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Old 09-11-2017, 03:33 PM
 
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Yes, I'm looking for utopia and well aware it does not exist. From my research, San Diego comes up on the list for being temperate year round. Although on a recent visit, my friend had to turn the a/c on. She said this wasn't typical San Diego. It was also very muggy.

Are there any other cities I'm missing in my research with a temperate climate? How about cities that don't require A/C? (Heat is ok).
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Old 09-11-2017, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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Most of the high desert areas like around Idaho Falls, or around Denver, I got along fine without A/C. Even after a hot day, where I would wear just a T shirt, when the sun set, it would get at least cool. I had a house in Johnstown, CO, I put in an attic exhaust fan. Summer evenings I would open windows and run that fan for a few hours. If it was going to be hot the next day, I would maybe run that fan all night, to the extreme of running an electric blanket in my bed. But next day I would have people ask if I had central air in the shack, it was that cool.

Heat, though, yeah, I needed heat and a good bit of it, both places. Anymore gas is so cheap, if you can have gas heat, it won't cost much. The Colorado house had gas, so did the Idaho one, but in Idaho I heated mostly with wood.

Probably the Cali coast is going to be your best bet for "shirt sleeve" weather year round, say around Pleasanton. As you might expect, real estate is quite high there.

The Northwest Coast, Portland, Seattle, and surrounds, is famous for a cool but wet climate, in most places, most of the time. There are small-scale variations, "rain shadows" and etc. But if you don't like rain I would say it's not a good bet.

Another option, but one I don't have first hand experience with, would be along the coast in the Northeast.
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Old 09-11-2017, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Queen Creek, AZ
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On the opposite end of the spectrum, in Miami you almost never need heat, although most homes are equipped with heating systems (primarily heat pumps).
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Old 09-11-2017, 04:13 PM
 
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Thanks for the comments. I live in Vegas and am sick of the heat (amongst other things). I'm just not sure where to go. Considering Pittsburgh because I've heard some good things about it. I've lived in Denver, Ft. Myers (Sarasota, Punta Gorda) FL, Dallas, Chicago and Italy.

Never want to live in the south again and will never return to Vegas for anything, EVER again.

On the fence with a snowy climate, but if the city offers good doctors, educated, down-to-earth people, low crime and jobs...I'll consider it.

Also been on the fence considering Phoenix. Just don't hear good things about the economy down there and that heat is terrible. Not sure where to go.
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Old 09-11-2017, 04:18 PM
 
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I would not necessarily characterize all of San Diego as not needing AC. My cousins live up on a hill in the university city area, in a house built in the 50s. They don't have AC...but most of their neighbors have installed it.

Some parts of San Francisco could by without either--mostly in the outer areas like Sunset, where ocean breezes keep the areas cool, and the need for heat may be limited to occasional space heaters. I lived in the East Bay for a while and didn't need AC, and I think we only ran the heat once. It was just a little wall radiator in the hallway, not central heat.

Santa Barbara would be another options--again, you have to stay very close to the ocean. Even a mile from the coast would change the climate dramatically.

Chicago can get by without AC most of the time....obviously you need heat for most of the year, though.
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Old 09-11-2017, 05:30 PM
 
Location: State of Washington (2016)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarianRavenwood View Post
I would not necessarily characterize all of San Diego as not needing AC. My cousins live up on a hill in the university city area, in a house built in the 50s. They don't have AC...but most of their neighbors have installed it.

Some parts of San Francisco could by without either--mostly in the outer areas like Sunset, where ocean breezes keep the areas cool, and the need for heat may be limited to occasional space heaters. I lived in the East Bay for a while and didn't need AC, and I think we only ran the heat once. It was just a little wall radiator in the hallway, not central heat.

Santa Barbara would be another options--again, you have to stay very close to the ocean. Even a mile from the coast would change the climate dramatically.

Chicago can get by without AC most of the time....obviously you need heat for most of the year, though.
No that is not correct. Chicago has very humid, hot summers and you definitely need air conditioning. They open cooling centers for the elderly during the summer months which are frequently miserably hot.
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Old 09-11-2017, 05:31 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
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We're three miles from the ocean here. Have never turned on our heater in the winter. In the summer use the a/c 4-5 times a year if it gets into the 80's. We use ceiling fans sometimes. If you go just a few more miles east into the county it gets into the 90's and sometimes over a 100 in the summer and into the high 30's during the winter. Nonetheless I see neighbors who use a/c in the summer 24/7 not because of the temps but just to keep out street noise. San Diego has some of the highest electricity rates in the country.
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Old 09-11-2017, 05:36 PM
 
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windward Hawaii
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Old 09-11-2017, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Praline View Post
No that is not correct. Chicago has very humid, hot summers and you definitely need air conditioning. They open cooling centers for the elderly during the summer months which are frequently miserably hot.
I live in Chicago. Summers are SOMETIMES miserably hot, but certainly not like anything to the south. I have 2 window a/c units. I barely ever used the one in the living room this summer. We had a lovely mild summer. I did use the bedroom one because it faces west and is the warmest room in the house. I don't usually turn on heat til sometime in November, it comes off at the end of April, beginning of May. Winter was mild last year too, I don't know what the extended forecast is for this year.
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Old 09-11-2017, 06:10 PM
 
434 posts, read 300,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knitgirl View Post
I live in Chicago. Summers are SOMETIMES miserably hot, but certainly not like anything to the south. I have 2 window a/c units. I barely ever used the one in the living room this summer. We had a lovely mild summer. I did use the bedroom one because it faces west and is the warmest room in the house. I don't usually turn on heat til sometime in November, it comes off at the end of April, beginning of May. Winter was mild last year too, I don't know what the extended forecast is for this year.
I was born in Chicago. Compared to the dry west climates I've been exposed to, Chicago is extremely hot, muggy and equally as mosquito infested as Dallas and Flori-duh.
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