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Old 09-01-2018, 06:45 PM
 
4,641 posts, read 3,964,996 times
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A normal hill on a Montana highway has a 7 1/2 % grade....some are steeper. What time of year are you doing this? Believe it or not it has already snowed at 6,000 feet.
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Old 09-01-2018, 08:24 PM
 
859 posts, read 417,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wileykid View Post
You need to know the gross combined weight rating (GCVWR) of your truck. It means the max weight when you combine your truck and trailer, that the drivetrain and brakes are good for. That should be in your manual. It depends on engine, rear axle ratio, and stuff. The newer 1500 are 12K+ lbs. I would think yours is that, or more, which is more meaningful of the numbers you gave.

Your manual should also say max towing weight, and max hitch weight. I doubt that the U-Haul is over that. Keep the tongue weight as previously mentioned between 10-15%, and you should be good.

Basically, your truck should have no problems towing the trailer. I wouldn't give it a second thought. Just be cautious and understand that if you do something sudden, either braking or turn, that you have that weight behind you, and your truck will perform very differently. Plan your braking, and that your turn will be wider. When you are slowing down, you will feel a slight push from the trailer. That is the surge brakes, the trailer does not start braking until it actually pushes into you.

When you pick up the trailer, check it carefully. I have rented that size trailer several times, and have had to have them change a tire on several of them. Also found the front A-frame on one bent with a broken surge brake support that they wanted to rent to me.
The GCWR is 9500-10k lbs. It's a 4.3 basic wt model, unlike the v8 models most people chose. I think the latest generation up'ed their weight ratings by using even lighter material or something. It definitely drives like a silverado and makes that cluck sound when I pull off, like it has torque.

I'm convinced u cannot rely on a Uhaul employee, considering all the fish-tailing uhaul trailers I seen on the highway.
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Old 09-01-2018, 08:29 PM
 
859 posts, read 417,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by historyfan View Post
A normal hill on a Montana highway has a 7 1/2 % grade....some are steeper. What time of year are you doing this? Believe it or not it has already snowed at 6,000 feet.
I can believe that, but is the elevation already 6k ft or is that up in the actual mountains? End of october I travel.
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Old 09-01-2018, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,108 posts, read 4,037,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kynight View Post
I'm sorry, I meant anti-sway bar. I saw it's 800 pounds, but not sure how people really know the tongue weight pressing onto their hitch. I guess an empty trailer has a little tongue weight, then a few 100 lbs of things loaded in the very front.

Interesting, will include the tongue weight in the loaded truck weight.

I have a Weigh Safe hitch that has a scale built into it. There are YouTube videos on how to get a tongue weight with a bathroom scale.
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Old 09-02-2018, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,108 posts, read 4,037,600 times
Reputation: 15086
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wileykid View Post
You need to know the gross combined weight rating (GCVWR) of your truck. It means the max weight when you combine your truck and trailer, that the drivetrain and brakes are good for. That should be in your manual. It depends on engine, rear axle ratio, and stuff. The newer 1500 are 12K+ lbs. I would think yours is that, or more, which is more meaningful of the numbers you gave.

Your manual should also say max towing weight, and max hitch weight. I doubt that the U-Haul is over that. Keep the tongue weight as previously mentioned between 10-15%, and you should be good.

Basically, your truck should have no problems towing the trailer. I wouldn't give it a second thought. Just be cautious and understand that if you do something sudden, either braking or turn, that you have that weight behind you, and your truck will perform very differently. Plan your braking, and that your turn will be wider. When you are slowing down, you will feel a slight push from the trailer. That is the surge brakes, the trailer does not start braking until it actually pushes into you.

When you pick up the trailer, check it carefully. I have rented that size trailer several times, and have had to have them change a tire on several of them. Also found the front A-frame on one bent with a broken surge brake support that they wanted to rent to me.

That could present a problem if someone bought their truck used and/or they don't know the axle ratio. OP's Silverado could be 3.08, 3.42 or 3.73.

I now see that OP has a V6. That should still pull it, but it might be tough going up steep hills.
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Old 09-02-2018, 08:45 AM
 
859 posts, read 417,914 times
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Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
That could present a problem if someone bought their truck used and/or they don't know the axle ratio. OP's Silverado could be 3.08, 3.42 or 3.73.

I now see that OP has a V6. That should still pull it, but it might be tough going up steep hills.
I think mine is 3.42. I may have to stick to a more level route. The v6 leaves a lot of extra room under the hood. The only route I recall being rough is Montana.
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Old 09-02-2018, 08:49 AM
 
859 posts, read 417,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
I have a Weigh Safe hitch that has a scale built into it. There are YouTube videos on how to get a tongue weight with a bathroom scale.
I have 2 bathroom scales and plan to weight boxes before loading them with a board across them. I don't think I need to take them outside.
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Old 09-02-2018, 09:06 AM
 
208 posts, read 69,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
That could present a problem if someone bought their truck used and/or they don't know the axle ratio. OP's Silverado could be 3.08, 3.42 or 3.73.

I now see that OP has a V6. That should still pull it, but it might be tough going up steep hills.
Unless the previous owner has modified the truck, look at the build codes on the sticker in the glove compartment. It will tell you exactly what the truck had when it left the factory. Lots of websites to decode the numbers.

Your right, the V6 may not like the hills, but keeping it out of overdrive, and reasonable speed, the truck should do it.
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Old 09-02-2018, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Central New Jersey
2,316 posts, read 879,491 times
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If OP owned a Dodge he wouldn't even ask but since it's a Chevy I can understand his uncertainty.
On a side note, if it's a full size truck should be no problem.
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Old 09-02-2018, 09:31 AM
 
208 posts, read 69,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kynight View Post
The GCWR is 9500-10k lbs. It's a 4.3 basic wt model, unlike the v8 models most people chose. I think the latest generation up'ed their weight ratings by using even lighter material or something. It definitely drives like a silverado and makes that cluck sound when I pull off, like it has torque.

I'm convinced u cannot rely on a Uhaul employee, considering all the fish-tailing uhaul trailers I seen on the highway.
While U-Haul employees are usually not that smart, most of the fishtailing is the stupid drivers. Improper loading (see video in previous post), towing too fast, especially for a short wheelbase vehicle.

I made the mistake thinking U-Haul actually paid attention to the vehicles that the trailers were hooked up to, as far as capabilities, and not renting to them.
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