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Old 01-24-2010, 07:02 PM
 
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I've begun to notice how anyone's house I went into in the 70's-90's were always clean and very tidy. Now seems like most homes I go into people have sh*t piled up in every inch of floor space and can't sit on their own furniture for crap being piled high on it. And those friends I notice that have homes like that all have either ADD or depression. And no I'm not an armchair psychologist. I just happen to notice this. BTW- I have ADD and noticed after a bad breakup I quit being tidy and having every Saturday be cleaning day.

I decided to do something about it and notice as the clutter disappears as I am preparing to move I feel more clear headed. Several people told me that moving was the greatest thing because they threw away a lot of junk and learned from it how to never let it pile up again. I have a friend who's house looks like a disaster area. There is no space to sit with a plate at the table to eat, nor one empty spot on the kitchen counter. Her marriage is falling apart, her kids now adults are both badly troubled. She has bi-polar, ADD and depression. She keeps complaining to me about her family and I can't help but think that if she cleaned up her house that it might also cleanup her family relationships. I swear I think this might help a lot of people.

Anyone else moving and throwing out clutter and noticed these things?
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Old 01-24-2010, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
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I don't think clutter is a major problem. ADD and other mental illnesses are.
I doubt people were significantly less cluttered in the 1970s-1990s either.
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Old 01-24-2010, 07:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
I don't think clutter is a major problem. ADD and other mental illnesses are.
I doubt people were significantly less cluttered in the 1970s-1990s either.
Then Charles how do you explain why use to people's houses were easy to walk around in and furniture and countertops were clear. But in past ten years every house I go into junk is stacked one on top of another and you have to be careful where you walk?
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Old 01-24-2010, 08:11 PM
 
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There are a lot of historians that agree with you, mtneer. Many believe America’s clutter addiction was fathered by the excesses of the Greatest Generation after WW II and nurtured by the affluence that Boomers have languished in it for the last twenty five years.

Check out Jon MooAllem’s well researched article, The Self-Storage Self - Storing All the Stuff We Accumulate (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/06/magazine/06self-storage-t.html&ei=zu2nSpSJNJW4NbPt5bEP&sa=X&oi=spellmeleon _result&resnum=1&ct=result&usg=AFQjCNEAe54rhsVyXUi 40HUm1w0aBPTbWg - broken link) at http://www.city-data.com/blogs/blog1...e-secrets.html
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Old 01-24-2010, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtneer View Post
Then Charles how do you explain why use to people's houses were easy to walk around in and furniture and countertops were clear. But in past ten years every house I go into junk is stacked one on top of another and you have to be careful where you walk?
And that many of those houses are much larger than those tidy ones of yesteryear....
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Old 01-24-2010, 08:33 PM
 
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And another thing garages used to have cars, the kid's bicycles and even a work bench for the men to work at. These days when I see people's garage's they have junk stacked clear up to the ceiling and park their cars in the driveway!! It's interesting to look when you drive down the road and they have the garage door up.
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Old 01-24-2010, 08:55 PM
 
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I know that with kids it is cheap toys. They are much more inexpensive than they used to be when I was growing up. I had two barbie dolls (still have them in near perfect condition). I think they cost about as much then (1970s) as they do now. Thus my inlaws who spoil my kids rotten, do not think twice about buying them toys for absolutely no reason at all. My daughter has many many barbiedolls. (mattel loves us) We had to wait until a birthday or christmas back then.
I am continually giving away toys.
In general, things were much more expensive then (made in america). but really was it so terrible to have to save up to buy something nice? Instead of going out and being able to afford just about anything - but have it be really lousy quality and have it fall apart after a couple years. I think it is the disposable goods culture that is at fault.
Unfortunately there are those who once they get something - find it extremely trying mentally to get rid of things... ala "hoarders".
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Old 01-24-2010, 09:01 PM
 
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I know part of the problem for me was embracing the recycling culture. Now recycling is a good thing but if you keep things forever that you don't use because you *might* have a use for them someday or because you can't bear throwing it away that is not healthy. The only way I can deal with that is to recycle the hoards of junk mail & magazines and donate all the stuff to Goodwill that someone else might be able to use. I won't tell you how many pair of socks I found to donate this weekend.

Check out this article on mental health and clutter
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/01/health/01well.html

http://healthfieldmedicare.suite101...._mental_health

Last edited by mtneer; 01-24-2010 at 09:18 PM..
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Old 01-24-2010, 09:06 PM
 
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I am a big fan of donating things - unfortunately most places will not take baby things (liability issues). Though there is a crisis pregnancy place near here that will take almost anything.
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Old 01-24-2010, 09:13 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,353,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtneer View Post
I've begun to notice how anyone's house I went into in the 70's-90's were always clean and very tidy. Now seems like most homes I go into people have sh*t piled up in every inch of floor space and can't sit on their own furniture for crap being piled high on it. And those friends I notice that have homes like that all have either ADD or depression. And no I'm not an armchair psychologist. I just happen to notice this. BTW- I have ADD and noticed after a bad breakup I quit being tidy and having every Saturday be cleaning day.

I decided to do something about it and notice as the clutter disappears as I am preparing to move I feel more clear headed. Several people told me that moving was the greatest thing because they threw away a lot of junk and learned from it how to never let it pile up again. I have a friend who's house looks like a disaster area. There is no space to sit with a plate at the table to eat, nor one empty spot on the kitchen counter. Her marriage is falling apart, her kids now adults are both badly troubled. She has bi-polar, ADD and depression. She keeps complaining to me about her family and I can't help but think that if she cleaned up her house that it might also cleanup her family relationships. I swear I think this might help a lot of people.

Anyone else moving and throwing out clutter and noticed these things?
I think a lot of it has to do with living an a more consumer-minded culture now, than previously.

My house is pretty cluttered, but I have a tiny house. I don't have a lot of unnecessary stuff. In fact, I once tried to declutter, and I spent more time running back and forth to the storage unit to get things I needed on a day by day basis than was worth it. In the end, I was paying $200 a year for a storage unit that had two boxes in it!

I recall as a child visiting the house of a friend that was so cluttered all there was between rooms was a little trail. LOL it really astounded me how anyone could live in a house like that. But I expect her mother was a hoarder and had some serious mental issues.

I moved from a larger house to a smaller one two years ago, and now I am much more cluttered than I used to be. I lost a bedroom in the process which is where we stored a lot of "stuff" which is now tucked here and there, elsewhere around the house.

20yrsinBranson
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