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Old 06-12-2017, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Bremerton, WA
44 posts, read 29,635 times
Reputation: 57

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Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
Re tolls,
EZpass is valid from NY to Illinois. Once past Illinois, there are no tolls via I-90 and/or I-94

E-ZPass Group - About E-ZPass

https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Madi...47.6062095!3e0


Oh, that makes things easier than expected. Thank you!
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Old 06-12-2017, 11:16 AM
 
10,366 posts, read 8,363,565 times
Reputation: 19114
It's not "cruel" to travel with a toddler - people have been doing this for centuries. Just take into account your little one's abilities and limits, and plan accordingly.

Starting early in the morning is a great idea, but look for amusements that don't include the tablet and do include some active parenting, at least some of the time. There's far too much screen time in far too many toddlers' little lives these days, anyway. They are lonely and isolating and do little for socialization, creativity, and effective communication and speech development.

Sing (and/or play) Mother Goose songs to him and encourage him to sing along. "London Bridge", "The Farmer in the Dell", etc. Tell him simple nursery stories and be dramatic: "Goldilocks and the Three Bears", etc. Provide board books and small stuffed toys. Toy cars are great, too, since you're going to be on the road - just no metal or plastic with hard edges.

Juice boxes and crackers and bananas - it's going to be messy, no way around that, so dress him in comfortable, loose, washable clothes with changes on hand and add big bibs. Of course you'll have paper towels and handi-wipes along for quick clean-ups, too. Plenty of water will keep him (and you) hydrated and happier.

Talk about what's outside the window: "Oh, look, a brown cow!! Wow, there's an airplane! Look at all the trees! My goodness, there are lots of cars, aren't there? Now you tell me what YOU see!"

Give him a small notepad - the paper kind - and two or three crayons (one at a time) and let him scribble. Avoid proximity to the board books during this activity. Provide a little boy doll or a little stuffed animal - small sized - and talk about what Little Boy Doll or Little Doggy or whoever is doing on HIS trip. If you can find an old-fashioned Magic Slate with the pencil attached, go for it. If you don't remember Magic Slates, ask Grandma or Granddad.

Don't feel as if you have to hand him something to entertain him constantly - space the "surprises" out. If he has a favorite stuffed toy, include it nearby - ditto a favorite pillow or security blanket. Talk to him ahead of time about taking a long car trip, and what you'll be doing. Act out going for a long ride with his toy cars ahead of time, too.

Frequent potty and run-around stops will help. Bring along a medium-sized ball to roll or toss back and forth on breaks. Even if you can't locate a playground, stop somewhere safe and go for a short walk, again talking about and pointing out what's around you. Encourage him to hop, skip, and jump while you're outside. Then try it on one foot.

Just don't do what my usually far more practical parents did, way back around 1948. I got restless on a long car trip, so they stopped at a dime store (this was back in the day) - and bought me a toy drum.

Oops.
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Old 06-12-2017, 11:30 AM
 
989 posts, read 1,497,605 times
Reputation: 928
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyonpa View Post
Your EZPass should get you thru all the tolls,

(Depending on your route, Maybe Illinois, might be a plaza, or Log on to there website and pay within 7 days)

But IL website say they take EZpass on

Illinois State Toll Highway (Tollway) Authority https://www.illinoistollway.com/
Chicago Skyway http://www.chicagoskyway.org/

For the kid,

Make stop let him out and run around, Look for some schools/parks along your route so he can get off the Hiway and run off some energy.

Snacks (Lots) (No Sugar) try to get one that are not to messy.

Try to Start your Day Real EARLY (like 3am Early, fill car with gas night before so you start off full) so he spend first few hours sleeping, Have everything packed up and ready to go night before. So at 3-4am you guys get up load the car and go, round 7-8am when he wakes up then take your break have breakfast, next few hours he will be entertained by his tablet. 10am stop for gas, find somewhere for him to run around. noon-1pm Stop for Lunch, 2-4pm let him nap, the 4p-6pm plan on getting to the hotel (Don't forget to fill the tank) , Dinner (easy on the caffeine soda/coffee), 7-8pm everyone off to Bed.
Great idea...adjust for his schedule and you'll help yourself a bunch too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
Also, avoid Chicago by skirting to the west via I-355, and re-join I-90 NW of Chicago
Do not use the Skyway/I-90 ; or I-94, they take you into downtown Chicago.
Avoid the Tri-State Tollway / I-294. It gets very congested on a good day.

See map here:
https://goo.gl/maps/8cj2gB68kFJ2
Yes, please avoid Chicago...it would make what might be an uncomfortable trip miserable for both of you. You hardly need to be trying to navigate Chicago gridlock with a cranky one that has really nothing to look at...

Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
It's not "cruel" to travel with a toddler - people have been doing this for centuries. Just take into account your little one's abilities and limits, and plan accordingly.

Starting early in the morning is a great idea, but look for amusements that don't include the tablet and do include some active parenting, at least some of the time. There's far too much screen time in far too many toddlers' little lives these days, anyway. They are lonely and isolating and do little for socialization, creativity, and effective communication and speech development.

Sing (and/or play) Mother Goose songs to him and encourage him to sing along. "London Bridge", "The Farmer in the Dell", etc. Tell him simple nursery stories and be dramatic: "Goldilocks and the Three Bears", etc. Provide board books and small stuffed toys. Toy cars are great, too, since you're going to be on the road - just no metal or plastic with hard edges. Juice boxes and crackers and bananas - it's going to be messy, no way around that, so dress him in comfortable, loose, washable clothes and add big bibs. Of course you'll have paper towels and handi-wipes along for quick clean-ups, too. Plenty of water will keep him (and you) hydrated and happier.

Talk about what's outside the window: "Oh, look, a brown cow!! Wow, there's an airplane! Look at all the trees! My goodness, there are lots of cars, aren't there? Now you tell me what YOU see!"

Give him a small notepad - the paper kind - and two or three crayons (one at a time) and let him scribble. Avoid proximity to the board books during this activity. Provide a little boy doll or a little stuffed animal - small sized - and talk about what Little Boy Doll or Little Doggy or whoever is doing on HIS trip. If you can find an old-fashioned Magic Slate with the pencil attached, go for it. If you don't remember Magic Slates, ask Grandma or Granddad.

Don't feel as if you have to hand him something constantly - space the "surprises" out. If he has a favorite stuffed toy, include it nearby - ditto a favorite pillow or security blanket. Talk to him ahead of time about taking a long car trip, and what you'll be doing. Act out going for a long ride with his toy cars ahead of time, too.

Frequent potty and run-around stops will help. Bring along a medium-sized ball to roll or toss back and forth on breaks. Even if you can't locate a playground, stop somewhere safe and go for a short walk, again talking about and pointing out what's around you. Encourage him to hop, skip, and jump while you're outside. Then try it on one foot.

Just don't do what my usually far more practical parents did, way back around 1948. I got restless on a long car trip, so they stopped at a dime store (this was back in the day) - and bought me a toy drum.

Oops.
I agree, it's not going to be cruel...unpleasant perhaps, but not cruel. Honestly, it'll probably be harder on you than him in the long run. He'll forget his unhappiness in a day, probably longer for you...

The tablet and ideas suggested above all seem like great ones. The tablet is good, but non-tablet ideas are good too...(especially if the battery runs out, right?)
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Old 06-12-2017, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Bremerton, WA
44 posts, read 29,635 times
Reputation: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
It's not "cruel" to travel with a toddler - people have been doing this for centuries. Just take into account your little one's abilities and limits, and plan accordingly.

Starting early in the morning is a great idea, but look for amusements that don't include the tablet and do include some active parenting, at least some of the time. There's far too much screen time in far too many toddlers' little lives these days, anyway. They are lonely and isolating and do little for socialization, creativity, and effective communication and speech development.

Sing (and/or play) Mother Goose songs to him and encourage him to sing along. "London Bridge", "The Farmer in the Dell", etc. Tell him simple nursery stories and be dramatic: "Goldilocks and the Three Bears", etc. Provide board books and small stuffed toys. Toy cars are great, too, since you're going to be on the road - just no metal or plastic with hard edges.

Juice boxes and crackers and bananas - it's going to be messy, no way around that, so dress him in comfortable, loose, washable clothes with changes on hand and add big bibs. Of course you'll have paper towels and handi-wipes along for quick clean-ups, too. Plenty of water will keep him (and you) hydrated and happier.

Talk about what's outside the window: "Oh, look, a brown cow!! Wow, there's an airplane! Look at all the trees! My goodness, there are lots of cars, aren't there? Now you tell me what YOU see!"

Give him a small notepad - the paper kind - and two or three crayons (one at a time) and let him scribble. Avoid proximity to the board books during this activity. Provide a little boy doll or a little stuffed animal - small sized - and talk about what Little Boy Doll or Little Doggy or whoever is doing on HIS trip. If you can find an old-fashioned Magic Slate with the pencil attached, go for it. If you don't remember Magic Slates, ask Grandma or Granddad.

Don't feel as if you have to hand him something to entertain him constantly - space the "surprises" out. If he has a favorite stuffed toy, include it nearby - ditto a favorite pillow or security blanket. Talk to him ahead of time about taking a long car trip, and what you'll be doing. Act out going for a long ride with his toy cars ahead of time, too.

Frequent potty and run-around stops will help. Bring along a medium-sized ball to roll or toss back and forth on breaks. Even if you can't locate a playground, stop somewhere safe and go for a short walk, again talking about and pointing out what's around you. Encourage him to hop, skip, and jump while you're outside. Then try it on one foot.

Just don't do what my usually far more practical parents did, way back around 1948. I got restless on a long car trip, so they stopped at a dime store (this was back in the day) - and bought me a toy drum.

Oops.
Thank you for the not cruel comment!!! Definitely agree with limiting screen time, he's not usually allowed to use the tablet so it'll be an exciting special treat. Love the idea of singing songs with him along the way as well as your other ideas! Hahahaha, absolutely no drums!!!
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Old 06-12-2017, 01:00 PM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
9,110 posts, read 17,054,828 times
Reputation: 9959
If you can afford it, can you get a 2nd Driver or Passenger and then fly them back.

It would allow the Driver to do just that drive and not get distracted by the kid, the 2nd Driver/Passenger can tend to the kid?
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Old 06-12-2017, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Bremerton, WA
44 posts, read 29,635 times
Reputation: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyonpa View Post
If you can afford it, can you get a 2nd Driver or Passenger and then fly them back.

It would allow the Driver to do just that drive and not get distracted by the kid, the 2nd Driver/Passenger can tend to the kid?


Unfortunately I don't have anyone else who would/could go with me.
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Old 06-12-2017, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,751 posts, read 23,712,888 times
Reputation: 30464
Do you have any toddler music, or is there anything your child particularly likes? Singing or listening to pleasant songs always bought me some time. Good kiddie big people songs were things like Wouldn't it Be Nice and Here Comes the Sun. They're not too fast, pleasant, and have a short refrain.

Keep a bag of small toys within reach. You can grab one without looking and hand it back after a quick glance. "Look honey, it's your favorite book!" Buy a few new things for the trip. Every child needs a microphone for New York, New York. I did the same thing with snacks. I put them in easy open containers or small bags.

Bubbles. If you have to stop when your child is drowsy, but you know they need to run around for a while, blow bubbles. It gets them going just about every time.
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Old 06-13-2017, 04:43 AM
 
619 posts, read 362,635 times
Reputation: 1636
When my son was younger (back in the days that dinosaurs roamed the earth) and I had to keep him quiet/ distracted, I got him books that did stuff - like those cloth books that you can squeeze and unbutton etc, or cardboard books with Windows that open, etc.

I would make sure to bring things for your park breaks - soft balls, frisbee, etc to be sure he'll stay active.

Get some soft mesh baskets or bags fir the different items (car toys in one, break toys in a second, pjs and stuffed animals for hotel in a third, and so on).

I don't know if this is something you would consider, but I would look around for a hs or college student on vacation who might want to come along for the trip And help you. You would have to pay them something plus airfare back home but it may be worth it.
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Old 06-13-2017, 07:37 AM
 
2,685 posts, read 4,383,342 times
Reputation: 1926
Quote:
Originally Posted by bb2315 View Post
Now THIS is helpful!!! Totally didn't think of the getting up early but I think that will be extremely beneficial along with that entire schedule. Some serious gold stars for you! Thank you so much!
If it were me, I'd also leave early. In addition:

1) Find hotels, motels, camp sites that have a pool and go for a swim when you get your room for the night (assume it will be 3PM, if you start at 3AM).
2) Eat as many meals in the car as you can. Maybe start in the restaurant (for say the burger) and then head to car to finish up the fries sort of thing
3) Find parks or even bouncy house places where your kid can play once or even twice/ day
4) Burn CDs full of nursery rhymes and kid songs
5) Even if your car is tinted, get those window shade things, or your kid will wake up with the sun at 6AM.
6) Get/ trade in kids books at places like Goodwill.
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Old 06-13-2017, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
3,842 posts, read 2,998,640 times
Reputation: 2557
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
Re tolls,
EZpass is valid from NY to Illinois. Once past Illinois, there are no tolls via I-90 and/or I-94

E-ZPass Group - About E-ZPass

https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Madi...47.6062095!3e0

Indeed, I drove from CT to Chicago and later Milwaukee and my EZ pass worked in all states. I have an EZ pass from NY since CT doesn't have tolls.

Also, if you sign up for EZ pass from NY choose to receive your monthly/quarterly statements via email and you will avoid the 1$ service charge.
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