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Old 08-03-2014, 11:52 AM
 
61 posts, read 53,293 times
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Hey there all, long time reader, first time poster.

Like my username says, my spouse and I are planning on moving from Burlington, VT to Denver, CO in a few months. We are currently researching trailers and Uhaul trucks. We are attempting to consolidate as many things as we can, so we are looking to get our items less than 9' by 15' (our last storage unit). I initially thought of a Uhaul truck and towing our Honda CRV behind it. We have two cats and would be unsure of where to place them in this scenario, Another option is to put a hitch on the CRV and tow a trailer. Neither of us have driven anything large so the truck isn't so appealing. Is a hitch and trailer more difficult to drive x country? Also, any advice or opinions on where to move would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 08-03-2014, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
5,045 posts, read 5,964,254 times
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Welcome to the forum!!

moving from Burlington, VT to Denver, CO in a few months.

As in when there is ice and snow? How are you at trailering cars in elevations with ice and snow? Personally, I'd rather be driving that CR-V with a set of new tires and the cats in hard shell carriers, strapped down in the rear seat with bungee cords, following a small Penske truck or cargo van (I hate U-Haul . . . read the criticisms for yourself and then decide). Do not overload the CR-V and tie everything down. Worse case scenario is a roll-over accident, which is why I'm advising hard-shell carriers, one for each cat.

If it were a summer move, I wouldn't be as concerned but it sounds like you'll be out here during black ice time and other fun road conditions.

I'm not sure your CR-V can tow much. Mine can't. But check your owner's manual.

Example of hard shell cat carrier:

http://www.target.com/p/petmate-pet-...FQgLaQodBn8AuA

Last edited by Meemur; 08-03-2014 at 12:35 PM..
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Old 08-04-2014, 06:06 PM
 
61 posts, read 53,293 times
Reputation: 111
Thanks for the reply. Has anyone had experience moving cats? We are a bit concerned for the temp of the car, food, water, ect. We want to move but want the cats to be in the best shape. We are considering corner litter boxes and hanging food and water, but at almost $100 for all the cage upgrades, we were wondering if there were easier ways to meet the cats' needs.

Definitely will tow the CRV then, can you make the towed car run A/C while its being towed by connection with the truck?
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Old 08-04-2014, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
5,045 posts, read 5,964,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burltodenver View Post
Definitely will tow the CRV then, can you make the towed car run A/C while its being towed by connection with the truck?
No, Drive the CR-V. Don't tow it. Bungee the cats into the back seat in hard shell cases ($14 -- see the link I posted at the bottom of my last post -- click on the title in blue -- it's a link). Rent either a small truck or cargo van for the rest of your stuff. Consider driving two vehicles because it will be winter. There will be snow and ice in Denver and maybe black ice on I-80 until about April or so.

The cats don't need litter in their carriers. You can stick a litter box in your bathtub at the motel when you stop for the day. Give them their main meal at night.
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Old 08-04-2014, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,390 posts, read 17,314,904 times
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There should be room on the seat of the truck for a cat carrier. Stop every few hours and let your cats out (on leashes) to do their thing. If they need a litter box, place it in the trunk of your car and get it out during stops. I'd start now to train your cats to ride. One or both of them might get car sick, and it would be better to know that now, and get them used to traveling on short trips than on a long one. You could start with simply a drive around the block, then extend it to longer trips until it's second nature to them.

I pretty certain your CRV wouldn't tow enough for your move. And you'll probably need a dolly to tow it with. Driving a truck with the car behind should be relatively easy as long as you don't try to back up. (DON'T try to back up with a toad!) Refuel at truck stops and plan ahead to stay at hotels/motels where there's room for truckers to park.

Edited to say I agree with Meemur that it would be best if you both drove one vehicle rather than towing, especially since you've never driven a truck, and if you get on slick roads, you DO NOT want to be towing. You could easily run into snow/ice after Oct. 1. If you do, I'd suggest that you park and wait it out. It won't last long until you get into late November.

Last edited by WyoNewk; 08-04-2014 at 07:13 PM..
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Old 08-05-2014, 07:54 AM
 
61 posts, read 53,293 times
Reputation: 111
We were going to do that, but thought of the double gas as a bit of a negative. Money is a concern moving. Although if its safer, I don't want to expose us to dangerous conditions. We are both good with winter driving from VT, if that makes a difference.
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Old 08-05-2014, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
5,045 posts, read 5,964,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burltodenver View Post
We are both good with winter driving from VT, if that makes a difference.
And you'll need every bit of it! You'll be dealing with ice, snow, high winds, and grades (elevations). Denver's nickname is "Mile High City."

Otherwise, I would plead with you to move between May and September. You're crossing *prairie.* There's very little to stop the wind, so when it snows or rains and freezes, conditions get dicey quickly. You're going to be climbing into mountains.

Why not work a little extra, sell a little more, and have enough money so that it's safety first? You may even have to take an extra day or two in a hotel. They shut down the freeways out here when conditions get too bad.

The frugal living subforum has a lot of ideas that you put into practice for a limited time so you save as much as you can for the move.
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Old 08-05-2014, 11:08 AM
 
Location: I live wherever I am.
1,935 posts, read 3,719,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burltodenver View Post
Hey there all, long time reader, first time poster.

Like my username says, my spouse and I are planning on moving from Burlington, VT to Denver, CO in a few months. We are currently researching trailers and Uhaul trucks. We are attempting to consolidate as many things as we can, so we are looking to get our items less than 9' by 15' (our last storage unit). I initially thought of a Uhaul truck and towing our Honda CRV behind it. We have two cats and would be unsure of where to place them in this scenario, Another option is to put a hitch on the CRV and tow a trailer. Neither of us have driven anything large so the truck isn't so appealing. Is a hitch and trailer more difficult to drive x country? Also, any advice or opinions on where to move would be greatly appreciated.
If you are trying to get stuff from a 9x15 (135 square foot) unit into a moving vehicle, you will have to go with a truck. That CR-V won't have much towing capacity, so you could only hope to tow a small trailer (maybe a 5x8 at best).

I had a 10x10 (100 square foot) storage unit and I needed two trips in a Tahoe to get everything out - the first time, I dragged a 6x12 trailer and the second time, I dragged a 5x8 trailer. The unit was very full and the trailers were very full when I dragged them. Since the 6x12 is the biggest trailer that U-Haul offers, even if you had a truck powerful enough to drag it, you'd only get about half of your stuff into the trailer. Thus, you should go with a truck. I say go with one that gives you 150 square feet or more of interior storage space, because the way you pack stuff for transport is not the way you'd pack it in a storage unit that won't move.
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Old 08-05-2014, 03:20 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,194 posts, read 8,321,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meemur View Post
And you'll need every bit of it! You'll be dealing with ice, snow, high winds, and grades (elevations). Denver's nickname is "Mile High City."

Otherwise, I would plead with you to move between May and September. You're crossing *prairie.* There's very little to stop the wind, so when it snows or rains and freezes, conditions get dicey quickly. You're going to be climbing into mountains.

Why not work a little extra, sell a little more, and have enough money so that it's safety first? You may even have to take an extra day or two in a hotel. They shut down the freeways out here when conditions get too bad.

The frugal living subforum has a lot of ideas that you put into practice for a limited time so you save as much as you can for the move.
If the OP's destination is the Denver metro area, yes, there can be weather issues at that time of year, BUT, there are no significant grades to climb.

Denver is on the western edge of the Great Plains. The elevation change from, say, Iowa, is not even noticeable. The "mountain" grades are all west of Denver.

Actually I-80 thru Iowa probably has more "rolling hill" grades than Nebraska or eastern Colorado. BTDT.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...stern_Iowa.jpg
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Old 08-05-2014, 03:56 PM
 
61 posts, read 53,293 times
Reputation: 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
If the OP's destination is the Denver metro area, yes, there can be weather issues at that time of year, BUT, there are no significant grades to climb.

Denver is on the western edge of the Great Plains. The elevation change from, say, Iowa, is not even noticeable. The "mountain" grades are all west of Denver.

Actually I-80 thru Iowa probably has more "rolling hill" grades than Nebraska or eastern Colorado. BTDT.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...stern_Iowa.jpg
Thank you. I have a feeling the driving will be rough but not impossible. We are planning around Oct. 1. Hopefully before any freak snow storms.


--
We are looking at craigslist and, compared to Burlington, Denver's housing market seems vast and complicated. What are some neighborhoods to be looking in? We are Environmental students that enjoy skiing, outdoors, ect. Capitol Hill and a few other places seem the best. Is the market in Denver more independent landlords, or large busniesses? Any general advice would be great about neighborhoods as well.
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