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Old 09-28-2008, 08:19 PM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 15,321,803 times
Reputation: 1589

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Any suburb that has had development past 1980 about
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Old 09-28-2008, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Avondale, Chicago
14,413 posts, read 26,235,463 times
Reputation: 9448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakewooder View Post
Hey wait a minute - take Dallas off the list and put its suburbs on there -- specifically Frisco, Texas.
You could say the same for Houston, but a continuing trend is for people coming in, tearing down an old house and plopping down a McMansion.

Still...



http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g1/jfre81/105-2.jpg (broken link)













There's variety to be found in Houston if you look.
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Old 09-28-2008, 10:52 PM
 
Location: The Valley of the Sun
97 posts, read 189,633 times
Reputation: 130
Yes jd433, I agree. Maybe that's how I've become so sensitized to the particle board palaces glutting the Valley That old song "Little Boxes" of ticky-tacky applies, except now they are big boxes. Still ticky-tacky.

You have to scrounge around to find modern. Here is one: Modern Phoenix home tour pics - Page 2 - SkyscraperPage Forum There are others right here on city data.
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Old 09-28-2008, 10:59 PM
 
3,669 posts, read 8,840,225 times
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I would say anywhere in Southern California the houses all pretty much look the same: single story homes that are 3-4 bedroom, 1 or 2 bathroom with stucco exterior, Spanish/Mexican influence, and have little yards with fake grass, few trees, and the address painted on the curb of the street. Of course there are exceptions such as Beverly Hills or the wealthy parts of Orange and S.D. County.
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Old 09-28-2008, 11:04 PM
 
Location: GIlbert, AZ
3,022 posts, read 4,524,879 times
Reputation: 2052
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd433 View Post
Believe me Phoenix is the worst. It is a cookie cutter stuccoville of nothing but Stucco walls concrete roofs and rocks... All the homes look the same and are very close together with little yards.
if the streets where not named, I wouldnt know where I was because ALL of the homes look the same here, all of the shops look the same, all the highways look the same, all the the mountains look the same. The sun is always shinning all day ever damn day, maybe even at night here, Im too afraid to look. The schools look exactly the same, all the towns look like all the other towns. All the cars here are burnt orange mustangs. I agree that phoenix takes the title. Houston has some charactor, but I don't think I would want to live there either.
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Old 09-28-2008, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Paramus, NJ
500 posts, read 1,255,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
I would say anywhere in Southern California the houses all pretty much look the same: single story homes that are 3-4 bedroom, 1 or 2 bathroom with stucco exterior, Spanish/Mexican influence, and have little yards with fake grass, few trees, and the address painted on the curb of the street. Of course there are exceptions such as Beverly Hills or the wealthy parts of Orange and S.D. County.
I agree with this. Actually, I noticed a lot of houses in the CA suburbs have those cookie cutter single family homes. All look pretty much the same with the same front yard.

Also on airplane trips, it's easy to spot those cookie cutter suburb streets with the same roofs in different parts of the country. ^___^
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Old 09-28-2008, 11:15 PM
 
Location: South Dakota
1,961 posts, read 6,174,416 times
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I would not say which one is "the" worst, but think that Las Vegas (outside of the strip) and Phoenix are ones that come to my mind as having more that their fair share of cookie cutter areas. Denver/Colorado Springs area has it also. Each metro has it and even in Upper-Midwest cities such as Minneapolis-St. Paul metro, Sioux Falls, Des Moines metro, and Omaha. Sioux Falls, SD has cookie-cutter areas, a lot of it in the southwest part of the city and other fringe areas where a lot of starter homes have been built in the past decade or so. Some of the bedroom communities within a few miles of Sioux Falls have this too. A lot of these homes are split-foyer/split-level homes due to the high water table and clay-based soil in the area. These homes are functional in that it allows the basement to be finished and having less water problems as opposed to a ranch-style home with a full basement.

Personally, I do not care for the cookie cutter neighborhoods and would like to see more diversity in housing styles and architecture to allow each home to have its own character and personality. But the cookie cutter homes are cost effective and efficient for the developers putting homes up. The issue relates to efficiency vs. architectural diversity. One has to figure in the soil, water table, and terrain in the process. Why not find a nice middle point. One can have affordable and functional houses but have at least some diversity in housing styles.
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Old 09-29-2008, 07:09 AM
 
769 posts, read 2,011,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gobigred View Post
What is vanilla???
Vanilla means plain.
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Old 09-29-2008, 06:56 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by j33 View Post
Oh cities have 'em too, there are several streets in Chicago that look like this.
Quote:
Originally Posted by matt345 View Post





These homes all have pretty much the same exterior and interior (layout) and it looks as if they were also mass produced. But wait, they're city row houses so there's no way they can be cookie-cutter!

Really, I have no problem with these homes. I think they're very charming and suit the city well. However, I can't help but notice that they all look alike and most likely share the same interior floor plan.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris19 View Post
I would not say which one is "the" worst, but think that Las Vegas (outside of the strip) and Phoenix are ones that come to my mind as having more that their fair share of cookie cutter areas. Denver/Colorado Springs area has it also. Each metro has it and even in Upper-Midwest cities such as Minneapolis-St. Paul metro, Sioux Falls, Des Moines metro, and Omaha. Sioux Falls, SD has cookie-cutter areas, a lot of it in the southwest part of the city and other fringe areas where a lot of starter homes have been built in the past decade or so. Some of the bedroom communities within a few miles of Sioux Falls have this too. A lot of these homes are split-foyer/split-level homes due to the high water table and clay-based soil in the area. These homes are functional in that it allows the basement to be finished and having less water problems as opposed to a ranch-style home with a full basement.

Personally, I do not care for the cookie cutter neighborhoods and would like to see more diversity in housing styles and architecture to allow each home to have its own character and personality. But the cookie cutter homes are cost effective and efficient for the developers putting homes up. The issue relates to efficiency vs. architectural diversity. One has to figure in the soil, water table, and terrain in the process. Why not find a nice middle point. One can have affordable and functional houses but have at least some diversity in housing styles.
We keep going in circles. Here are some examples of older "cookie cutter" houses.

Add: You have to go back to the original posts to see the pictures apparently.
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Old 10-03-2008, 11:09 PM
 
Location: The Valley of the Sun
97 posts, read 189,633 times
Reputation: 130
The problem here is that we are stuck with what is permitted, due to the lobbyists for the old style.. read that as Victorian, Colonial, Spanish, (stucco over particle board/osb etc) - in other words: something that will prove to be a money pit.. generating a perpetual aftermarket for the damages wrought by weather.. termites.. rotting, etc, but junky & $$$ to keep livable. I think a house should be a source of protection & maximum comfort with minimum materials, time & labor.

Here is an example of how other countries are moving forward (as we once were: http://www.e-architect.co.uk/brazil/porto_alegre_house.htm

And: Passive house in Greece - Images (slide show)

Excerpted below is their theme. I totally agree with that approach to living. Here they like to play up being 'green' but that is a farce. To American businesses it means" use wood, make it 'look' semi-modern, but use materials that need forever replacement.

Too bad we are so far away from that. We once had a modernistic way to look at living in America. But that was sooo long ago. And I remember.. do any of you..?

Quote:
The Office For Earth Architecture approach to design is:
To consider Earth as The House “oikos” in Greek “ecos”, an ecosystem which is proven, of limited capacity.
To consider, read and explore the multiple-infinite folds of Architecture.
To confront aggregation with diversity and systematic process.
To consider Architecture not as a self referential entity but as a force that is always flowing. Therefore time is of essence. Time transforms spaces. A space which is not consider static but rather as a projective canvas of activities. Spaces are volumes of light. Light reveals the multilayer’s of spaces, the multiple and unpredictable use of spaces.
Sustainability - The concept of sustainable approach (not only for Architecture) is to feel and sense that Earth resources are of limited capacity and to delimit-eliminate waste because simply we have no garbage bag to through them.
To materialize a line is an act, requires action, with future consequences before and long after construction.
Bioclimatic: To adopt and incorporate alternative design and construction principles VS the “sclerotic” oil barrel economy .A prospective attitude for life.
To confront the Spartan(way of thinking) with contemporary luxury( way of living).To redefine “luxury” and to replace with new meaningful values.
To unify exterior and interior, to create a microclimate as design strategy.
Transparency and simplicity through versatility.
Biodiversity - Protect us from been alone on the planet.
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