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Old 09-11-2015, 08:57 AM
 
382 posts, read 715,697 times
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Of course, you don't want to end up losing money, but sometimes as you said, there are other factors to the decision. We have made several long-distance moves in the past 10 years, starting from a fairly low-cost state (Ohio) and progressing upwards from there. My husband and I do not look at the salary alone. Yes, our family needs to survive, but our family needs to be happy, our children need to be receiving a good education, and my husband needs to enjoy his work. The experience alone at several of his jobs more than made up for stretching our dollars due to a higher COL. Now we have moved to a more reasonable state (TN) and no longer have children in the home.

 
Old 09-12-2015, 03:28 PM
Status: "busy" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
16,781 posts, read 25,838,796 times
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There are high COL areas and then there are REALLY high COL areas like metro NYC and California (SanDiego, LA, the Bay Area). Make sure you know what your getting into. If you're moving to one of the area I mention, you probably need to more than double your salary, because online calculators don't into account what it really costs to do the things you'd want to do (or think you would do) living in the those places. Let's say you want to live on Long Island to be close to NYC and take advantage of all it offers. That is going to take a lot of money (and time) on a regular basis.

This is why people are asking where you're coming from and where you're considering. It actually does make a difference.
 
Old 09-12-2015, 04:38 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 11,424,886 times
Reputation: 12307
Quote:
Originally Posted by twingles View Post
This is why people are asking where you're coming from and where you're considering. It actually does make a difference.
Exactly why I asked the same.
 
Old 09-14-2015, 02:19 AM
 
75 posts, read 71,321 times
Reputation: 180
Lots of people who move from low income/COL states to high income/COL states are young, college-educated, upwardly mobile and generally don't have much interest in settling down anytime soon (i.e., getting married, buying a home, having kids, etc.). These younger people aren't too preoccupied with the higher COL because they know the professional and higher educational opportunities afforded to them in their new locale will most likely far surpass those in their previous low income/COL state.

For example, I went to undergrad in Arizona, and just about all of the kids I went to school with who grew up there are now living in high COL cities such as NYC, LA, SF, DC, Boston, Seattle and Austin among others. Some of them fretted about the higher COL in their soon-to-be homes prior to moving away from Arizona; however, they were all in agreement that leaving Arizona and its low-wage service-oriented economy was the best move they could make from a career standpoint.

Usually, in high COL states, employers in most industries will pay salaries that are proportional to the COL. Of course, some low-skill industries like retail and hospitality are low-paying regardless of where you live, but careers in the professional services sector as well as skilled trade will compensate accordingly given the location.

Don't forget, most high COL states are non-RTW states, and states without RTW laws have long, storied histories of collective bargaining among unionized employees, which has historically kept wages higher/more competitive in the global marketplace.

As someone whose lived in both high and low COL states, including your home state of Arizona, I've observed the reverse of what you anticipate will happen with you and your husband. Quite often, I've seen people move from high COL states like California, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts or Illinois to low COL states with a 20-30% lower COL like Arizona, Florida, South Carolina and Tennessee, only to take a 50% pay cut.

For example, I know of someone who works in the financial services sector in Florida who is making half of what she was making in Rhode Island in 1999. Really sad, if you ask me. I can think of plenty more examples. These people would have been better off had they stayed in their previous higher COL state.
 
Old 09-14-2015, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Arizona
1,599 posts, read 1,361,167 times
Reputation: 4876
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belmont_Boy View Post
Lots of people who move from low income/COL states to high income/COL states are young, college-educated, upwardly mobile and generally don't have much interest in settling down anytime soon (i.e., getting married, buying a home, having kids, etc.). These younger people aren't too preoccupied with the higher COL because they know the professional and higher educational opportunities afforded to them in their new locale will most likely far surpass those in their previous low income/COL state.

For example, I went to undergrad in Arizona, and just about all of the kids I went to school with who grew up there are now living in high COL cities such as NYC, LA, SF, DC, Boston, Seattle and Austin among others. Some of them fretted about the higher COL in their soon-to-be homes prior to moving away from Arizona; however, they were all in agreement that leaving Arizona and its low-wage service-oriented economy was the best move they could make from a career standpoint.

Usually, in high COL states, employers in most industries will pay salaries that are proportional to the COL. Of course, some low-skill industries like retail and hospitality are low-paying regardless of where you live, but careers in the professional services sector as well as skilled trade will compensate accordingly given the location.

Don't forget, most high COL states are non-RTW states, and states without RTW laws have long, storied histories of collective bargaining among unionized employees, which has historically kept wages higher/more competitive in the global marketplace.

As someone whose lived in both high and low COL states, including your home state of Arizona, I've observed the reverse of what you anticipate will happen with you and your husband. Quite often, I've seen people move from high COL states like California, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts or Illinois to low COL states with a 20-30% lower COL like Arizona, Florida, South Carolina and Tennessee, only to take a 50% pay cut.

For example, I know of someone who works in the financial services sector in Florida who is making half of what she was making in Rhode Island in 1999. Really sad, if you ask me. I can think of plenty more examples. These people would have been better off had they stayed in their previous higher COL state.
Hi.thanks!! I assumed the new place would pay him an appropriate salary, but when comparing his salary to.other places it just seems crazy to me he would make that much more somewhere else. In some places his salary more than doubles! I guess living in and dealing with low-wage states all our lives, we are just used to being offered what the employer can get away with (and Arizona is not our home state . We unfortunately just love here and it's very unpleasant ha ha ).

This does give me hope everything will work out and we'll be able to afford our new destination, wherever it may be. Thanks again!
 
Old 09-14-2015, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
Reputation: 27576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belmont_Boy View Post
Lots of people who move from low income/COL states to high income/COL states are young, college-educated, upwardly mobile and generally don't have much interest in settling down anytime soon (i.e., getting married, buying a home, having kids, etc.). These younger people aren't too preoccupied with the higher COL because they know the professional and higher educational opportunities afforded to them in their new locale will most likely far surpass those in their previous low income/COL state.

For example, I went to undergrad in Arizona, and just about all of the kids I went to school with who grew up there are now living in high COL cities such as NYC, LA, SF, DC, Boston, Seattle and Austin among others. Some of them fretted about the higher COL in their soon-to-be homes prior to moving away from Arizona; however, they were all in agreement that leaving Arizona and its low-wage service-oriented economy was the best move they could make from a career standpoint.

Usually, in high COL states, employers in most industries will pay salaries that are proportional to the COL. Of course, some low-skill industries like retail and hospitality are low-paying regardless of where you live, but careers in the professional services sector as well as skilled trade will compensate accordingly given the location.

Don't forget, most high COL states are non-RTW states, and states without RTW laws have long, storied histories of collective bargaining among unionized employees, which has historically kept wages higher/more competitive in the global marketplace.

As someone whose lived in both high and low COL states, including your home state of Arizona, I've observed the reverse of what you anticipate will happen with you and your husband. Quite often, I've seen people move from high COL states like California, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts or Illinois to low COL states with a 20-30% lower COL like Arizona, Florida, South Carolina and Tennessee, only to take a 50% pay cut.

For example, I know of someone who works in the financial services sector in Florida who is making half of what she was making in Rhode Island in 1999. Really sad, if you ask me. I can think of plenty more examples. These people would have been better off had they stayed in their previous higher COL state.
Same here. I'm from the South and it is almost impossible to find decent paying work.
 
Old 09-14-2015, 03:09 PM
 
15,402 posts, read 7,868,802 times
Reputation: 7988
I agree it depends on where you are coming from/moving to.

I moved from a higher COL location back to my hometown last year which has a lower COL.

I especially wanted to mention that just because a place has a higher COL doesn't mean that they have better schools for kids. Where we live now has better schools and I actually got a raise from what I making in my previous location (moved from SE to Mid West) and so now I have a much beter QOL in regards to finances/expenses.

I think that if you are looking at moving to a high COL location that you need to really do your research on housing costs. IMO many COL calculators don't give all that great information as they don't take into consideration the utility cost or daycare charges for kids (before/after school care) and other things that may be higher or lower depending on location.

You also should consider what field that you and/or your significant other work's in and if it is a higher demand field where you are planning on moving to. I moved from the SE to the Midwest and I work in government contracting and consulting. COL is higher where I lived but the wages in the Midwest versus the SE are practically the same, yet housing and other costs (utility and food) are cheaper. So it really does depend on where you are moving and your field. If you are in IT in the SE you may command a better salary. If you are in government and moving to DC, you will get a much higher salary but housing costs are higher though other items may be cheaper. If you are in Finance, living in Chicago or NYC you will get paid more and have better career opportunities, so it really does depend.

Some areas focus on specific niches in a career field. Also, sometimes you may move to a higher COL location and get paid less. My aunt moved from Detroit metro to Atlanta metro and is an RN and has lived in Atlanta metro for about 5 years but still complains that she got paid more in Detroit and that housing costs were much cheaper as were utililties. She is planning on moving back to the Detroit metro after her youngest graduates high school in a couple years due to that.
 
Old 09-21-2015, 01:16 AM
 
2,702 posts, read 3,736,488 times
Reputation: 4520
Each place you move to is different.. Each job and company is different.. And NO not all the higher COL places have great schools...

Unless you are getting a sizable raise in another place I would not even consider it.. You also have to figure in the cost of the move, setting up in the new place, deposits, etc... If you are getting a 30% raise and the COL is %37 you are already losing before you get there....

I had the change to move from Colorado to Hawaii with a 25% Raise and my moving expenses taken care of.... AND help with getting settled there... Sounds good huh???

BUT the COL was 45%... So not such a good thing...
 
Old 09-22-2015, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,534 posts, read 7,826,428 times
Reputation: 13276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennies4Penny View Post
A TWO HOUR drive. Geez, let's just zip into town shall we .
Why, yes, actually, many people in Northern Wyoming do just that! In fact, many of us when I lived there had Commissary privileges, so a one hour drive to the nearest small AFB was not at all uncommon. However, 6 hours to the nearest large base was too much.
Now that the base is only 3 to 4 hours away, it is not uncommon to drive up there to shop at the Commissary and Exchange!
This ain't the big city, this is the wide open spaces! We drive an hour or two to go camping here, and think nothing of it!
So, yes, when we lived in Northern WY it was normal to "zip into town" once or twice a month to go shopping and/or see a show. It was not at all uncommon to see WY license plates in the store parking lots in and around Billings, MT. In fact, it still isn't!
 
Old 02-08-2018, 12:32 PM
 
Location: California
654 posts, read 486,491 times
Reputation: 955
Quote:
Originally Posted by twingles View Post
There are high COL areas and then there are REALLY high COL areas like metro NYC and California (SanDiego, LA, the Bay Area). Make sure you know what your getting into. If you're moving to one of the area I mention, you probably need to more than double your salary, because online calculators don't into account what it really costs to do the things you'd want to do (or think you would do) living in the those places. Let's say you want to live on Long Island to be close to NYC and take advantage of all it offers. That is going to take a lot of money (and time) on a regular basis.

This is why people are asking where you're coming from and where you're considering. It actually does make a difference.
Agreed. Id caution about moving to very high cost of living areas if you have children. If not, you can always get roommates.

I make 50k more in the bay area than NC. My overall housing situation is awful but I also surf and my family lives here.

I'm looking into saving money and moving out of the country eventually.
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