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Old 10-07-2015, 03:08 PM
 
22 posts, read 15,291 times
Reputation: 15

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If you want, I'll give you an example of my fall semester schedule:

6A Wake up and get ready for school
7:30A-11:30A School time
11:30A-12:00P Lunch
12:00-6:30P Work
7P-10P (Briefly worked a second job, because it was from the summer months, but I eventually quit to focus on school. Otherwise, this time was for studying).
11P Bed

On the weekends, I worked Saturday morning at the bank and had another job for Friday, Saturday, and Sunday evening hours.

I was blessed that at my bank, they didn't have any problem with me working on my school work when customers weren't bustling in during busy hours. I'd also work on homework at my other jobs when I'd have a break. In another words, I fit school work in wherever I could and I made it work.

Once in awhile, I ate something. I'm kidding. I did have time to go to friend's houses and do things typical teenagers do. It wasn't all work and no play.

When I was in the local community college, my schedule was basically the same. I did start off taking a night class after leaving work at 6PM, but I quickly realized I couldn't do it. I started the semester off hopeful of doing 17 credit hours, but when I dropped that night class, I was down to 12 credit hours. It was still a full semester, but my point is to recognize your limitations and stick with what works, not what you wish worked.

I just noticed you said you'd only work 30 hours a week. Can I be honest? That's not going to work. You'll never make it. If you want to make it, trust me, you'll need to work full-time or more. It can be done, but again, I emphasize only if you're wise and make intelligent decisions with your time.

Consider that the average minimum wage job is $7.50. Uncle Sam is going to take roughly 20% of that, so you're left with $6 per hour. At 30 hours per week, your net pay is only going to be $180/week or roughly $720/month (slightly more, but I'm using four weeks).

-Rent (no more than 1/3 your income) - $240/mo (at that cost, it'd have to be a room and could only be more if utilities were included)
-Utilities (no more than 1/4 your income) - $180
-Car repair, insurance, and gas (you'll have to buy one with cash, because a payment here won't work) - $200/month is a conservative number in my estimate

This leaves you with $100 for food and supplies.

Savings? Scare to be found with only 30 hours per week. Based on my four-week model above, you might get the two "freebie" paychecks per year if you're paid bi-weekly, but that's only a $360/year savings. Uncle Sam might be so kind as to return a few hundred dollars of your money, too, I suppose.

Emergency? You'll probably need to call Mom and Dad for help.

I didn't even factor in mandated health insurance, but at that pay, you won't need to pay a fine come tax time. You just need to hope you don't need medical personnel to pay for unexpected medical bills if you can't afford it. Maybe you'd still be on your parents plan?

If your family is willing to supplement, then 30 hours per week would be feasible, but if you're wanting to do this entirely on your own, 30 hours per week is just not realistic. I worked about 50-60 hours per week and went to school full-time that spring semester, but believe me, I was busy and exhausted by the end of it. It can be done, but mentally prepare yourself for that.

There's a lot to consider, which is why your parents are probably not supporting this, because they know it's difficult. Personally, if my kids want to do it, I'll let them. However, I'm going to strongly encourage them not to do it and just stay home, help around the house, and save the money they'd otherwise give someone else, so that they can someday put that money towards something better (e.g. down payment on a house or buying a house in cash). Lots to consider, young one.

 
Old 10-07-2015, 03:56 PM
 
26,579 posts, read 52,109,940 times
Reputation: 20358
My brother moved out the day after graduation.... he was 17

He had a job and a place to live and stayed there the 4 years he attended UC Berkeley...

Been on his own since... did not own a car because it was too expensive... got around rain or shine with a old Motorcycle...

He supported himself working Friday night and weekends at a Horse Boarding Barn and rented a studio apartment on site...

Very minimal in all ways... and not much time for socializing... today, he manages almost a Billion Dollars in Commercial Real Estate...

Last edited by Ultrarunner; 10-07-2015 at 05:26 PM..
 
Old 10-07-2015, 05:19 PM
 
13 posts, read 14,421 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabbythecat View Post
You sound mature. But what you are talkin about would be a lot of work. You would have to eat also. Would you do your own cooking? That would mean some shopping...is there some reason why you cant keep living with your parents? Being on your own is a time that comes way too fast anyway.
At school I get free breakfast and lunch so that would certainly help. And I plan on learning to cook but I don't really eat much haha. I think I'm unhealthily skinny so I would mostly have to worry about eating on weekends and holidays which cheap ramen will be useful.

As for why I want to move out, it's not like they beat me or anything. They both have short tempers but it's not anything I can't avoid. I guess its just I STRONGLY crave independence and living closer to my school would also be a plus since after my freshman year we moved pretty far from the school.
 
Old 10-07-2015, 05:26 PM
 
13 posts, read 14,421 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeerkatMama View Post
If you want, I'll give you an example of my fall semester schedule:

6A Wake up and get ready for school
7:30A-11:30A School time
11:30A-12:00P Lunch
12:00-6:30P Work
7P-10P (Briefly worked a second job, because it was from the summer months, but I eventually quit to focus on school. Otherwise, this time was for studying).
11P Bed

On the weekends, I worked Saturday morning at the bank and had another job for Friday, Saturday, and Sunday evening hours.

I was blessed that at my bank, they didn't have any problem with me working on my school work when customers weren't bustling in during busy hours. I'd also work on homework at my other jobs when I'd have a break. In another words, I fit school work in wherever I could and I made it work.

Once in awhile, I ate something. I'm kidding. I did have time to go to friend's houses and do things typical teenagers do. It wasn't all work and no play.

When I was in the local community college, my schedule was basically the same. I did start off taking a night class after leaving work at 6PM, but I quickly realized I couldn't do it. I started the semester off hopeful of doing 17 credit hours, but when I dropped that night class, I was down to 12 credit hours. It was still a full semester, but my point is to recognize your limitations and stick with what works, not what you wish worked.

I just noticed you said you'd only work 30 hours a week. Can I be honest? That's not going to work. You'll never make it. If you want to make it, trust me, you'll need to work full-time or more. It can be done, but again, I emphasize only if you're wise and make intelligent decisions with your time.

Consider that the average minimum wage job is $7.50. Uncle Sam is going to take roughly 20% of that, so you're left with $6 per hour. At 30 hours per week, your net pay is only going to be $180/week or roughly $720/month (slightly more, but I'm using four weeks).

-Rent (no more than 1/3 your income) - $240/mo (at that cost, it'd have to be a room and could only be more if utilities were included)
-Utilities (no more than 1/4 your income) - $180
-Car repair, insurance, and gas (you'll have to buy one with cash, because a payment here won't work) - $200/month is a conservative number in my estimate

This leaves you with $100 for food and supplies.

Savings? Scare to be found with only 30 hours per week. Based on my four-week model above, you might get the two "freebie" paychecks per year if you're paid bi-weekly, but that's only a $360/year savings. Uncle Sam might be so kind as to return a few hundred dollars of your money, too, I suppose.

Emergency? You'll probably need to call Mom and Dad for help.

I didn't even factor in mandated health insurance, but at that pay, you won't need to pay a fine come tax time. You just need to hope you don't need medical personnel to pay for unexpected medical bills if you can't afford it. Maybe you'd still be on your parents plan?

If your family is willing to supplement, then 30 hours per week would be feasible, but if you're wanting to do this entirely on your own, 30 hours per week is just not realistic. I worked about 50-60 hours per week and went to school full-time that spring semester, but believe me, I was busy and exhausted by the end of it. It can be done, but mentally prepare yourself for that.

There's a lot to consider, which is why your parents are probably not supporting this, because they know it's difficult. Personally, if my kids want to do it, I'll let them. However, I'm going to strongly encourage them not to do it and just stay home, help around the house, and save the money they'd otherwise give someone else, so that they can someday put that money towards something better (e.g. down payment on a house or buying a house in cash). Lots to consider, young one.
Thanks! This post was extremely helpful. You're right, I should plan on working more than 30. However, idk if its cheaper than a car but I plan on getting a bus pas instead since my work and school aren't too far away and I can walk or skate/bike to other places.

And I'm not yet 18 but will be in February
 
Old 10-07-2015, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Kansas
19,187 posts, read 14,966,734 times
Reputation: 18249
I think the plan probably sounds better than it will be in reality. First, you'll have to find the job and if will have to pay enough. A lot of jobs, especially part-time, cut back hours at a moment's notice so you won't have a guaranteed income so you'll have to allow for that. I doubt your parents will be wanting to loan you money since they are really not supporting this.

Have you sat down and made out a budget and included all of the expenses that you will have? Have you considered in that budget that your parents may be covering expenses now that they will not be willing to cover if you move out?

If you were my child, I would not want you to do this. Are you planning to become emancipated (How Do You Get Emancipated? - FindLaw) from your parents?

Basically, you'll either be in school, working or sleeping. You'll probably have friends wanting to hang out at your place which will be a problem since you will need to be really focused to pull this off. I am hoping there is not a significate other involved here since graduating should be your only priority at this point and it will hard enough if you are living on your own.

It isn't that long yet before you can graduate and be on your own. You'll have many years ahead to be out of the house with parents with short tempers. I don't suppose though that you contribute to those short tempers?
 
Old 10-07-2015, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,938 posts, read 17,236,141 times
Reputation: 40950
There are often so many unexpected expenses when you first live on your own.

In addition, if you get sick many entry level jobs do not have sick days. I remember when my husband was in college and had a bad case of the flu. He missed an entire week of classes AND an entire week of his part time job, plus he had extra expenses due to going to the doctor and buying over the counter medicine like aspirin. We were so short of money that we couldn't even buy groceries and needed to mainly eat potatoes (all that we had in our pantry) for two weeks until I got paid from my job.

I would suggest just to tough it out at home until you graduate from high school. You can work and save as much as you can so that you will have a cushion when you do move out.
 
Old 10-08-2015, 10:40 AM
 
13 posts, read 14,421 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnywhereElse View Post
I think the plan probably sounds better than it will be in reality. First, you'll have to find the job and if will have to pay enough. A lot of jobs, especially part-time, cut back hours at a moment's notice so you won't have a guaranteed income so you'll have to allow for that. I doubt your parents will be wanting to loan you money since they are really not supporting this.

Have you sat down and made out a budget and included all of the expenses that you will have? Have you considered in that budget that your parents may be covering expenses now that they will not be willing to cover if you move out?

If you were my child, I would not want you to do this. Are you planning to become emancipated (How Do You Get Emancipated? - FindLaw) from your parents?

Basically, you'll either be in school, working or sleeping. You'll probably have friends wanting to hang out at your place which will be a problem since you will need to be really focused to pull this off. I am hoping there is not a significate other involved here since graduating should be your only priority at this point and it will hard enough if you are living on your own.

It isn't that long yet before you can graduate and be on your own. You'll have many years ahead to be out of the house with parents with short tempers. I don't suppose though that you contribute to those short tempers?
I guess you're right so I think my best bet would be asking my Aunt if I can live with her and help with the bills since she lives really close to the school. I'm going to try tutoring on the side since it makes more than minimum and I'm pretty good at math.

And I'll admit I might contribute to my dad's temper occasionally but my mom gets mad at anyone for any small thing. However, it's not a huge problem where I HAVE to move out.
 
Old 10-08-2015, 10:43 AM
 
13 posts, read 14,421 times
Reputation: 13
So right now I think I'm going to ask my Aunt since her house is paid off and has extra rooms close to the school. I could help with the bills and all but idk how she'll feel about it if my parents aren't on board. What do you guys think?
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