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Old 12-14-2013, 01:16 PM
 
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I think weather is an excellent reason to move. If I ever move, it will be the main reason I move.

 
Old 12-14-2013, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
Let's all check in with Elle, enjoying the Phoenix weather, in August!

Seriously, Elle, I hope you love it! Wear a lot so sunscreen, and I suggest getting some SPF clothing, you can deduct it from your flexible spending account.
Coolibar: Sun Protective Clothing - Coolibar
Also always keep something to rehydrate you with you. If you feel spacy or faint at all, keep hydrating. Learn all the signs of dehydration. August in Phoenix is monsoon time too and travel very carefully. And you get humditity with the heat. Not saying you won't adjust, just be aware of the potential and take care of yourself.

I got a call from a friend who lived there once in August. He'd gone to the store. In between his trip inside and walking out, the heavens had opened up and the street turned into a rushing river. He was watching people get out of their cars and one idiot was trying to drive INTO the water. Ask the locals about monsoon season and how to watch out for yourself.
 
Old 12-14-2013, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctic_gardener View Post
Well, so would I, because 20 degrees Fahrenheit is not cold

Now if we were comparing 110 to 40 below zero, what would you pick? At this point, it's not just about human comfort. Things you take for granted stop working. Cars don't start, plastics shatter like glass, oil freezes up, and so on.
True. Recently we had a couple weeks of temps maxing out in the low twenties. At night they hit single digits. In Minnesota you'd laugh, but here houses aren't built to keep out the cold like that. Your house would be warmer if you had extreme cold every year. Just as a lot of people have non-powered heaters here, since ice and power outtages are common. Each area adjusts.

When I visited Kansas I actually loved it, but then looked into the storms and decided a little further south with somewhat less fierce storms would be preferable. And had inlaws who lived in Minnesota and heard ALL the stories about permenant until sometime in spring snowbanks and now way, ever....

We may have another white christmas this year. I'm stocking up so I won't need to trudge out into it. Luckily a neighbor has a truck with four wheel drive.
 
Old 12-14-2013, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
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Very heavy blinding and blowing snow now, and temperatures dip down to 21 F outside. Mom and dad went out, but never returned. They were supposed to be back by 2, and its now 3:56 PM. I am very worried with what happened to them . Hope they make it back safely. We are moving in the first week of January and want to customize our new house before moving in (New carpets, countertops, thermostat, more powerful A/C, and dehumidifying fans) and are shopping for these items before starting the move in project.
 
Old 12-14-2013, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adi from the Brunswicks View Post
Well, Phoenix is hotter than New Delhi in summer, and that place was pure hell in my opinion. Phoenix heat gives me the creeps. I fainted due to heat stroke in New Delhi when I visited and had to be placed in the cool room for 10 hours with proper temperature and humidity levels with sufficient amount of fluids administered to recover. Be VERY careful with desert heat. You DON'T want to experience becoming a victim of acute heat stroke. All I remember was fainting due to exhaustion on the street and ending up in an A/C hospital room. I dont know how long it took to get there or how I ended up there. Very scary experience
I do fine up to about 90. Even with humidity and plenty of water, its tolerable. Past that I have to be very very careful. The summers in socal were one reason to move. A hundred plus from sometime in spring to October meant I didn't go out a lot. I know all the symptoms of dehydration and yet had a copule of trips to the ER for fluids, and got sick from the imbalance from early dehydration a lot.

Desert heat is tricky too, since the humidity is so low. Its a hundren and ten and normal humidity and you know how hot it is, and you feel it and you *take precautions* since you feel the need. 110 in the desert with say four percent humidity doesn't really feel that hot, since you still sweat but it doesn't sit on your skin. You don't know your getting dehydrated until you start to feel awful. Its also bad to transition between a nice seventy in a building with AC directly into 115 degrees. I have friends who live in Phoenix, and in the summer they stay inside most of the time. He works at night. These are people who grew up there and they respect the heat and the way it can trick you into not takeing proper care.

My dad moved to Vegas and ended up with heatstroke, and he loved the heat, just didn't read his body's warnings since it was so dry.

I'd say, for anyone with fluid balance problems the desert is not a good place to be.
 
Old 12-14-2013, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
11,882 posts, read 11,121,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
I do fine up to about 90. Even with humidity and plenty of water, its tolerable. Past that I have to be very very careful. The summers in socal were one reason to move. A hundred plus from sometime in spring to October meant I didn't go out a lot. I know all the symptoms of dehydration and yet had a copule of trips to the ER for fluids, and got sick from the imbalance from early dehydration a lot.

Desert heat is tricky too, since the humidity is so low. Its a hundren and ten and normal humidity and you know how hot it is, and you feel it and you *take precautions* since you feel the need. 110 in the desert with say four percent humidity doesn't really feel that hot, since you still sweat but it doesn't sit on your skin. You don't know your getting dehydrated until you start to feel awful. Its also bad to transition between a nice seventy in a building with AC directly into 115 degrees. I have friends who live in Phoenix, and in the summer they stay inside most of the time. He works at night. These are people who grew up there and they respect the heat and the way it can trick you into not takeing proper care.

My dad moved to Vegas and ended up with heatstroke, and he loved the heat, just didn't read his body's warnings since it was so dry.

I'd say, for anyone with fluid balance problems the desert is not a good place to be.
More temperature moderated seasons with warm summers and moderate humidity like those in Western NC and Eastern TN suit me well. Winters there are quite pleasant and not as long lasting as up here.

The thing about cold up north is not the intensity, but the duration. Unlike OK, where you do get single digits but it leaves quickly, frigid air in NJ stalls and refuses to budge for weeks on end.

Similarly, summers in OK are longer in duration. Even though it is hot and humid up here, we do get cool & dry breaks with lows in the 50's (this year we even got upper 40's in August ). Unlike NJ, I believe that in the south the summer heat dome refuses to budge thereby making the heat prolonged and constant.
 
Old 12-14-2013, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,489,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adi from the Brunswicks View Post
More temperature moderated seasons with warm summers and moderate humidity like those in Western NC and Eastern TN suit me well. Winters there are quite pleasant and not as long lasting as up here.

The thing about cold up north is not the intensity, but the duration. Unlike OK, where you do get single digits but it leaves quickly, frigid air in NJ stalls and refuses to budge for weeks on end.

Similarly, summers in OK are longer in duration. Even though it is hot and humid up here, we do get cool & dry breaks with lows in the 50's (this year we even got upper 40's in August ). Unlike NJ, I believe that in the south the summer heat dome refuses to budge thereby making the heat prolonged and constant.
The year before last we had temps of 110 and up for two months running, with humidity. It was awful but having lived where that was the norm helped a bit. The humidity in the Inland Empire areas of California (Riverside and San Bernadino counties) had risen dramatically with all the building and watering of grass on desert) But that summer wasn't normal for us, and it topped off more in the high 90's the last one.

The really interesting thing about weather here is its between two climatic zones. We get the weather of whoever is over us. We get days where its in the seventies followed very suddenly (within hours) by highs in the low fourties and lows in the thirties. I keep as supply of multi weather clothes easily available. Its true what they say that if you don't like the weather, wait awhile, it will change.
 
Old 12-14-2013, 03:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElleTea View Post
It is true that Des Moines does seem sunnier in the winter than other places in the midwest. But Phoenix is sunnier than that! Just took the dogs for a nice walk. Short sleeves and capri pants.
As an added bonus your chihuahuas are now right next door to the land their ancestors hail from
 
Old 12-14-2013, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee, WI
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Lots of good points about the Phoenix heat made here. When you take into account all the other problems in the area, like valley fever, smog, and Phoenix being a major hub for the Mexican drug cartels, it makes you wonder why on earth anyone would want to live there.
 
Old 12-14-2013, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALR4929 View Post
Phoenix being a major hub for the Mexican drug cartels
Dude, drugs are everywhere if you go searching for them. JUST DON'T DO IT.
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