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Old 12-10-2014, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,547,969 times
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Plenty of great advice here. I've lived in four different houses in recent years but prior to that I lived in so many different apartments I've lost track of the number. In my experience, the most important factors in ensuring quiet are (in order):

1. Building construction (yes, old is better and concrete construction is best)
2. Pet situation (no pets allowed is best; in some cities that is more likely than others)
3. Age of residents (older is quieter)

Buildings constructed TO BE CONDOS are usually the quietest, but the term "condo" itself is no guarantee. Many condominiums are "condo conversions," i.e. buildings that used to be rentals but were later sold as condos. Newer rental buildings usually aren't constructed with any effort whatsoever to abate noise. Older buildings with high-quality construction, and building built for the purpose of being condominiums, will be quieter.

Even living with downright elderly people is no guarantee of quiet. Many turn their TVs up daily to screech-level with no regard for the fact that others aren't hard of hearing. But you have one party and these same people are calling the police. Plenty of old people sleep with their TVs on, so it never stops. Also, some elders are bored and lonely and they dedicate themselves to getting into their neighbors' business.

I'm sure children can be just as bad. But as someone mentioned, if you rent in a building that has one-bedrooms or studios, you are less likely to get children in the building. (Needless to say, stay away from anyplace with a playground!)

As I said, I live in a single-family home now and I've found all of them to be just as noisy as apartments. Mostly it's the dogs. My HOA has a rule against more than three dogs and people disobey it all the time. Many of my neighbors leave their dogs outside all day while they are at work and it's constant barking. I have a neighbor across the street with a huge dog and it has such sensitive hearing, it barks every time I open my front door! It's tied up in the back of her house where it can't even see my house, but it hears me unlock and open my door. So just imagine how it acts when the UPS truck comes. I have four neighbors with multiple dogs within hearing distance of my home. And one of them also has teenagers who have outdoor pool parties almost every weekend in the summer. I lived in an apartment next door to a popular bar and it was quieter than that.

Noise cancelling headphones are your friend.
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Old 12-10-2014, 02:39 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 2,766,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by staywarm2 View Post
Our biggest problem in two different apartments has been that young children (ages ~3 to 6) tend to like to jump--off couches, off beds, etc. The last apartment we lived in was really bad that way. And that little boy stayed up until 10:30 - 11:00 pm every night!! One time the mother left me a note that they were having a birthday party for him and it would be noisy. Since it was a Sunday afternoon, we went to the movies and out to lunch. Missed the party entirely! Yea!

The other issue was that the man in the apartment above us worked some sort of shift and usually took a shower around 1:00 a.m. Woke me up a lot. Then their kid would be up at 7:00 a.m. playing with noisy toys and yes, jumping!!
It's soooo easy to make a place soundproof if they built it correctly in the first place. Simply adding a layer of drywall(drywall is cheap) with a dampening compound to shared walls(floors ceilings are different) would take away the vast majority of noise complaints.

This site tells you everything you need to know about soundproofing your own apartment. This really only makes sense if you own the apartment though. People shouldn't have to do this. You should NEVER be able to hear footsteps/coughing/indoor voices/tv at a reasonable level.

https://isostore.com/research/
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Old 12-10-2014, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Bakersfield, Ca
1,842 posts, read 1,370,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikelizard860 View Post
The whole idea of a 1 year lease is draconian. All leases should be month to month.
I could NOT agree more. All the houses I lived in Europe were like this . My Dutch husband has NEVER understood this ,, apts , houses TH's whatever does not understand why they make you have long leases ,well he knows why ,but disagrees with them ..


Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
For this night shifter worker, who sleeps from 10am to 6pm everyday, I'd thoroughly enjoy living there! Let's not forget the night shift workers!!!
You WOULD love it here, I am not sure where everyone is but during the day but this place is dead quiet , probably doing the day shift at Boeing .
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Old 12-10-2014, 03:10 PM
 
1,511 posts, read 1,551,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikelizard860 View Post
The whole idea of a 1 year lease is draconian. All leases should be month to month.
A lease protects the tenant from rent increases for its duration, while month-to-month renting means rent can be raised at any time. (subject to some state-specific limitations) For a lot of renters that makes a lease of a year a good option.
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Old 12-10-2014, 03:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BATCAT View Post
A lease protects the tenant from rent increases for its duration, while month-to-month renting means rent can be raised at any time. (subject to some state-specific limitations) For a lot of renters that makes a lease of a year a good option.
If you believe that 1 year leases are there to protect tenants then I don't know what to say

The fact is the market sets rent and if the landlord started jacking rent every single month above market value(market value rent would have been the 1 year lease) like that everyone would move out of the building. That being said, rent is totally out of control in most markets and disgustingly unaffordable. Someone is getting rich on speculative real state investing and large property managment firms ect.

1 year leases are to save money for landlords. It cost money/time to paint/show the apartment ect ect. Every landlord says the same thing.
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Old 12-10-2014, 04:11 PM
 
1,511 posts, read 1,551,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikelizard860 View Post
If you believe that 1 year leases are there to protect tenants then I don't know what to say

The fact is the market sets rent and if the landlord started jacking rent every single month above market value(market value rent would have been the 1 year lease) like that everyone would move out of the building. That being said, rent is totally out of control in most markets and disgustingly unaffordable. Someone is getting rich on speculative real state investing and large property managment firms ect.

1 year leases are to save money for landlords. It cost money/time to paint/show the apartment ect ect. Every landlord says the same thing.
I have known people whose building was sold, or whose building owner suddenly got greedy, while renting month-to-month, and their rent began going up by the maximum amount allowable by law every single month until they did move out of the building. That's actually a pretty common scenario, and yes, whether or not you look at it as the lease "being there" to protect tenants, the end result is that locking in your rent for a year can absolutely be valuable to the renter.
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Old 12-10-2014, 04:11 PM
 
2,252 posts, read 2,092,190 times
Reputation: 1510
I can't sleep without my white noisemaker. I bought this thing when it was 80 bucks and IMO, it's worth it weight in gold! Highly recommend for those who have trouble sleeping at night due to noise pollution.

http://www.amazon.com/Marsona-TSCI-3.../dp/B000X2FSA2

This comes with me everywhere I go. Even Europe. I bought the battery adapter pack so no need to worry about electric conversion outside of the US.
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Old 12-10-2014, 04:13 PM
 
2,478 posts, read 4,867,202 times
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Too many factors to figure in to give a blanket answer. Every city is different. Then things vary from neighborhood to neighborhood. Then how much are you spending. You live in a poor part of town, the apartments are probably cheap, thin walls, bad neighbors, etc. Live in a ritzy area, different story. I lived in over 20 different apartment complexes during my living in Texas. Two different ones in Chicago and 2 in SLC. All 3 cities provided 3 completely different view points: Texas was bad Chicago was good, SLC is ok.
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Old 12-10-2014, 04:20 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 2,766,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BATCAT View Post
I have known people whose building was sold, or whose building owner suddenly got greedy, while renting month-to-month, and their rent began going up by the maximum amount allowable by law every single month until they did move out of the building. That's actually a pretty common scenario, and yes, whether or not you look at it as the lease "being there" to protect tenants, the end result is that locking in your rent for a year can absolutely be valuable to the renter.
You could easily lock the rent for a year and simply have a clause that you can leave with 30 days notice at any time
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Old 12-10-2014, 04:20 PM
 
2,252 posts, read 2,092,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ankhharu View Post
Too many factors to figure in to give a blanket answer. Every city is different. Then things vary from neighborhood to neighborhood. Then how much are you spending. You live in a poor part of town, the apartments are probably cheap, thin walls, bad neighbors, etc. Live in a ritzy area, different story. I lived in over 20 different apartment complexes during my living in Texas. Two different ones in Chicago and 2 in SLC. All 3 cities provided 3 completely different view points: Texas was bad Chicago was good, SLC is ok.
I agree with this. I lived in an apartment on Long Island with what I thought was so-so sound proofing. I heard neighbors every now and then - but mostly while they were outside and not very often. I now rent a townhouse in an apartment community in NC and wish I only had the noise level that I had in NY. I never thought I would move out of NY and have more noise!
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