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Old 09-10-2016, 05:27 PM
 
473 posts, read 324,190 times
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Uhaul website has nice feature that allows you to hire movers to load/unload on your move which is handy. But have been running into more and more scammers around my own state. Am to the point myself of just moving with blow up mattress for a while to test-drive location alone and female as even some of the small communities around here will scam and screw city women who try to leave unless she is desirable to use. Then could be ruined to put with the methies and cops get her called nuts to use her welfare....Ladies have been telling me they only move with a relationship now as can be very harry if you are lower-middle class as the crazy bum predators have been targeting the women who can get by to use their housing. Definitely recommend you have some contact where you are moving, good to be near a brother and nieces.

I had very nice results with just purchasing a Sears mattress at the local small town Sears and have it delivered to place. Then stopped at local used furniture recycler present in almost all small towns. I usually buy multiple pieces of recycled stuff, always in nice shape in small towns, and ask the owner to deliver please sometimes for a fee. All these business owners own a truck. I've been really pleased with quality of the used furniture offerings but sometimes the upholstered stuff is a bit retro.

Have been showing up with blowup mattress and little pump, fold up mini-table that serves as desk and dining and folding camping chair. Can understand is not that comfortable if overweight, arthritis or some mobility problems but it works after moving to a couple VERY appealing looking smaller communities and the locals are running predator scams or neighbor is out of control. Even moved for a job at a church and got worked over too bad to gamble any more with the place...Lots of people just have something wrong with them and small town police included.

May not be what you want to hear...The retired set is being treated better than 40s-50s females. Things are a predater hunt even at formerly professional employment and no professional graces such as respect of unemployment pay for skilled labor you hired.

After moving around about 5 times+ in last 4 years and going into contract to buy 5 places, the belongings are nothing more than a burden. Better to jetison some junk. Maybe even an estate sale coordinator would be good if you have a lot of collectibles. Could be as easy as pack up your momentos, pictures and clothing/shoes in current size. But since you are planning to move a couple pieces of furniture for a relative may consider taking kitchen stuff and a bit more of expensive contents.

Last edited by cattalk1; 09-10-2016 at 05:37 PM..
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Old 09-13-2016, 09:31 AM
 
55 posts, read 32,197 times
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We just completed a retirement move from Kansas City to the Albuquerque area and hung onto way more stuff than we should have. When you move there are 2 scenarios. First being, you have already purchased a new home and know exactly what you need to fill it- makes the keep or pitch decisions simple. The second being, outside of picking a zip code you don't have a clue what your new address will be. We chose the latter because of the cost of multiple trips back and forth dealing with a realtor. We bought a travel trailer, sold our house, put everything in pods and said goodbye to the Midwest. From the time we arrived until we found a home and closed was just under 2 months. After garage sales and dumping a lot of stuff on our kids we filled 2 16' pods with the "bare necessities". None of our furniture fits or matches the style of home we picked. We have a formal dining room set with china cabinet but no formal dining room. Our old home had 3 living areas, we now have one. Getting rid of the absolute junk is not the same as downsizing or seriously thinning out your possessions. If we had sold all of our furniture and really thinned out the "can't do without" c--p we could have fit everything into 1 pod saving around $3500.00. You can then go buy a lot of new "can't do without" c--p but at least it will match and you won't have to move it for a while.
Here's some basic rules when you plan a move.
1. If you haven't used it in a year- sell, donate or dump it on your neighbor.
2. If it has sentimental value- see #1 or better yet, give it to your kids- they'll get it eventually anyway.
3. If you look at something and think "surely I can find a place to stick it"- see #1
4. If you can decorate (complete with dishes, dish towels, pictures on the walls and bedspread) for all 4 seasons plus holidays- see #1 and possibly see a doctor.
5. If you currently have a large garage plus a storage room or attic- see #1 or bring in a dumpster.
6. Start the thinning process early and repeat often. Loosing your prized possessions a little at a time reduces the trauma.

Hope this has helped. When you think you have reduced your household as much as you can, repeat the entire process again. BTW Pods is the way to go when changing climates.
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Old 09-13-2016, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,843 posts, read 25,246,623 times
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Amen! They say when you pack for a trip you should assemble everything you need then get rid of half of it. Same thing for a move! Especially if you are retiring. Get rid of all the STUFF!
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Old 09-13-2016, 10:02 AM
 
4,372 posts, read 5,568,669 times
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Vinyl records can be worth money, depending on what they are and their condition. When my husband and I moved, we took a lot of records (about half our collection) to a used record store. We got money for about half of those, and donated the rest. We later gave a few away to friends who were into vinyl. I moved the rest 6 years later. Still have them.

In general, I think the suggestions of others on this thread are good. When we moved after 23 years in one place, we started thinning out a year ahead of the move. It takes lots of energy, both mental and physical, and sometimes things are best done gradually. This last move I had to do by myself (widowed) so it was much harder. I had to rely on friends to help me pack, and they just put everything in boxes. I didn't get much of a chance to clean out, so I probably moved too much. But I survived. Got rid of a few pieces of furniture that didn't fit after I got here.
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Old 09-15-2016, 12:11 AM
 
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If you have nice oak bookshelves, I would take them, assuming you still have the books to put onto them. Good quality shelves are really expensive, and the not so good quality, like Ikea, and pressboard, and really awful, unreliable, etc. In general, solid wood furniture is hard to find now, and although I'm not adverse to downsizing, think twice about anything that is solid, sturdy and functional, as long as it is something you would use.
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Old 09-15-2016, 11:44 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,490 posts, read 17,665,423 times
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I have been considering this question, and since if I were to move it would both be across country and a significant (maybe even extreme) downsize, I would sell or donate everything without a significant sentimental backstory.

If I can't tell a visitor a nice little story about a posession, it doesn't come with me.

Obviously, certain very utilitarian posessions that don't take up much space, like expensive kitchen implements, are exempted from this rule, but it definitely applies to furniture, books, much of my wardrobe, etc.
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Old 09-16-2016, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,822 posts, read 23,763,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G Grasshopper View Post
If you have nice oak bookshelves, I would take them, assuming you still have the books to put onto them. Good quality shelves are really expensive, and the not so good quality, like Ikea, and pressboard, and really awful, unreliable, etc. In general, solid wood furniture is hard to find now, and although I'm not adverse to downsizing, think twice about anything that is solid, sturdy and functional, as long as it is something you would use.
Old Ikea from Europe in the 1980s was very solid. I still have a couple of those bookcases. All wood is better, though.
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Old 09-16-2016, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,822 posts, read 23,763,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I have been considering this question, and since if I were to move it would both be across country and a significant (maybe even extreme) downsize, I would sell or donate everything without a significant sentimental backstory.

If I can't tell a visitor a nice little story about a posession, it doesn't come with me.

Obviously, certain very utilitarian posessions that don't take up much space, like expensive kitchen implements, are exempted from this rule, but it definitely applies to furniture, books, much of my wardrobe, etc.
I've gotten rid of over 1,000 books in the last three years. Yeah, it hurt, but there there is no alternative. Most of my album collection will be gone soon, too. That hurts more.

Long, long story, but when I was 14, my future husband--many years later--visited me when I was in the hospital, and bought an album for me. He'd wrapped it. Doesn't get much better than that.

Rip and tear. It seems the thing to do these days.
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Old 09-17-2016, 07:56 AM
 
2,660 posts, read 1,522,999 times
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We recently retired and "downsized". Actually, we moved from dense urban DC with a cramped 1600 sq foot house to one much bigger in NH. We still got rid of many carloads of stuff.

We knew the house we were moving into, so had a good idea of what would fit (just about all the bigger pieces) so we did not get rid of much bigger stuff.

Knowing movers charge by the pound, and how much, it was easy mentally to calculate the cost vs value of moving many things, so much old heavy stuff was dumped.

We also used the rule that, if we had not touched something for a year or two (or more!), it was dumped.

Mattresses? Unless you love them or they are very new, dump.

Leather furniture is an interesting issue, since it is quite expensive to replace with quality, so think twice about dumping it.
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Old 09-17-2016, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Central Florida
2,063 posts, read 1,858,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by volosong View Post
I'm in the process of downsizing in preparation for retirement in this upcoming March, at which time I will be moving about 1,200 miles from where I currently live. It's time consuming and tough sorting through all the little stuff. What I'm asking about is what furniture is worth the expense of moving, (I'll be self-moving, not using a commercial mover).

For sure, I'm taking the piano and oak bedroom set. I guess I could leave the bedroom set. It's not the highest quality, but certainly functional. My grandma's coffee table and dresser will be given to one of my nieces, so I'll have to lug that along until I can drop them off at my brother's house. I'll just leave the refrigerator and washer/dryer for the new owners.

Do I take the leather recliner and sofa? Or donate them and replace once I get re-established? How about my mom's oak dinning room table? There is no sentimental value, but pretty solid for what it is. I wouldn't be sad about getting rid of it. There is a curio cabinet and a couple of pretty good oak bookshelves that I'm undecided about. The bookshelves are pretty high quality furniture and the curio cabinet was my daughter's until I 'inherited' it. Only other big thing do decide upon is the universal gym. It's huge and heavy. Will take most of a whole day to disassemble it.

Any thoughts? Those of you who have retired and moved to another city, what did you do?

Thanks.


.

I would say dump as much as you can and keep only what you truly value the most. Consider the size of the home you will be moving to and the cost to transport your belongings there. I use this rule of thumb if you have a doubt about whether you still want it or not best consider being rid of it because small doubts now can become larger doubts and regrets later on.
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