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Old 09-25-2010, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
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Do you want me to borrow you some money (instead of lend you). I don't know why this is said but it's definitely regional and probably just Minnesotan, because I've been caught saying it a few times in Ohio and I am IMMEDIATELY corrected (which I should be), but it is said commonly around here. It's one of the more "backwards" phrases I know of in Minnesota.
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Old 09-27-2010, 08:50 PM
 
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I remember seeing a few things with Northern Cities Shift that recently St. Louis is starting to drift away from it in younger speakers. One thing is that certain vowels are still not shifting and shifted ones are shifting away but not to the surrounding area but in a different direction. The stereotypical accent is largely confined to those aged 50 or older while younger people have a different accent.
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Old 09-28-2010, 05:39 AM
 
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actually the northern cities shift is getting even stronger in the st. louis area:

The city of St. Louis is located squarely in the South Midland region, but it has long been recognized as a center of Northern linguistic influence. On most Atlas maps, the St. Louis speakers show features that are held in common with the North, notable particularly in the long high and mid vowels, and there a corridor of northern influence that runs from northern Illinois to St. Louis (see Map 1). However, the specific configuration of St. Louis vowel system is local to the city in several respects. The most remarkable of these is a merger of /ahr/ and /ohr/ in card and cord, usually at the level of the mid vowel. This merger appears to be waning among younger speakers, and the vowel system seems to be shifting even more in the direction of the Inland North.

National Map

it's the old st. louis urban dialect that is wearing away, being replaced by a more general northern shift instead of the throwback urban features of yesteryear.
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Old 09-28-2010, 09:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slengel View Post
actually the northern cities shift is getting even stronger in the st. louis area:

The city of St. Louis is located squarely in the South Midland region, but it has long been recognized as a center of Northern linguistic influence. On most Atlas maps, the St. Louis speakers show features that are held in common with the North, notable particularly in the long high and mid vowels, and there a corridor of northern influence that runs from northern Illinois to St. Louis (see Map 1). However, the specific configuration of St. Louis vowel system is local to the city in several respects. The most remarkable of these is a merger of /ahr/ and /ohr/ in card and cord, usually at the level of the mid vowel. This merger appears to be waning among younger speakers, and the vowel system seems to be shifting even more in the direction of the Inland North.

National Map

it's the old st. louis urban dialect that is wearing away, being replaced by a more general northern shift instead of the throwback urban features of yesteryear.
I think what I was reading was something more recent that shows signs of drifting away since that was published. Either in some vowel sounds reverting or lessining the shift or is shifting to something different from other areas. It was from the same person who did this paper.

I am not saying old St. Louis area dialect is returning but a new one could be emerging that is influenced by that and shifts away from Northern Shift. I have noticed if there is a Northern Shift it seems most prominent among people in their 30's and 40's with different dialects to people younger or older.
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Old 09-28-2010, 11:10 AM
 
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I hear:

"hold up" as in saying you need to slow down and repeat what you just said, or if going somewhere you need to stop and wait.

"uff-da" !! Love this one - my dad always says this when he's drinking and gets a really strong drink. It's kinda like "wow!". He says it because our family is from Sweden originally - and it came from that region. I'm guessing it was more northern Minn. and N.D, Wisc. since most people in Iowa had no idea what I was talking about.

You Betchya must be much more up north, because if I ever heard that in Iowa, Illinois or Southern Wisconsin I would immediately think the person was dumb, or probably just picture Sarah Palin I guess.

"You guys" is a general way to address anyone. I would have no problem walking into a room full of women and asking "what are you guys up to?" and they would answer as if nothing was wrong.

Pop as everyone has already mentioned.....

I started to say "jag" after I moved to Chicago. Basically means someone is acting like a moron.

What about "pitch in"? Used if you're in a group who is throwing money in while paying at a restaurant, etc. and you want to know how much everyone needs to contribute.

Does everyone call it a "potluck" when you bring a dish to a party?

In Iowa we called shopping bags "sacks". I had a few instances in Chicago where I kept asking for a sack, and the woman behind the register just stared at me in complete confusion.
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Old 09-28-2010, 12:02 PM
 
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I am trying to think if there are any particular words that are said in St. Louis but can't think of any unique terms. Most of the words that are used in other parts of the Midwest would give funny looks in St. Louis, especially the use of the word pop. (actually the use of soda is the closest thing to a local term due to other areas around it not saying that)

I am thinking why most Midwest terms don't seem to show up in St. Louis or even must anywhere in Missouri. Is it the fact that it is an outlier state or just more isolated geogrphically from the great lakes core.
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Old 09-28-2010, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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"Hey lookie there up in the sky! It's one of them aeroplane thingies..."
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Old 09-28-2010, 02:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
I am trying to think if there are any particular words that are said in St. Louis but can't think of any unique terms. Most of the words that are used in other parts of the Midwest would give funny looks in St. Louis, especially the use of the word pop. (actually the use of soda is the closest thing to a local term due to other areas around it not saying that)

I am thinking why most Midwest terms don't seem to show up in St. Louis or even must anywhere in Missouri. Is it the fact that it is an outlier state or just more isolated geogrphically from the great lakes core.
the term "hoosier" means something entirely different in the st. louis area than anywhere else in the country. to most of the usa, hoosier refers to someone from indiana. in the st. louis metro, it refers to urban white trash and absolutely nothing to do with indiana.
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Old 09-28-2010, 02:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by slengel View Post
the term "hoosier" means something entirely different in the st. louis area than anywhere else in the country. to most of the usa, hoosier refers to someone from indiana. in the st. louis metro, it refers to urban white trash and absolutely nothing to do with indiana.
Forgot about that one and that is a good example. I think it actually does have some connection to Indiana if I am not mistaken but the word origon is something that is a bit fuzzy. I think the reason the word is used has to do with the fact that similar words were not coined yet or in widespread use at the time. Although I do think it is a word that is starting to die out and is replaced by words that have similar meaning.
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Old 09-28-2010, 03:55 PM
 
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^as I understand it, the term hoosier (for urban white trash) in St. Louis originated from early settlers from indiana who settled here during the civil war and brought with them their lack of sophistication. that was the end of its connection to indiana, as far as st. louisis concerned. being a transplant to st. louis, i do not see this term being replaced with another one. it is very st. louis, and seems to be used ubiquitously across generations. my next door neighbor's 11-year-old son yelled "hoosier" out the window to a car racing loudly by. it's not dying out.
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