U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > General Moving Issues
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-25-2015, 05:03 PM
 
10,604 posts, read 14,103,749 times
Reputation: 17197

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
Well, if you are going to tip the movers, tip them before they load your stuff in the truck. That's just basic common sense. I mean, it's not like tipping cows.

Sorry, couldn't resist.

Basically in the past and what I will do again in a few days, is put some sodas and bottled water in the frig's and tell them that they are for them.

I think it makes for a better move.
You should have resisted.

It's not "basic common sense".

The job is not COMPLETE until your stuff arrives at it's destination.

The ONLY time it's "basic common sense" is if there are two different crews loading and unloading which is often the case on a distant move.

So you ASK them.

What's basic common sense is you not getting your stuff or crap all broken and you already TIPPED TOO EARLY just because they packed up the truck.

OH, and I can hear them now: "Wooo Hoo water!".

They usually bring their own anyway.

Sorry, coudn't resist.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-25-2015, 05:07 PM
 
10,604 posts, read 14,103,749 times
Reputation: 17197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heidi60 View Post
Those guys make more money than most of us so I feel no obligation to tip. My last two local moves, they jacked up their charges so much that when stood in front of me wanting more money I refused. They know how to hold your belongings hostage.
That happened because you didn't understand the contracts and the potential scams of some moving companies.

They are supposed to show you the paperwork and get your signature in advance of loading the truck. And even BEFORE that you get the estimator out there for a written price. OR at least over the phone based on what you say you have to move.

Unless you're referring to packers/movers and they wanted to CHANGE the agreement because the estimator was WRONG or you added more STUFF. BEFORE the actual pack and move.

So no, of course you would not tip in that circumstance except if it was YOUR fault.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Yucaipa, California
9,715 posts, read 18,339,153 times
Reputation: 6416
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
Are you paying a flat rate for them to move you?

There is no need to tip the movers, they get paid a salary.
The entire tipping nonsense has gone over the top and is completely ridiculous for one to feel obligated to pay additional money to someone who has already been paid a flat fee and gets a salary.
I agree but buying them a inexpensive lunch wouldn't be a bad idea.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
20,840 posts, read 11,550,236 times
Reputation: 31472
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWiseWino View Post
My grandfather owned a single truck moving van and on weekends I would get roped into working for him, I got paid by gramps and I was also tipped by the homeowner and this was back in the sixties. There are all kinds of ways to move folks without destroying their stuff. You can drop and run (well within the contract) or you can stand around and help the home owner figure out where they want stuff, and then move it again when they change their mind. You can take all day, while the homeowner sits there waiting for you so they can attend to the thousands of other things that they need to do, or you can bust hump and get the job done as fast as possible. You can be a grumpy a-hole (still within the contract) or you can be a pleasant person who demonstrates that you appreciate folks belongs and show real concern for getting their stuff move the best way possible. In short, giving service above and beyond what they are simply contracted to do.

Plus it's just a nice thing to do.
This. I tipped my last movers $40 each and bought lunch. They worked their butts off and even put together furniture for me even though their policy is they only put it together if they broke it down, and these were new in the box pieces. They were also very careful, put down pads and runners to not damage my floors and double checked that I was good with all the furniture placement before they left. Yes, they got paid out of the rate they charged but IMO, they went well above and beyond.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,252 posts, read 12,464,279 times
Reputation: 22041
I was brought up in a family who gave tips to any delivery men, especially if they carried heavy items..but surely its a bit outdated to be honest... many jobs have to lift and carry items in warehouses etc where they dont meet the public.. its not fair..My mum tipped the coal man every week.. nonsense..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2015, 02:02 AM
 
Location: the Permian Basin
4,188 posts, read 3,050,924 times
Reputation: 5885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annilyna View Post
Correct me if I'm mistaken, but the flat fee is paid to the company, who in turns pays the wages of the people doing the labor, correct? To me, it would be like saying "Why should I tip the food server, when the restaurant already pays them?".
Lemme explain how the household goods (HHG) business works:

The driver and loaders are not employees of the moving company.

The driver (technically an owner-operator) is a business owner; he owns the truck and pays all the expenses (truck payment, insurance, taxes, fuel, tires, maintenance, license plates, permits, scale fees, etc.) and either owns the trailer or rents it from the company.

You pay the company. The company takes their cut and then pays the owner-operator. He then pays the crew (whom he hires) to load and/or unload the trailer.


The restaurant analogy is apples-to-oranges, for two reasons:
1. Menu price reflects a low labor cost because servers are paid less than standard minimum wage; it is expected that servers make most of their money in tips.
2. Whereas the truck driver owns the truck, servers are employees, not business owners.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2015, 05:05 AM
 
7,911 posts, read 9,613,923 times
Reputation: 13884
Last time I moved (2 bedroom TH - moving about 30 miles), I tipped the movers (there were 7 of them)$100 each. I didn't intend to, initially, but it turned out to be one of the hottest days of the year. The entire move took about 8 hours, and I was pretty thankful no one died in my driveway. As I watched them drip gallons of sweat from their heads, and not complain once, I thought about what they were making. They probably only were making about $10/ hour; thus they would only be walking away from a horrendous 8 hour day of hard labor and sweltering conditions with $100. I felt the least I could do was double that amount....and offer a beer when they were done.

(oh, and we had cases of cold water available to them, and we bought them pizza for lunch.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2015, 06:09 AM
 
2,375 posts, read 3,618,839 times
Reputation: 4579
I agree.

$100 each for tip (although I don't understand why spencgr had 7 movers for a 2BR Town Home)

LOTS of cold bottled water

Lunch for the crew, and NOT pizza. Apparently nearly everyone buys their movers pizza and even Subway sandwiches are a treat of a change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2015, 07:44 AM
 
2,133 posts, read 1,250,460 times
Reputation: 2455
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
This. I tipped my last movers $40 each and bought lunch. They worked their butts off and even put together furniture for me even though their policy is they only put it together if they broke it down, and these were new in the box pieces. They were also very careful, put down pads and runners to not damage my floors and double checked that I was good with all the furniture placement before they left. Yes, they got paid out of the rate they charged but IMO, they went well above and beyond.
Agree, when the movers go beyond and do a great job, they should be tipped. How much is up to to you. If the work is rushed and sloppy, no tip; but when they are careful and helpful; tip what you can afford, my last movers..."2 Men & a Truck," were the best I have ever worked with!!!..

Last edited by mollygee; 04-26-2015 at 07:59 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2015, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,503 posts, read 8,343,849 times
Reputation: 29024
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWiseWino View Post
My grandfather owned a single truck moving van and on weekends I would get roped into working for him, I got paid by gramps and I was also tipped by the homeowner and this was back in the sixties. There are all kinds of ways to move folks without destroying their stuff. You can drop and run (well within the contract) or you can stand around and help the home owner figure out where they want stuff, and then move it again when they change their mind. You can take all day, while the homeowner sits there waiting for you so they can attend to the thousands of other things that they need to do, or you can bust hump and get the job done as fast as possible. You can be a grumpy a-hole (still within the contract) or you can be a pleasant person who demonstrates that you appreciate folks belongs and show real concern for getting their stuff move the best way possible. In short, giving service above and beyond what they are simply contracted to do.

Plus it's just a nice thing to do.



I know you don't and I don't think that there is much that anyone can say that will help you to understand.
That's because you have no good reason to explain why movers and other servicepeople should be tipped, especially since movers charge a lot anyway (besides implying that my not doing so means I'm a witch). Once again, I'm asking the same question, and you haven't answered it. Why is a person expected to give additional monies beyond the initial cost to a serviceperson just because they did their job? I totally understand providing them with water to hydrate themselves, not rushing them, and being nice to them and treating them with respect, all of which are things I do. Not tipping them doesn't mean I'm being a jerk. It simply means I haven't tipped them. Moving people is a very hard job, without a doubt. But why give them more money just because they moved me?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > General Moving Issues
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top