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Old 07-12-2016, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
1 posts, read 666 times
Reputation: 10

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I'll be relocating across country as soon as I get a job. But I'm confused on how to go about it, step by step. First is to get a job. Then, I'll get an apartment ready (I've already been researching and have a couple places in mind).

I'll be moving by myself and without a car. I can get my apartment locked in before I go, but how do I get furniture and everything in it? Can I arrange to have some things sent there and meet the movers at a certain time when I get there? I'll be flying to the new place.

Also, I'll be buying a new car with my job, so I guess I will have to rent one in the meantime. I'll be buying it within the first month or two or living there. I know car rental places have deals for long term rentals. Is a rental car the right way to go? (I'll live nearby my work, and it's not in a city, so I can't use public transportation).

So as for the timeline of how I should go about moving...
1- Get a job
2- Get an apartment
3- Have belongings sent to apartment, and set up a time to meet the movers
4- Rent a car for a month or two, which I'll pick up at the airport upon arrival in the new city

Does that seem like the right way to go?

Thanks in advance
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Old 07-12-2016, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
5,055 posts, read 6,022,820 times
Reputation: 9437
Yes, you're on the right track. Try to eliminate as much of your stuff as you can. Do a cost-benefit analysis. That is, if you have furniture that you bought second-hand or on the cheap for $600 and it will cost $1,100 to move it, let it go. You might sell it on Craig's List or donate it to Sally Army (they pick up!).

The same with books and other things. Obviously, don't get rid of your treasures but see what you can let go to make the move as easy as possible.

I've known a few college graduates who moved across the country with 2 - 3 suitcases and several boxes of books and household items.
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Old 07-13-2016, 02:17 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,038 posts, read 23,933,408 times
Reputation: 30927
You can ship things to your new address. Use USPS Media Mail for books as an example. I've never done it, so I have no other advise. https://about.usps.com/notices/not121/not121_tech.htm

As Meemur said, get rid of everything you can. Don't pay to move inexpensive things or items which can be cheaply replaced.

Start shopping for a mover now. It can be a time consuming and difficult process.
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Old 07-13-2016, 05:25 PM
 
1,995 posts, read 1,349,838 times
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Do you have several months of expenses or more saved up?

As for transportation, anything you rent is going to be quite a bit. How far are you from a city and or how far are you planning on being from work? Renting a car is going to get expensive; car rental, + mileage, taxes, and insurance even for the cheapest rental car, I would think you're going to be spending $25-$30 a day, and that's about a weekly rate. I'm not sure about long term/monthly rentals. Will the distance, weather and your location allow for just using a bicycle until you can get a car? Or would you have enough to buy a cheap running beater for a little while to save up?

Are you going to a REAL SMALL town or something?? If the place has an apt locator service, start there, it should be a very minimal cost (I paid $10) and they will give you a list of what's available, what has what you are looking for, and who will take you without having several months of income to prove.

Depending on what you have, Id recommend USHIP.com for all your belongings you are having sent with you. Its best if boxed up, or strapped on a pallet. They will pick it up and drop it off door to door, (like a help wanted craigslist ad for truck drivers with extra room).

If you are just going to get furniture there, Do you plan on going cheap? As in you can go and rent a pickup or uhaul for a day, drive to the city, and search a few goodwills to find stuff to get you by for a while. Any place that sells furniture new will probably be able to deliver it.
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Old 07-13-2016, 06:06 PM
 
12,004 posts, read 5,126,293 times
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I'm curious about how much time there is inbetween getting a job and everything else. Most employers want you to start ASAP or at least within a week or two. How do you get an apt and move across country and everything else once you have a job at the new location within one or two weeks? It seems nearly impossible unless you have a spouse that can stay behind, get everything in order while you start the new job. I'm just curious about this.
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Old 07-14-2016, 09:25 AM
 
74 posts, read 55,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I'm curious about how much time there is inbetween getting a job and everything else. Most employers want you to start ASAP or at least within a week or two. How do you get an apt and move across country and everything else once you have a job at the new location within one or two weeks? It seems nearly impossible unless you have a spouse that can stay behind, get everything in order while you start the new job. I'm just curious about this.


I can relate because currently I'm on a month-to-month lease because I'm eager to relocate. However, my current apartment complex requires a thirty day notice and most jobs want you to start within a two week time frame.
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Old 07-14-2016, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
5,055 posts, read 6,022,820 times
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Re: giving notice vs. starting a job --

Sometimes, you have to just take into account your goals. If you've taken a job in another city that has a higher salary than you're making now, you might have to go live in an extended living hotel so you can start the new job and find a place to live on the weekends. That's something to keep in mind when you are interviewing for your new job: ask about relocation assistance. Some places have none, whereas others will at least help you out with a few bucks towards hotel bills.

Also, you may have to pay double rent (old and new place) for a month or two, depending on how your lease is written.

Unfair? Yes, but that's life. These are things you need to keep in mind when you seek a new job. If the salary is high enough, you can afford to lose some money here and there. If it's not, then you may need to re-think why you're taking a job that requires moving. In some cases, it's not the right thing to do.
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Old 07-14-2016, 03:32 PM
 
12,004 posts, read 5,126,293 times
Reputation: 18769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meemur View Post
Re: giving notice vs. starting a job --

Sometimes, you have to just take into account your goals. If you've taken a job in another city that has a higher salary than you're making now, you might have to go live in an extended living hotel so you can start the new job and find a place to live on the weekends. That's something to keep in mind when you are interviewing for your new job: ask about relocation assistance. Some places have none, whereas others will at least help you out with a few bucks towards hotel bills.

Also, you may have to pay double rent (old and new place) for a month or two, depending on how your lease is written.

Unfair? Yes, but that's life. These are things you need to keep in mind when you seek a new job. If the salary is high enough, you can afford to lose some money here and there. If it's not, then you may need to re-think why you're taking a job that requires moving. In some cases, it's not the right thing to do.
This sounds logical but how do you address everything else involved in moving across country when you're not at your original residence because you had to start a new job 2000 miles away?
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Old 07-14-2016, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
5,055 posts, read 6,022,820 times
Reputation: 9437
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
This sounds logical but how do you address everything else involved in moving across country when you're not at your original residence because you had to start a new job 2000 miles away?
Added: Since you are already in the new city, make that list, make a calendar, and you'll probably have to go back to get your stuff, maybe a long weekend? In any case, a list is your friend! (See below)

1. Find out what, if any, relocation assistance the new employer will give you. Use it.

2. Make a list of everything that needs to be done (notify landlord, shut off utilities, change address, put couch on Craig's list, etc.)

3. Write down the start date of the new job so you don't forget

4. Get a calendar -- start setting deadlines and making a schedule for the items on the list (example: on Nov. 10, cancel internet, phone Sally Army to get the couch and chairs, sell unneeded books at One-Half Price Bookstore. On Nov. 11, clean out the kitchen and donate what's not going to Goodwill . . . and so on. Try to be realistic.)

** set priorities. Remember that some things like shutting off the utilities could be done on the phone from your extended stay hotel in the new city. The first priorities should be things that you need to do at your old place, such as sorting and getting rid of stuff.


5. Each day, work hard at completing the list for that day. You may need to take a few hours off from your current job. You may also need to hire some help, like a mover to help you haul furniture to the curb or dump.

Also, less is more. If you are working alone, do a cost-benefit analysis on your stuff. In some cases, it will be cheaper to let nearly everything go and move with a minimum of things.

Yes, it is a lot of work to move, and even more if you do it alone and are a pack rat. I'll spare everyone the lecture, except . . . which is more important? Staying where you are with your stuff or going to the new job? Let it go and move on with your life. (/sermon)

If you have solid wooden furniture from Aunt Dee-Dee that you just can't part with, hire someone like Two Men and a Truck and haul it to storage for now. Or put it in a POD. Deal with it later, like 2 - 3 months after you've been at your new job.

This, in a nutshell, is how to do it. If you have a partner, great. If not, pace yourself, refer to your list, work hard, and MOVE. (-:

PM me if you need help either brainstorming the list or putting together the calendar. Or, ask here and we'll all help you.

Last edited by Meemur; 07-14-2016 at 04:33 PM..
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Old 07-14-2016, 11:06 PM
 
Location: WA
878 posts, read 470,375 times
Reputation: 2691
As always you have to use your common sense on Craigslist and back off at any sign of shadiness. That is where I'd recommended looking at a short term sublease of 1-3 months.

Most of the time the people who are subleasing it to you do not care if you don't have a job, as long as you look semi-respectable and have the rent check in hand since you are probably helping them out.

1-3 months is a good time window to get to know the area, secure a job, and figure out where your next lease is going to be.
Most corporate run apartments are going to require a 6 month or year lease.

Once you're making a decent income you can start settling in a little more. I done this type of move, where I drive off not knowing where I'll land, several times. It can be a little stressful without a cushion of at least 3 months of living expenses. You don't want to be forced to working at a mind-numbing, unfulfilling job for very long, which can happen if you have to take any job that comes up.
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