how hard Long Island is and how expensive it is. We set ourselves a leave by date and made it.

Good luck. Its a huge world out there and it is si free to be off long island.
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