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Old 08-09-2015, 08:10 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,269,031 times
Reputation: 7522

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IMO focus on a better relationship with your mother. What is she nagging about?
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:24 AM
 
Location: SC
1,959 posts, read 1,157,860 times
Reputation: 3176
Get some sleep. Wake up and take a shower, have some breakfast...then go out and hit the streets to find employment.
Making yourself homeless, without an address, is not the way to move on.
Yes, you need a physical address to get a job. You need transportation. You have a place to live at the moment.
Make the best of it!
You're still young enough to not mess it all up.
Oh...rinse and repeat ..till gainful employment is found.
Apply everywhere in your area. Make yourself known that you are looking for a job.
When you get all of this accomplished.... THEN seek new living conditions!! Nobody will rent to someone who is homeless and living out of their car.

PS-surely that college education is worth something?
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:28 AM
 
4,367 posts, read 3,536,407 times
Reputation: 2925
Here are a few suggestions:

Stay where you are
Do you have any kind of job where you can make or save money? Even if it's only $200 per week, if you have no expenses, stay there and work and save until you can move and establish yourself elsewhere. If you have an internet connection, take online classes through a reputable state university.

Relocate and go back to school
If your "young and dumb" mistakes didn't include messing with your college education, look into government programs that will allow you to enroll in a program for free at one of the local universities. Enroll and look into getting some on-campus (or off-campus) housing if the location is somewhere you might want to live and work. On-campus housing is expensive, but it would give you a ready address for potential employers, and it would allow you to move away immediately and start working on learning new skills. (Some student apartments allow lease takeovers, where an incoming student can take over the apartment of a graduating student. Some of the fees are waived during this agreement, so it is more affordable.) After you've moved on campus, you could start looking for off-campus housing options before the next semester, or year, starts. (Room shares are a great option.) Major in a field related to math, science, or business. Check out the local employment office to get an idea of what is in demand that you might like to do.

Find a good job
Get out there and try to network. Move to a decent-sized city that has a high employment rate, and sign up with a temp agency. Look for jobs through friends in the area. Pester the employment office until they tell you what your options are. Ask about government aid and right to work programs.

Keep the car
You will need reliable transportation to get to work, assuming you don't move to an area that is quite public transportation, bicycle, or pedestrian friendly. Your car can also help you carry supplies to and from internships, and you may actually be able to make a little money transporting groceries or other items for friends in the area or helping people move and clean.

Network
Use your professors to get better job opportunities. Be open with them about what your goals are and how you plan to achieve them, and ask for feedback and information on how to break into the field you want to pursue. There are often entry-level positions in every industry that require very little education to start but will look great on the final resume and pay pretty well, as well.

Find a roommate (or four) and brainstorm about how to cut expenses
You should have moved out of on-campus housing by now, and you should be somewhere where you can have at least one or two more roommates (assuming you aren't still renting a room). Put up bunk beds to maximize space and make compromises so that you can get cheaper rent. Take an honest look at your expenses, and see if you need everything you have. If you have a good internet connection coming into your apartment building from the 24-hour diner, you don't need to subscribe to internet; cut it off.

Last edited by krmb; 08-09-2015 at 08:39 AM..
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:33 AM
 
Location: SC
1,959 posts, read 1,157,860 times
Reputation: 3176
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
Here are a few suggestions:

Stay where you are
Do you have any kind of job where you can make or save money? Even if it's only $200 per week, if you have no expenses, stay there and work and save until you can move and establish yourself elsewhere. If you have an internet connection, take online classes through a reputable state university.

Relocate and go back to school
If your "young and dumb" mistakes didn't include messing with your college education, look into government subsidies that will allow you to enroll in a program at one of the local universities. Enroll and look into getting some on-campus (or off-campus) housing if the location is somewhere you might want to live and work. On-campus housing is expensive, but it would give you a ready address for potential employers, and it would allow you to move away immediately and start working on learning new skills. After you've moved on campus, you could start looking for off-campus housing options before the next semester, or year, starts. Major in a field related to math, science, or business. Check out the local employment office to get an idea of what is in demand that you might like to do.

Find a good job
Get out there and try to network. Move to a decent-sized city that has a high employment rate, and sign up with a temp agency. Look for jobs through friends in the area. Pester the employment office until they tell you what your options are. Ask about government aid and right to work programs.

Keep the car
You will need reliable transportation to get to work, assuming you don't move to an area that is quite public transportation, bicycle, or pedestrian friendly. Your car can also help you carry supplies to and from internships, and you may actually be able to make a little money transporting groceries or other items for friends in the area or helping people move and clean.

Network
Use your professors to get better job opportunities. Be open with them about what your goals are and how you plan to achieve them, and ask for feedback and information on how to break into the field you want to pursue. There are often entry-level positions in every industry that require very little education to start but will look great on the final resume and pay pretty well, as well.

Find a roommate (or four) and brainstorm about how to cut expenses
You should have moved out of on-campus housing by now, and you should be somewhere where you can have at least one or two more roommates (assuming you aren't still renting a room). Put up bunk beds to maximize space and make compromises so that you can get cheaper rent. Take an honest look at your expenses, and see if you need everything you have. If you have a good internet connection to your apartment building from the 24 hour diner, you don't need to subscribe to internet; cut it off.

Yes!! All of the quoted!! Much better explained than I was able to
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:48 AM
 
4,367 posts, read 3,536,407 times
Reputation: 2925
Oh, and I'm going to add one more thing to this list. Take care of your mom and help her out as much as you can. Living with your parents can be a difficult arrangement, but you are an adult now. If you want to be treated like one, start showing her you are responsible. Take over most of the chores in the house. Help her with expenses. Make her life easier while you are staying with her. She's doing you a tremendous favor that you are likely not to find in the real world. Few people will allow you to stay at their house for free without expecting A WHOLE LOT in return from you, so cherish this opportunity. Show her you are grateful. Believe it or not, parents and friends have an expiration date. You may not have them forever. You'll only have the lessons and love they taught you. Be kind to them while you have the chance.
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:52 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,269,031 times
Reputation: 7522
+1 to the last three posts!!!!!!!!
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Old 08-09-2015, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,812 posts, read 23,754,084 times
Reputation: 30550
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
IMO focus on a better relationship with your mother. What is she nagging about?
Good question.
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Old 08-09-2015, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,812 posts, read 23,754,084 times
Reputation: 30550
Quote:
Originally Posted by moxiegal View Post
Get some sleep. Wake up and take a shower, have some breakfast...then go out and hit the streets to find employment.
Making yourself homeless, without an address, is not the way to move on.
Yes, you need a physical address to get a job. You need transportation. You have a place to live at the moment.
Make the best of it!
You're still young enough to not mess it all up.
Oh...rinse and repeat ..till gainful employment is found.
Apply everywhere in your area. Make yourself known that you are looking for a job.
When you get all of this accomplished.... THEN seek new living conditions!! Nobody will rent to someone who is homeless and living out of their car.

PS-surely that college education is worth something?
Yes, do something now. It sounds to me as though you're ready to make your next mistake. A thousand dollars and a car? That's not much in the scheme of things.

How are you "paying" mom? Are you taking out the trash, cleaning, cooking, doing laundry, pulling weeds? Vacuum the furniture. Paint the living room.

Get a job, save more money, have a plan.

I sympathize about trying to sleep with a lot of noise. That bothers me, too. On the other hand, if you're tired enough, you could probably sleep on the shoulder of the interstate and not notice. When you're busy, active for 18 hours a day, you don't have to worry about falling asleep because you lapse into unconsciousness moments after lying down--or in a chair. I was once so tired that I fell asleep with my eyes open. That hurt.
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Old 08-09-2015, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Florida
5,814 posts, read 2,707,356 times
Reputation: 7038
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
Here are a few suggestions:

Stay where you are
Do you have any kind of job where you can make or save money? Even if it's only $200 per week, if you have no expenses, stay there and work and save until you can move and establish yourself elsewhere. If you have an internet connection, take online classes through a reputable state university.

Relocate and go back to school
If your "young and dumb" mistakes didn't include messing with your college education, look into government programs that will allow you to enroll in a program for free at one of the local universities. Enroll and look into getting some on-campus (or off-campus) housing if the location is somewhere you might want to live and work. On-campus housing is expensive, but it would give you a ready address for potential employers, and it would allow you to move away immediately and start working on learning new skills. (Some student apartments allow lease takeovers, where an incoming student can take over the apartment of a graduating student. Some of the fees are waived during this agreement, so it is more affordable.) After you've moved on campus, you could start looking for off-campus housing options before the next semester, or year, starts. (Room shares are a great option.) Major in a field related to math, science, or business. Check out the local employment office to get an idea of what is in demand that you might like to do.

Find a good job
Get out there and try to network. Move to a decent-sized city that has a high employment rate, and sign up with a temp agency. Look for jobs through friends in the area. Pester the employment office until they tell you what your options are. Ask about government aid and right to work programs.

Keep the car
You will need reliable transportation to get to work, assuming you don't move to an area that is quite public transportation, bicycle, or pedestrian friendly. Your car can also help you carry supplies to and from internships, and you may actually be able to make a little money transporting groceries or other items for friends in the area or helping people move and clean.

Network
Use your professors to get better job opportunities. Be open with them about what your goals are and how you plan to achieve them, and ask for feedback and information on how to break into the field you want to pursue. There are often entry-level positions in every industry that require very little education to start but will look great on the final resume and pay pretty well, as well.

Find a roommate (or four) and brainstorm about how to cut expenses
You should have moved out of on-campus housing by now, and you should be somewhere where you can have at least one or two more roommates (assuming you aren't still renting a room). Put up bunk beds to maximize space and make compromises so that you can get cheaper rent. Take an honest look at your expenses, and see if you need everything you have. If you have a good internet connection coming into your apartment building from the 24-hour diner, you don't need to subscribe to internet; cut it off.
Excellent advice! I don't think OP realizes how well off he is with having a roof over his head , food and transportation at his dispose. I wonder how many of us can drive a few miles from where we live and encounter the homeless with no roof or food or job and very few resources.
If it's that bad save your $1000 , get a job and save until you are financially able to afford the things you want. Let the psychotic cats be your motivation!
Best of Luck!
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Old 08-09-2015, 12:20 PM
 
Location: CT
3,461 posts, read 1,847,070 times
Reputation: 4614
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryinbaby View Post
I am a 23 year old who, after making some really "young and dumb" mistakes (and spending too much money), found himself living with his mother in a backwater rural/post-industrial area in a tiny house near the highway and the airport and with plenty of spastic cats. There is no space for me here. I have a panic attack every day I feel so claustrophobic, and I can't stand my mother's constant nagging. She does not want me here, and I do not want to be here. I think I would get more peace and quiet sleeping in my car parked in the woods somewhere -- at least I probably wouldn't have to lie awake in bed listening to the roar of the interstate.

I have just over $1,000, a 2011 Honda Civic -- which I was fortunate enough to receive used as a college graduation gift. I own a lot of other expensive things, but I'd like to keep most of them. I have never had any trouble finding low-level retail and restaurant work when there's reason to. I have the charm and looks to get what I want from people.

What are some hypothetical ways I could make this work? Let's pretend staying here is not an option.
I'm going to offer some fatherly advice, it doesn't sound like your Dad is in the picture. GROW UP SON! You made it through high school, someone(?) paid for your college education(?), gave you a car, and now your Mom has let you live at home until you've gotten on your own feet. What's your degree in? Use it! It may not be a job in the neighborhood, go find it, and it's not going to be easy but you'll never move ahead until you START MOVING. I don't know you or your mother, but I'm willing to bet she's riding your a$$ to get a good job, would I be right? I'm thinking that if you show some enthusiasm about putting a plan together, like starting a job hunt, making some projections of where you want to be in five years, or ten, or twenty, she'd be a lot more lenient and willing to work with you. Even if she's not, it's your life, you're an adult, now act like one.
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