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Old 03-26-2009, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Coachella Valley, California
15,564 posts, read 36,463,973 times
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We left California and moved to Texas and were there for 9 months as well. We bit the bullet and moved back home to CA. Yes, we lost money on the brand new fabulous house we had built in TX, but to be back home is the greatest feeling in the world. Sure, we lost money, but it was a sacrifice we were more than willing to make to be back home where we are happy and comfortable. I wish you the best of luck in whatever you decide to do.
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Old 03-26-2009, 02:45 PM
 
Location: TX
87 posts, read 255,275 times
Reputation: 52
Twinkle Toes - Thanks. I'm sure we can make it work if we stay, but moving back may be the best in the long run. It's only money!
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Old 03-26-2009, 03:21 PM
 
2,312 posts, read 6,665,010 times
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Here's a technique I use sometimes: imagine you are 80 years old looking back on your life. Would you regret not staying in TX, or would you be glad you moved back to OH?
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Old 03-26-2009, 03:34 PM
 
Location: TX
87 posts, read 255,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clevedark View Post
Here's a technique I use sometimes: imagine you are 80 years old looking back on your life. Would you regret not staying in TX, or would you be glad you moved back to OH?

It would be go back to Ohio without a doubt!!!
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Old 03-26-2009, 03:35 PM
 
Location: TX
87 posts, read 255,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clevedark View Post
Here's a technique I use sometimes: imagine you are 80 years old looking back on your life. Would you regret not staying in TX, or would you be glad you moved back to OH?
The only thing is I may regreat quitting a job in a horrible economy. What a time for this decision
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Old 03-26-2009, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Wishing It Was Wisconsin
534 posts, read 1,419,850 times
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I can totally understand where you are coming from. We moved from Wisconsin(where we lived our whole lives)to Iowa for a job promotion as well(hubby's). I know how hard this was for you, the only difference is we have no children. That would've made our move even harder.

If we could pack up and go back tonight, it would be a done deal. However, for us it just isn't that easy. My husband would stay with the company, since he's been with them for 15 years now. Plus they love his work ethic and wouldn't want him to leave the company. However, he would have to take a paycut.

We aren't going to be able to afford a house in Wisconsin. Cost of living here is cheaper and we do have an adorable house. If for some reason we had to move into an apartment, we would be gone. We wouldn't live in an apartment here when we can do that easily back home in Wisconsin.

The city we are in flooded horribly last summer. We both agreed if it happened again before we were able to move back, we would be gone. The city hasn't done much to bring anything back and another flood would pretty much wipe out the city.

We were like you and ready to move back within 3 months of being here. It's now 5 years later. We've come accustomed to where we live. We do love our house. The city, that's another thing. I know the anxious feelings you are having.

My advice would be to stick it out a bit. You never know. We get back home 2 or 3 times a year and family comes here just as much. Granted, we are closer to our home state then you are, so travelling isn't too bad(3 1/2-4hr drive). If we would have moved back right away, we would have really put ourselves in a bad situation.

We do plan on moving back. We have discussed this so much and have come to terms with hanging in here another 2 years or so. We have a few things we want to pay off and those will be done in 2 years. Once that is gone, we will have that extra money we will need to move back. Until then, we are just thankful we have jobs and that my husband's company isn't going anywhere unless they stop making cars(no he isn't working for a dealership or any car company). His company is booming with business and we are thankful for that everyday.

Whatever your decision is, I wish you the best of luck.
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Old 03-26-2009, 05:09 PM
 
Location: TX
87 posts, read 255,275 times
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I too have been with this company a long time. 16 years. That would be a lot to give up. Thanks for all of the input - this forum is great and is helping a lot.
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Old 03-26-2009, 05:42 PM
 
7,099 posts, read 24,436,097 times
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think of how it would look on a resume to have to show that you only stayed on the new job 9 months before you started looking around for another one. Not a good recommendation!

Wait at least a year. And say that you found that you were not doing a good job because you found out the hard way that you really didn't do well traveling that much.
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Old 03-26-2009, 09:17 PM
 
1,688 posts, read 6,879,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rusheib View Post
We have been here about 9 months. I know the kids will adjust and so will we, but I'm not sure if I want that adjustment. Does that mean they will learn not to be so close to their extended family and get used to it? They will, but is that the best thing for them?
I'd like to address this - i.e. bringing up children away from extended family.

It need not mean "we are here, you are there and never the twain shall meet". Far, far from it.

For what it's worth: my siblings and I grew up thousands and thousands of miles away from my extended family. My father's job kept us moving all over.

It is, to a huge extent, up to you and your wife. Out of sight, doesn't mean out of mind. Ohio to Texas... well, in this day and age, it is but a hop, skip and jump.

My siblings and I spent every summer back with extended family - and I mean the entire summer holiday from school! (My aunt should have had her head examined bless her! ) I grew up being extremely close to all my grandparents, my aunts and uncles, my cousins. We once added up how long we'd actually lived with my aunt and uncle... and it came out to years. Our summer holidays were just superb (in our book, adults might have had a different view) - something very special that we all remember, and get hysterical laughing about, to this day.

Maybe what I'm trying to say it that quantity isn't necessarily a reflection of quality. I know that's a horrid cliche and it pains me to use it, but I can't think of a better way to phrase it.

I don't remember this, but my mother tells me that as I child I told her that it was ok if she and my father passed on because I knew I'd go live with my aunt and uncle. As mortifying as it is to hear that as an adult, but now myself a parent, I realise that it means something entirely different to a parent to hear that. But my point is that I'd left living in that area (actually we left the country!) at the age of three... but I was close enough to extended family to feel that years later regardless of having lived on a different continent most of the time.

At the end of the day, there is the phone, there is the internet, there are cards to be made and written, there are trips to be made. And it's a two way street... you go there, they come to you. All will learn in the process. It will require more effort - absolutely. And the shape of the relationship may change slightly too.... but it will take on a unique shape all its own.

I hope this helps.
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Old 03-27-2009, 01:31 AM
 
Location: Some place very cold
5,500 posts, read 20,012,098 times
Reputation: 4220
I think your wife is right. You made a decision.

I would say stick it out for a few years and get the experience. You've been there almost a year and another year will go by quickly. While you are working, keep networking.

These are tough times and they'll probably get tougher. There's no easy jobs right now. Every one is working harder for less, myself included. So if you can save money, and find a way to use this time to get a little ahead in some way, that might be good. Beside, the economy in Ohio stinks, and the one in Houston is okay.
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