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Old 06-19-2007, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Toledo
3,861 posts, read 7,595,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missymomof3 View Post
yayoi they say pop in Cinci? I figured that it would be soda there or even Coke. I didn't think you were North enough for that but I guess I was wrong.
Yup, they say pop there, although I don't hear it nearly as much as I do in northern Ohio.
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Old 06-19-2007, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
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Apparently that term is used here too though I never hear it, I have always said coke or on occasion soda ( My husband is Irish, I blame it on him), but maybe people in the urban parts use it?
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Old 06-19-2007, 08:03 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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They say soda and pop in the Midwest. Pop is heard in most of it, but in the part I live in and also the Eastern Wisconsin, they say soda. Southern Indiana and Indianapolis actually say "coke"
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Old 06-19-2007, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
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oooooooh ok thanks!
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Old 06-19-2007, 08:43 AM
j33
 
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This is going to get into some sort of weirdo 'defining' the midwest thread. The 'midwest' is a huge area that encompasses more than one accent and more than one cultural/social attitude. Believe you me, there is a huge difference between Detroit and Omaha, and they are both in the midwest
I think that trying to prescribe 'one midwest' for the purposes of sayings, accents, etc. simply cannot be done.
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Old 06-19-2007, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
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That is true. Ok how about Lower Midwest sayings?
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Old 06-19-2007, 09:17 AM
 
Location: The Bay State
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Uff da!

Uff da - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
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Old 06-19-2007, 09:44 AM
j33
 
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Haha. I knew someone from north dakota who used to say that. In college my friends and I would often (after a few drinks) get into all sorts of funny discussions mocking each other of their regionally specific accents and/or sayings, and her propensity toward uttering the word 'uff-da' was always brought up.
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Old 06-19-2007, 09:58 AM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,043,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
Well, the upper midwest is the midwest, is it not? And no, the dialect of the midwest is not sterotypical American. "Pop" for soda (sometimes pronounced "Pahhp", all sorts of strange things my extended family in Nebraska says that I don't think of as sterotypical American as much as poor English (where's it at?), etc. You really need to get out more.
LOL, brought back memories of the first time I came to the midwest when I was 19. I was at the University of Iowa, and it seemed like everyone I met in that state ended every other sentence with the word "at". Considered poor English where I was from, but even people with masters degrees spoke this way. Lots of these educated people also routinely used phrases like "He don't...", "I ain't..." and one of my favorites, "them'uns" ("those" to non-Iowans).
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Old 06-19-2007, 10:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yayoi View Post
Yup, ya know or yanno (long O) and pop.
"Pop" is the standard term in Western NY.
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