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Old 07-29-2015, 12:20 PM
 
174 posts, read 187,575 times
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We are in the process of decluttering for a move next year and I am having trouble getting rid of my craft supplies. I have been "crafting" since I was a kid and still enjoy creating and designing new things. I like to find uses for the supplies I have accumulated over the years, so don't really want to buy new stuff. I did declutter my craft room (yes, I have a full room dedicated to my hobby), and got rid of about 1/3 of what I had. But I must do more because of limited space in our next home. I have tried to make a decision about what crafts really interest me and only bring those supplies, but there are new mediums I want to explore and decorative items that I want to make. My only hobby is crafting. I enjoy making things for weddings, scrapbooking, memory boxes and table decor. Whenever I see a new idea, I want to try it. I find crafting to be challenging, relaxing and satisfying. How can I cut back on my supplies and only take a reasonable amount of things with me?
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Old 07-29-2015, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
5,055 posts, read 6,007,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldentraveler View Post
How can I cut back on my supplies and only take a reasonable amount of things with me?
Begin by setting some limits. Example: for this next year only, I will not try any new things. I will instead concentrate on finishing any unfinished projects (or let those go if they no longer interest you).

Also, try setting some temporary limits on the number of different crafts you do. Example: for this next year only, I will only do scrap booking (or whatever).

By setting these temporary limits, you'll keep from adding to your supplies.

Longer term, you'll need to be brutally honest about how much room you have to store supplies in your new home. For example, one senior I know who downsized used to crochet, paint in oils, scrapbook, sew, and probably five other things I've forgotten. She downsized to a one-room apartment. She chose to do only one craft at a time, and she chose sewing and sold/gave away the remainder. When she gets tired of sewing, then she will give away most of those supplies (not the machine!) to make room for her painting stuff.

You may have more room than that, but that's an example about setting limits.

Others I know dig in their feet an insist on a "craft room," even if it's a 5' x 7' space they carve out of the basement. Even then, they have to set some limits so that they don't totally fill up their room so it becomes too crowded to use. (And I just helped dejunk one of those!)

I know this is painful because it's fun to try new things and some supplies are getting really expensive! But very few of us have unlimited space for everything that we want to do. )-:
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Old 07-29-2015, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Florida
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Keep tools, donate materials. I did the same.
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Old 07-29-2015, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,531,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meemur View Post
Begin by setting some limits. Example: for this next year only, I will not try any new things. I will instead concentrate on finishing any unfinished projects (or let those go if they no longer interest you).

Also, try setting some temporary limits on the number of different crafts you do. Example: for this next year only, I will only do scrap booking (or whatever).

By setting these temporary limits, you'll keep from adding to your supplies.

Longer term, you'll need to be brutally honest about how much room you have to store supplies in your new home. For example, one senior I know who downsized used to crochet, paint in oils, scrapbook, sew, and probably five other things I've forgotten. She downsized to a one-room apartment. She chose to do only one craft at a time, and she chose sewing and sold/gave away the remainder. When she gets tired of sewing, then she will give away most of those supplies (not the machine!) to make room for her painting stuff.

You may have more room than that, but that's an example about setting limits.

Others I know dig in their feet an insist on a "craft room," even if it's a 5' x 7' space they carve out of the basement. Even then, they have to set some limits so that they don't totally fill up their room so it becomes too crowded to use. (And I just helped dejunk one of those!)

I know this is painful because it's fun to try new things and some supplies are getting really expensive! But very few of us have unlimited space for everything that we want to do. )-:
Poor woman. So she has to go out and BUY more yarn to crochet when she wants to make something now. She can't go to her stash since someone else decided she shouldn't have one. And if you stitch, those odds and ends of beautiful colors work beautifully for that too. And what if she's sewing but she doesn't feel like it right then, wants to stitch something. But wait... she has to go and spend her money on all the supplies. Huge fail if you are a craft loving person. Many of us have projects all going at once with different stuff. If she keeps it in boxes under the bed or in the closet or where ever its being worked on, its only her business.

Why waste money buying new stuff when you don't NEED to?

When I moved, I brought all my craft supplies. This included the fabric, yarn, beads and so on. I do stitching, crocheting, beading and combinations of them. I'd spent two years accumulating cheap supplies mostly from thrift stores. It didn't cost me much there. No thift stores where I live now so it would cost quite a bit. I wouldn't have ever left my stuff behind. Crafts are deeply important to me, and the ends and pieces and random yarn which looks useless to many is a treasure trove for me. I'd never let anyone 'dejunk' my stuff. They would have no idea why some of it was kept, but I also take things apart for the useful pieces.

This is my passion. It was just as important as my clothes, and books. I brought all my books too. I've added to them since. Most are non fiction. I've heard people say someone has 'too many books' but personally I think that's up to the person if they do.

I think some people have too many clothes. Why do you need so many skirts and dresses and most of all almost identical shoes? Who cares if its 'in style'? A few good pairs of jeans, a couple dresses for the occasion, some sweaters, and lots of tanks to wear under things in winter (they really help keep you warm) and I'm good. I have more boots than I need, but love those boots. I've added the cold weather winter thermal collection since moving and actually wear out the warm boots by wearing them all winter. But some would say why so many boots, so many shirts, and out of style stuff? Me, I don't care about style.

So what you like and want and use and value are up to you, not ever someone else.

If you have a craft you love, and you have collected lots of odds and ends, fill up a box and take them with you. If you make a craft room and someone says its too crowded or it junky tell them to go home and worry about their own. If its stuff you use, don't let people tell you your likes and your hobbies are not valuable enough to take up some space.

I have three stitchings in process, and a bunch of yarn in a box, the art sketched so far for them taking up half the couch, and work on them when I have an idea. I never use patters, just start and see what it becomes, and want the stuff there when the inspiration comes. Maybe not so neat but that is something which is up to each of us seperately. Don't toss just because someone shames you into it when they have no idea how you feel. MYOB is a very good thing.

I don't get why people spend so much on 'fashion' but I'm not going to tell them not to...but to me its just a waste of good money and time. Both of us are right--- for our SELF. Be you. Ignore people who want you to be them.

Last edited by nightbird47; 07-29-2015 at 01:17 PM..
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Old 07-29-2015, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,531,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldentraveler View Post
We are in the process of decluttering for a move next year and I am having trouble getting rid of my craft supplies. I have been "crafting" since I was a kid and still enjoy creating and designing new things. I like to find uses for the supplies I have accumulated over the years, so don't really want to buy new stuff. I did declutter my craft room (yes, I have a full room dedicated to my hobby), and got rid of about 1/3 of what I had. But I must do more because of limited space in our next home. I have tried to make a decision about what crafts really interest me and only bring those supplies, but there are new mediums I want to explore and decorative items that I want to make. My only hobby is crafting. I enjoy making things for weddings, scrapbooking, memory boxes and table decor. Whenever I see a new idea, I want to try it. I find crafting to be challenging, relaxing and satisfying. How can I cut back on my supplies and only take a reasonable amount of things with me?
Think about how much it would cost to replace it. As someone else said, keep tools. You'll need them and there is no reason to have to buy new ones. And consider how you work. Do you, say, keep a stash of yarns handy? And some material to use for small projects which means you don't need to buy it again? Yarn and material can be expensive. Why not buy some space bags, take all the soft squishable stuff, and pack it together. Or you can get the smaller ones and divide it and flatten them. You can stuff a whole lot of it in one box that way. But DO use a box and put something soft around it. The space bags can puncture if you don't protect them. You can use the smaller ones and just keep it at its new location in them until you use them.

Also, think about what you do most and what really is you best hobbies. And do you multitask, and have a couple of projects going at all times? Keep something out you can work on. Moving and packing are stressful. Most crafting hobbies and destressing. You get more done if you have some nice unstressed breaks.

You can do what I did with the stuff in the kitchen too. When you pack a box, and there's a space for some small item, have a priority box of craft stuff and fill it with that. Got material? Wrap something being packed with it. If its all small stuff, pack it in little boxes which can fit into odd spaces in bigger boxes. One golden rule of packing is never leave empty spaces. I stuffed yarn and fabric and anything which wouldn't be damaged into the small ones between items so the items didn't get damaged and the stuff came home with me.

For cutting back for moving purposes, remember cost and availability. Things which are costly to replace, take. Things which are hard to find, definately take. Stuff you especially love to work with, take. Stuff with reuse status, but good, stuff box, for those odd places. I don't scrapbook, but I know the supplies are expensive. I'd try the space bags with it as well, possibly combined with softer stuff.

If after you move, you want to reduce space used for storage, remember the space bags. The smaller ones are best for this since you don't have to open a lot of stuff.

I found one of the most important continuities in moving was my craft stuff. It tied the old and the new together. I have so many more places to put things since the house has no decoration.
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Old 07-29-2015, 01:52 PM
 
16,720 posts, read 14,681,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldentraveler View Post
We are in the process of decluttering for a move next year and I am having trouble getting rid of my craft supplies. I have been "crafting" since I was a kid and still enjoy creating and designing new things. I like to find uses for the supplies I have accumulated over the years, so don't really want to buy new stuff. I did declutter my craft room (yes, I have a full room dedicated to my hobby), and got rid of about 1/3 of what I had. But I must do more because of limited space in our next home. I have tried to make a decision about what crafts really interest me and only bring those supplies, but there are new mediums I want to explore and decorative items that I want to make. My only hobby is crafting. I enjoy making things for weddings, scrapbooking, memory boxes and table decor. Whenever I see a new idea, I want to try it. I find crafting to be challenging, relaxing and satisfying. How can I cut back on my supplies and only take a reasonable amount of things with me?
Donate them to a local shelter for women and children.
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Old 07-29-2015, 01:54 PM
 
3,646 posts, read 9,622,245 times
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As a crafter, I feel your pain!

I got rid of the stuff I'd collected and/or would be easy to replace. I went through it all carefully and donated a lot of leftover stuff - for instance, from my candlemaking phase. I want to do this again "someday", so only kept the tools, as another poster wrote.

Letting go of some of it was very freeing. I find now that I want to get through some supplies - I'm working on scrap afghans for instance right now, to get through my yarn stash. Fighting myself not to buy more yarn as I go and realize how great some color would be that I don't have enough for to continue in the pattern !

Good luck. Remember - when you get rid of the old, you're making room for the new!
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Old 07-29-2015, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,832 posts, read 14,341,548 times
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I like the idea of keeping tools and donating a lot of materials.

Honestly, we can't tell you what to do. If you are moving to a place that has less room for your hobby, you need to find a bigger place, or sacrifice something. I did this. I went through all my stuff and halved it. I decided I would probably never use some of the specialized tools I had accumulated, so I donated them. I got rid of a lot of cloth material, but kept the stuff I hoped to use eventually.

I had to make choices. I got rid of perhaps 1/2 of my stuff from my craft room. And it is a good thing. I have about 1/2 the space for crafting/sewing now.

But we can't make those choices for you. You will have to do this. But you know what? For all the stuff you throw out or donate, you will probably gather almost the same amount back in a couple of years of crafting in your new location.
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Old 07-30-2015, 07:19 PM
 
174 posts, read 187,575 times
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Thank you Meemur, for your advice. I know I have to set some limits for myself, so my crafting doesn't get out of had. That's the reason DH has allowed me to have my own craft room...so I can keep everything "contained"! Of course, he has his fishing and his golf, so he pretty much said I can have a craft space in our next home, but of course, I will share the space with him. I will definitely go through my stash and seriously see what I can pare down. You're also right about having so much stuff that you don't have room to "work on your crafts".

Thank you Nightbird. Love your idea about the space bags. And I will surely remember your wise words about "cost and availability".

Thank you SSKKC, you are probably right that for whatever I get rid of, I'll have space for new craft items. Never thought of it that way.

Thanks Silibran, I too got rid of (donated) 1/2 of my stuff, but I will make an honest attempt to do more. If I really need anything, there is a Michael's and an ACMoore in the town we're thinking of moving to, and a Hobby Lobby about 30 minutes away.

Thank you all, appreciate your advice.
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Old 07-30-2015, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,914,959 times
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My first thought was, Would a man consider getting rid of his tools? His fishing stuff? His golfing stuff? And if he says he wants to, how much you want to bet it's because he wants to buy brand new stuff?

Why are women always supposed to be the ones to get rid of their tools, supplies and hobby stuff?

To heck with that. You've already gotten rid of a lot of your stuff. That's enough. Keep the rest and think of it in terms of your hubby has to share YOUR craft space - not that you are having to share HIS space.

You'll find creative ways to store it. I now live in a 115 square foot studio apartment and I have shelves to the ceiling. I have a sewing station and a leatherworking station. The sewing station also functions as my desk, with shelves with bins above it for sewing materials, my sewing machine sits in a pretty wooden antique box that doubles as my side table next to my big chair. I have boxes of stuff on top of the kitchen cupboards. My dresser doubles as a leather-working and workbench station, and I added metal pegboards above the dresser and the desk for tools, etc.

Where there is a will there is a way. And craft supplies are expensive! Unless you really think you won't use the supplies you still have, then you should take them with you. In my opinion. If hubby gives you a hard time, tell him you'll get rid of $100 worth of craft supplies for every $100 worth of his stuff he gets rid of.
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