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Old 05-01-2014, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,135 posts, read 14,029,586 times
Reputation: 7050

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoEagle View Post
People ask you if you've been there before they interview you? I've never been asked that. They just have said can you come for an interview and I come to the interview.
Yes, I have been asked that by every single recruiter or employer that contacted me from a distant city. It happened to me with jobs I applied to in Florida, Denver, Dallas and Las Vegas. Every single place.
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Old 05-01-2014, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,689 posts, read 23,526,029 times
Reputation: 35375
It depends on how you visit. I would never relocate to a place without first visiting there but having said that I would not visit as a tourist but rather as someone who was planning to live in a prospective new place. That's what I have done. I think too often people will vacation in a place and fall in love with it thinking that's where they want to spend their lives only to discover after relocation to their dream spot that living and vacationing in a place can be two entirely different things.

So going to a potential new area should be a reconnaissance mission to discover important things like what type of housing, COL, available jobs, etc are available and not how pretty the scenery is or how many bars and restaurants there may be there.
Of course, both can be done if enough time is spent.

Many cities have undeserved reputations that can be either true or untrue; good or bad. That's why I think it's always good to check things out for yourself otherwise you might be pleasantly surprised or very disappointed.
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Old 05-02-2014, 06:42 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,644 posts, read 8,917,608 times
Reputation: 10892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
It depends on how you visit. I would never relocate to a place without first visiting there but having said that I would not visit as a tourist but rather as someone who was planning to live in a prospective new place. That's what I have done. I think too often people will vacation in a place and fall in love with it thinking that's where they want to spend their lives only to discover after relocation to their dream spot that living and vacationing in a place can be two entirely different things.

So going to a potential new area should be a reconnaissance mission to discover important things like what type of housing, COL, available jobs, etc are available and not how pretty the scenery is or how many bars and restaurants there may be there.
Of course, both can be done if enough time is spent.

Many cities have undeserved reputations that can be either true or untrue; good or bad. That's why I think it's always good to check things out for yourself otherwise you might be pleasantly surprised or very disappointed.
Good advice. This is how people move to Montana all the time. They like the pretty mountains and then realize once they get there those mountains don't pay the bills.
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Old 05-02-2014, 06:45 AM
 
2,682 posts, read 4,368,925 times
Reputation: 1925
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Do you think it's a good idea to pursue employment and plan to relocate somewhere that sounds good on paper, but you've never visited even once?

A couple years ago, I did tons of research and concluded that I wanted to move to Denver. However, when I visited Denver afterward, the general area did not appeal to me at all. I was a bit shocked at how hippie/liberal it was, and my research didn't quite paint an accurate picture enough as to how the place was in real life. I mean, I KNEW that it was a liberal environment, but just the way people carried themselves, their appearances/styles, flannel shirts, guys with long hair, goth girls, snow hats, etc. just weren't quite captured in my research. I just couldn't see myself fitting in there culturally. I spent hours looking at various spots in the area on Google Maps street view, but in real life it just appeared and felt different than I had imagined. So I decided not to move there.

But now my research is telling me that a few places in the country might be good for me, but I've never been to them. So I don't know what to do.

What would be your best advice on this matter?
Research is good, but take a quick Thursday to Sunday flight out to the destination and look around.

It seems like you are looking for something semi specific, so you have to travel. If you just want generic suburb with strip malls, then pretty much anywhere fits that criteria.

Btw, I have never been to Denver before, but thought there were areas that were much more conservative.
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Old 05-02-2014, 08:36 AM
 
8,995 posts, read 9,418,006 times
Reputation: 7819
Quote:
Originally Posted by signalfire View Post
Google Maps are typically photographed on Sundays when the cars can get around easier with less traffic, especially for cities. Keep that in mind if you see some city-scape and wonder where all the people are, or figure from that that your commute will be a piece of cake. And Google maps also has a 'traffic' feature that will let you tell it what time you'll be driving through an area and it will tell you the typical crunch/crash points and how long the drive will really take you. I've found them to be correct to the minute most of the time.
I used Google maps before I moved to "drive around" my new neighborhood. I did it so much, it seemed familiar when I arrived.
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Old 05-02-2014, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Beautiful hills
248 posts, read 399,369 times
Reputation: 506
I've moved several times in the past to cities/states I've never been to before.
Like many already said here, I treat it as an adventure.
I also believe that one cannot get a real feel for a place unless one lived there.
Visiting is just not enough and is definitely not the same as actually living somewhere.

Luckily, in my line of work, I can move to any of 50 states as long as there is a job opening in my company's office. So whenever I have gotten that antsy feeling in the past, and was ready to change scenery, I would just look for a job opening in a state I was interested in and move.

I strongly believe that it takes a mature and independent individual to make such moves, as I've seen horrified faces of my new co-workers when I told them I've never been to their city before and did not know anyone when I moved.

For some, just a thought of living their comfort zone seemed terrifying.

P.S. I have to add that I did a thorough research prior to move EVERY time, and city-data site & forum were always very helpful
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Old 05-02-2014, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Arkansas
118 posts, read 350,578 times
Reputation: 129
Nobody on this forum can make that decision for you, or give the right advice for you. You have to evaluate your own situation and make your own choice, keeping in mind the valuable advice previously given here of having an exit plan after a year of renting if you decide you don't like it there.

No, it's not the best idea - bottom line.

We're going through the same thing right now, moving a thousand miles away to a place we've never been. We're doing all our research, asking questions of local people on this site, and considering everything carefully. We do not have the time or money to go for even a weekend, so we're going to "man up" and just go out there. One has a job, one will get a job when we arrive. We have found a rental situation with a 3-month lease and option to renew after that. That's the worst difficulty we've found - finding a **decent** place to live that fits our needs - and doing this all from out of state and over the phone. Many places that sound perfect on line are not in a good area of town for us.

Brutal honesty:
You have to decide if you're willing to take the chance to move somewhere sight unseen...

making your decision after lots of research and considering everything carefully.

That's all there is to it. End of discussion.
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Old 05-02-2014, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,689 posts, read 23,526,029 times
Reputation: 35375
A few more suggestions is if possible, leave yourself an escape route. Planes, trains and highways lead in both directions and all sorts of destinations beyond. If one place does not work out, there are others. You can go back or try something else. It isn't easy especially financially and if a family is involved but people have done it. Sometimes it takes living in a few places to find a final home.

And places change along with one's needs. In my own situation, thirty five years ago when I relocated from Chicago to Portland, OR it was exactly the right move for me. But today Portland is no longer suits my needs. So I am relocating to Cleveland, OH next month. I have done my research and I believe this will work so much better for me now.
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Old 05-02-2014, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
5,590 posts, read 3,585,239 times
Reputation: 16379
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I know, but just because I have the ability to move and am unencumbered doesn't necessarily mean that a move would be good for me. I keep finding serious problems about every place other than Hartford County, CT.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I would much rather be back in greater Hartford than here. However, at the same time, I am not excited about the idea of going back there, because I've lived there almost my entire life and at the age of 29 I'm just "over" it.
From these two posts, I would conclude that the best place for you to live is in Hartford County, CT. It doesn't sound like you're "over" it, just that you're getting a little bit of the "grass is always greener on the other side of the fence" syndrome. We've all had it at one time or another. Regardless, there is no shame in being satisfied with the place you've lived your whole life.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
In my opinion, weather is not a professional reason for wanting to relocate somewhere and would probably be frowned upon to prospective employers. My reasons would be: pursuit of a lifestyle change, better economics and housing, and steer the direction of my career.
Employers are mainly interested in how you can help them become more profitable. Obviously, they want their employees to be happy where they're located, or else they might up and move away. But their main focus is on their bottom line, not yours. If you can convey to potential employers ways in which you will help them meet their needs, they'll overlook your desires for better weather or lifestyle or whatever.
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Old 05-02-2014, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Spring Hill Florida
12,135 posts, read 13,179,541 times
Reputation: 6006
Without visiting a place, staying a few days eating where the locals eat, going to a bar where the locals go, not smelling the air or drinking the water and many other research steps I think it would bne insane to relocate somewhere.

If you can keep your "home base", pack a suitcase and start traveling, that would be a good way to find your next area of residence.





Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Do you think it's a good idea to pursue employment and plan to relocate somewhere that sounds good on paper, but you've never visited even once?

A couple years ago, I did tons of research and concluded that I wanted to move to Denver. However, when I visited Denver afterward, the general area did not appeal to me at all. I was a bit shocked at how hippie/liberal it was, and my research didn't quite paint an accurate picture enough as to how the place was in real life. I mean, I KNEW that it was a liberal environment, but just the way people carried themselves, their appearances/styles, flannel shirts, guys with long hair, goth girls, snow hats, etc. just weren't quite captured in my research. I just couldn't see myself fitting in there culturally. I spent hours looking at various spots in the area on Google Maps street view, but in real life it just appeared and felt different than I had imagined. So I decided not to move there.

But now my research is telling me that a few places in the country might be good for me, but I've never been to them. So I don't know what to do.

What would be your best advice on this matter?
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