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Old 05-22-2008, 12:28 PM
 
Location: OH->FL->NJ
2,741 posts, read 4,053,658 times
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>(Household possesions won't put you anywhere near that). <

WRONG ANSWER! From OH to FL, the wonderful "friendly" weigh station guy in Ohio got all sorts of nasty. Penske 26' truck 25750 lbs. Full tank of diesel would have been very very close. The truck starts out at like 13000 lbs.

Past Ohio, noone cared.
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Old 05-22-2008, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 962,691 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by ottomobeale View Post
>(Household possesions won't put you anywhere near that). <

WRONG ANSWER! From OH to FL, the wonderful "friendly" weigh station guy in Ohio got all sorts of nasty. Penske 26' truck 25750 lbs. Full tank of diesel would have been very very close. The truck starts out at like 13000 lbs.

Past Ohio, noone cared.
Most weigh stationmasters cut a non-CDL rental truck some slack on the gross weight, 500 to 1000 pounds overweight is usually not a problem on a 26 foot rental truck, notice 26 foot, not less than 26 feet! But, if the driver has an attitude and/or the truck is poorly loaded, be prepared to spend some time at the weigh station and/or being transported to the local magistrate/justice of the peace for some friendly fine paying! Please note that most overweight fines are at least, $1.00 per pound overweight (more than 26,000# non-CDL) plus court costs. It all lies with the mood of the weigh master, the attitude of the driver and the weight distribution of the truck. As a suggestion, when the truck is fully loaded and all fuel tanks are filled, go to the nearest truck scale, usually a truck stop/fuel plaza and get the heavy (gross) weight of the truck, be sure that the scale is a DOT certified scale and keep the weight ticket with the truck, should weight problems arise. Try to stay at 25,500 pounds gross weight fully loaded for a 26" non-CDL rental truck. Smaller trucks have lower gross weight limits which are declared on the truck, do not exceed those limits! Again, get a gross (heavy) weight of your truck when you are fully loaded. Some scales weigh with driver and passenger on-board, some do not, that will marked on the weight ticket. The tare (light) weight of a non-CDL 26' rental is usually 13,000 to 15,000 pounds and is declared on the truck (without on-board equiptment), depending upon truck and on-board equipment such as pads, hand trucks, dollies, etc. It is also a good idea to get the light weight of a rental truck before loading to know how much weight you can load onto the truck. If you use the same scale to get the light and heavy weight of the truck, there is usually no or a reduced charge for the second (gross) weight. States are looking for revenue wherever they can find it, don't be the one to contribute to their tax fund! And have a safe move!
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Old 05-26-2008, 07:36 AM
 
6,351 posts, read 13,235,928 times
Reputation: 9691
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hazzard View Post
Any vehicle being used for commercial purposed weighing more than 10,000 pounds (GRVW) "Gross Registered Vehicle Weight" is required to run through weigh stations. The 26,000 pound weight limit mentioned is for the purpose of truck and driver classification. Trucks weighing more than 26,000 pounds using air brakes and/or hauling hazardous or flammable material require a CDL (Commercial Drivers License) rated driver and vehicle. Vehicles weighing less than 26,000 pounds GRVW, but not equipped with air brakes and/or not hauling hazardous and/or flammable material and in commercial service, require a DOT rated non-CDL driver and equipment. All commercial vehicles rated at more than 10,000 pounds GRVW must run through weigh stations.
Your info is correct. However, if it's a U Haul-type vehicle being rented to haul one's OWN personal HHG & effects, MOST states don't require you to cross the scales. And DOT rules mostly don't apply to non-CDL holders renting U Hauls. As previously stated, it's always a good idea to cross, anyway.

Steve, you've made some good points about U Haul-type vehicles attracting more attention in general from law enforcement nowadays! Law enforcement is finding more drugs and other contraband hidden in them. I've especially noticed U Hauls pulled over on I-70 in OH and IN on a regular basis. If you're doing ANYTHING illegal or have an equipment defect, law enforcement sees that as 'probable cause" for a traffic stop in most cases.
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Old 05-26-2008, 07:48 AM
 
6,351 posts, read 13,235,928 times
Reputation: 9691
Quote:
Originally Posted by ottomobeale View Post
>(Household possesions won't put you anywhere near that). <

WRONG ANSWER! From OH to FL, the wonderful "friendly" weigh station guy in Ohio got all sorts of nasty. Penske 26' truck 25750 lbs. Full tank of diesel would have been very very close. The truck starts out at like 13000 lbs.

Past Ohio, noone cared.
Ottomobeale, there's one in every crowd... With only a couple of exceptions, all of my dealings with commercial enforcement and cops in general have been professional and the official was courteous. And, as a general rule, household loads are usually light compared to commercial shipments. (There are the avid readers that ship vast libraries. And others who ship things like complete home gyms.) But, IMPO, most HHG loads tend to put the truck well under it's GVW.

(When I was new to trucking, I picked up a load that "looked OK" on the trailer tandems. Crossed the KY scales and got the "GREEN" light. Down in TN, they fined me for being 2200# over on my trailer tandems; "$224, please!")
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Old 05-26-2008, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 962,691 times
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Crew Chief
Quote:
(When I was new to trucking, I picked up a load that "looked OK" on the trailer tandems. Crossed the KY scales and got the "GREEN" light. Down in TN, they fined me for being 2200# over on my trailer tandems; "$224, please!")
Speaking as an ex owner-operator for United Van Lines, Household Goods Division for 12 years, I also l learned the hard way (money!) about truck weights and weight distribution in different states. As I recall, Kentucky, Ohio, North and South Carolina, Texas and California were the toughest on truckers when rolling through the weigh stations. I remember being ticketed in Kentucky because the unit number of my truck wasn't big enough for Kentucky DOT regulations! As we both know, there is no such thing as "violate now, pay later"! I made several "courtesy trips" to the local magistrate/justice of the peace to pay my fines! The alternative was the "graybar motel", that would be jail folks!

Last edited by Steve Hazzard; 05-26-2008 at 12:45 PM.. Reason: Correcy typos.
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Old 11-08-2008, 11:42 PM
 
16 posts, read 68,983 times
Reputation: 29
I recently moved from Colorado to Florida in a 26 foot Penske truck. I did an online search about stopping at weigh stations, and found this website. I wanted to know if I had to stop at weight stations. The only consistent answer I found was yes, no and maybe. Every state apparantly has different rules. It is very confusing. I decided I was better off stopping at all weigh stations, rather than getting pulled over by a state trooper and explaining to him/her that I did not think I had to, or spending the time to research every state's rules. I want to post my experience here, to help others. I went through about 15 or so stations in the big truck, with my wife driving our family car, following behind. Most of the stations are very easy. You drive through the station anywhere from 10 - 35 miles per hour, depending on the posted thru station speed limit. As you drive, the signs clearly tell you what to do. Most of the time there is a traffic light telling you when to stop and when to go. Somewhere in that process, you drive over the scale and it reads your weight. 95% of the time I drove through without stopping. One time there was a green light telling me to drive forward onto the scales. When I was on the scale the light turned red, telling me to come to a stop on the scale. A state trooper asked me, over a loudspeaker, if I was carrying my own personal stuff. The trooper was in a building, so I could not see his face. I looked in the direction of that building and shook my head yes. He very politely thanked me and told me to proceed on through. I guess with my wife driving our family car, following me through each weigh station (so we wouldn't get separated on the highway if the stop took some time), and our two dogs in the backseat of the car looking out the window at the troopers, it was obvious I was hauling our personal things. I figured out that these troopers see so many trucks each day, they don't want to talk to me any more than I want to talk to them. After crossing into Florida, I stopped at an agricultural inspection station just inside the border. I pulled up to a booth that was like a toll takers booth and talked face to face with a trooper who told me to pull over so they could look at my cargo. I followed his instructions. I opened the back door. They looked for about 5 seconds, then I was on my way. Along the way, I learned many reasons why they have weigh stations. States charge truckers a per mile tax, an a lot of other fees I would call nuisance fees. I'm sure they want to collect. If a truck is overloaded, the brakes can heat up and potentially cause a fire. They say an overloaded truck can tear up the road, but if that were really a concern, why would they allow over size and over weight vehicles at all? I think the weigh stations are there mostly just to collect revenue for the state. By the way, rumor has it that some trucking companies rent the Penske and Uhaul trucks to carry their commercial stuff to avoid the fees. I don't know if that is true, but in this crazy world it is certainly possible. Along the way, I talked to a retired trucker. He told me that the fine for passing by a weigh station is $100. By the way, I got so used to looking at the scale weigh our family car as my wife drove over it each time, right behind me, that I now know how much it weighs.
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Old 11-09-2008, 05:13 AM
 
Location: Amelia View
2,910 posts, read 7,588,586 times
Reputation: 2146
Quote:
yes, no and maybe. Every state apparantly has different rules
traveler4444 -- you're correct, and you were wise to pull into every weigh station. We were in the same situation a year ago with the same questions, and we decided just to pull in and either get weighed or waved off (that happened, too).

Especially important was stopping at the Florida border's agricultural inspection station. On occasion one can fly right by without consequence, but now that I live in northern Florida and travel often by that station, I see many UHauls and Penskes etc pulled over to the side by 'Smokies'. It's a crap shoot to know whether or not the state troopers are in the mood or have the resources to enforce the stop or not. Reading other posters' experiences about the consequences, it's worth the time to make the weigh station stops rather than take a gamble.
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Old 09-09-2010, 04:29 PM
 
1 posts, read 42,204 times
Reputation: 11
i just started a new job delivering for a bakery. I am driving a curbmaster 24. I am still intraining and didn't realize I missed a weigh station. I got a citation, but there is not fine on it. (This is nj). I have to call in to get it. Any place where I can find out what this will cost me? Is there any leniency if I plead my case?
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Old 09-10-2010, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Terra
178 posts, read 419,216 times
Reputation: 106
You will have to stop at the station prior to leaving the Florida state line, all moving trucks commerial or rental have to stop when leaving that State, at least they required it when I moved. I was told otherwise and was pulled over by flashing lights when I drove by it, the questions they asked if we had any plants or produce which we didn't have any and if all the belongings in the truck was ours, then he make us open the back of the uhaul and he looked around. No other states required it from FL to MO, but I pulled into each inspection station anyway and they just waved me by.

Last edited by Peperosso; 09-10-2010 at 02:13 AM..
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Old 09-15-2010, 03:32 PM
 
Location: The Middle
5,249 posts, read 8,048,782 times
Reputation: 6658
I didn't stop with my uhaul. I had a 24 footer. I looked on line briefly and the two states I was traveling through said no weigh station stops for personal goods. But my Uncle told me I should. So I called my Dad who is a retired truck driver and had been busted before with weight overages. I figured if anyone really knew it would be him. He said the states I was traveling through did not require it but he said Ohio was kind of iffy. I avoided Ohio. It really is not a big deal, I went through many of them with my Dad as kid. During the summers I would go the road with him. I just didnt want to deal with the hassle of it. Turns out the weekend I moved the weigh stations I passed were closed anyway. It is a smart thing to consider though, no one wants to add a ticket to their moving adventure.
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