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Old 11-06-2010, 05:19 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,687,151 times
Reputation: 1869

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Quote:
Originally Posted by debzkidz View Post
My grandparents would occasionally say "I suwanee" as well. I had totally forgotten that until you mentioned it. I would love to know what the origin of that saying is. It's so weird sounding. I can just hear my great uncle saying it now, while chewing on his big fat cigar, or SEEgar as he called it.
I have heard "I'll swanee" all my life (in Louisiana) mainly from the older gen. Not so much younger folks. 2 generations ago little old ladies said "Dear gussie" as exclaiming disgust about something usually trivial. Maybe some lower midwesterners use these too (the ones ajacent to the south). lawdy mussie.

Last edited by hdwell; 11-06-2010 at 06:10 PM.. Reason: add info
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Old 11-07-2010, 09:51 AM
 
4,465 posts, read 7,018,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alamosakid View Post
hmm, I had no idea of the lineage that "okie dokie" stems from. I know I said it occasionally in Detroit, but in Wisconsin, there was no "ok, alright, sure" --it was just "okie dokie!"
Where in Wisconsin?
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Old 11-07-2010, 11:36 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,049,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urza216 View Post
In the TV show Reba, there was a Texas woman who always said "Okie Dokie, smokey".

I've heard "okilly dokilly" before and "okie dokie" in the Chicago area. I'm not so sure it's Midwestern though. It's not something that is commonly said by many people but I have heard it before and I know what it means. I hear black people say "y'all" all the time but I couldn't tell you the last time I heard anyone say "okie dokie".
We said okey dokey in Western NY where I grew up. Okilly dokilly? I thought Ned Flanders was the only one who says that!
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Old 12-04-2010, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
311 posts, read 692,869 times
Reputation: 161
How about "wallago" as a description of when something happened? Anybody else hear that one much?
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:42 AM
 
119 posts, read 239,489 times
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I lived in Akron, OH briefly, and the people there call the area of grass between the sidewalk and the street "The Devil's Strip." I asked why, and was given two answers. One is because that is yard that the city owns, but you still have to take care of. Another reason given to me was because that is where most car crashes end up and people die. It seems to me like the first reason has more validity. Has anyone else heard this saying? I'm from about an hour west of Akron in Northern Ohio, and we've always called that area the "tree lawn." What an interesting topic! I love local dialects!
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,726,044 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by Azure Ray View Post
I lived in Akron, OH briefly, and the people there call the area of grass between the sidewalk and the street "The Devil's Strip." I asked why, and was given two answers. One is because that is yard that the city owns, but you still have to take care of. Another reason given to me was because that is where most car crashes end up and people die. It seems to me like the first reason has more validity. Has anyone else heard this saying? I'm from about an hour west of Akron in Northern Ohio, and we've always called that area the "tree lawn." What an interesting topic! I love local dialects!
Never heard that one, it made me remember this though........
I was driving with my mom one day in Poplar Bluff, Mo, and she told me to turn to the left. Instead of saying, "get into the turning lane", she said, "get into the suicide lane".
I had never heard her say that before, and I have never heard that anywhere else, anybody familiar with that one?
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Old 12-05-2010, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Northern Minnesota
141 posts, read 239,097 times
Reputation: 87
I've called the center lane the suicide lane before... I only use it on stretches where both directions of traffic have access to the turn lane though.
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Old 12-05-2010, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Edmond, OK
4,036 posts, read 9,196,631 times
Reputation: 4180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Azure Ray View Post
I lived in Akron, OH briefly, and the people there call the area of grass between the sidewalk and the street "The Devil's Strip." I asked why, and was given two answers. One is because that is yard that the city owns, but you still have to take care of. Another reason given to me was because that is where most car crashes end up and people die. It seems to me like the first reason has more validity. Has anyone else heard this saying? I'm from about an hour west of Akron in Northern Ohio, and we've always called that area the "tree lawn." What an interesting topic! I love local dialects!
Growing up in Texas we always referred to that area as the "parkway". I agree, this is an interesting topic.
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Old 12-06-2010, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,319 posts, read 21,890,925 times
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Pretty common in Minnesota to hear someone say, "...come with?" such as, "Hey I'm going up to the Wood-chipper store, do ya wanna come with?"
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Old 02-03-2011, 02:29 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,049,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by debzkidz View Post
Growing up in Texas we always referred to that area as the "parkway". I agree, this is an interesting topic.
Here in the Twin Cities, it is called the "boulevard".
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