U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-09-2010, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,522 posts, read 7,468,006 times
Reputation: 10927

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Here's the new version of my map.

Midwest boundaries - Google Maps


The rust belt or lower midwest goes no further north than Flint or Grand Rapids in my opinon. Even Flint which has all the attributes of a rust belt city, is surrounded by nothing but farms and woods. It is an Island of rust belt surrounded by more typical midwest. No way is the thumb of Michigan rust belt either, im not sure they have one factory over there. I agree with you that parts of southern Michigan are more lower midwest, but they are further south than Flint. I think Grand Rapids is an upper midwest town, as is Midland, Bay City etc. Like I said before, I-96 or I 94 would be my boundry between Michigans upper midwest areas and lower midwest areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-09-2010, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,570,502 times
Reputation: 3232
MN55, some of those Rapid City pictures remind me of Wisconsin. The buffalo pictures are classic Great Plains Midwestern - you wouldn't see that in Utah or Nevada. While there is some western influence, Rapid City is still a solidly Midwestern town, more similar to Sioux Falls than Cheyenne. If anything, I would say that eastern Montana, eastern Wyoming and eastern Colorado are Midwest instead of West. The real "west" starts at the Rocky Mountains.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2010, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,570,502 times
Reputation: 3232
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
The rust belt or lower midwest goes no further north than Flint or Grand Rapids in my opinon. Even Flint which has all the attributes of a rust belt city, is surrounded by nothing but farms and woods. It is an Island of rust belt surrounded by more typical midwest. No way is the thumb of Michigan rust belt either, im not sure they have one factory over there. I agree with you that parts of southern Michigan are more lower midwest, but they are further south than Flint. I think Grand Rapids is an upper midwest town, as is Midland, Bay City etc. Like I said before, I-96 or I 94 would be my boundry between Michigans upper midwest areas and lower midwest areas.
Those areas are still more Ohio than Minnesota. 30 miles north of I-96 is a good Upper Midwest/Lower Midwest line in Michigan. Big Rapids = Upper Midwest, Grand Rapids = Rust Belt/Central/Lower Midwest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2010, 10:13 PM
 
1,080 posts, read 1,985,002 times
Reputation: 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
MN55, some of those Rapid City pictures remind me of Wisconsin. The buffalo pictures are classic Great Plains Midwestern - you wouldn't see that in Utah or Nevada. While there is some western influence, Rapid City is still a solidly Midwestern town, more similar to Sioux Falls than Cheyenne. If anything, I would say that eastern Montana, eastern Wyoming and eastern Colorado are Midwest instead of West. The real "west" starts at the Rocky Mountains.

Where in Wisconsin do you find sand hills covered in pine trees, praires with roaming cattle and buffalo, mainstreets lined with wood buildings displaying gold rush signs, and salons. I've been over much of Wisconsin and went to school there for four years and I don't see anything in those SD pics that look familiar; I did see lots of lakes and farms in WI, which are common throughout most of the upper Midwest, but not Western SD. There is no way any part of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado are Midwestern; SD is very similar to these places and is also Western.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2010, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,570,502 times
Reputation: 3232
Here's a new version. I've added a "Western Midwest" for areas like Rapid City and made changes to the Rust Belt and Lower Midwest. Also, keep in mind that this is a CULTURAL map, not a physiographical map.

Midwest boundaries - Google Maps
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2010, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,570,502 times
Reputation: 3232
Yes, I included extreme NE Montana in the Upper Midwest. Notice the Norwegians in Northwest ND and Northeast MT.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2010, 11:19 PM
 
481 posts, read 1,637,609 times
Reputation: 317
What I am seeing is that Minnesota and the surrounding region plays a "Deep Upper Midwest" role just as Alabama and Mississippi play the "Deep South" role. I don't want to get hung up on semantics - lets just take it as read that Minnesota, the eastern Dakotas, northern Iowa and west/northwest Wisconsin are "Nord land" or "Lutherville" or "the Kingdom of grumpy old ice fishers" - that's the smallest region that everyone can agree on - and just cut it out of the discussion since the only squabbles have been about its peripheries. I'm much more interested in figuring the rest of the Midwest out.

Remember that famous old saw about Yankees: To a foreigner a Yankee is an American. To an American a Yankee is a Northerner. To a Northerner a Yankee is from New England. To a New Englander a Yankee is from Vermont. To a Vermonter a Yankee is from North Vermont. To a Northern Vermonter a Yankee is someone who eats pie for breakfast.

We get to be defined by what we're not: The upper Midwest is not New York or Los Angeles or Atlanta to a foreigner, To an American its not New England or the South or the West or Texas, To someone who is not from one of the above its "North of here" or "West of here" but "not here" ... and so on down the line...

Its an onion, we could argue that point forever.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2010, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,150,737 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Here's a new version. I've added a "Western Midwest" for areas like Rapid City and made changes to the Rust Belt and Lower Midwest. Also, keep in mind that this is a CULTURAL map, not a physiographical map.

Midwest boundaries - Google Maps
Pittsburgh is Lower Midwest?

Just give it a rest already.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2010, 12:28 AM
 
1,080 posts, read 1,985,002 times
Reputation: 597
flyingwriter - your latest map is great!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2010, 05:30 AM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,073,712 times
Reputation: 2275
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeStater View Post
I've read this whole thread and in my opinion, you are the only one who has got the regions right. Your Great Plains region is correct: it's all of North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, 90% of Kansas, northwest corner of Missouri, western Iowa, and western Minnesota (technically it includes portions of Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana as well but those areas are not in the Midwest). Your upper Midwest region is also correct in that it includes Iowa north and east of Des Moines. That whole northeast quadrant of Iowa is upper Midwest, but many people here especially the Minneapolis people seem to think it is either Great Plains or rust belt.

The only thing I would take issue with is the distinction between rust belt and upper Midwest. I still think this is an unnecessary distinction in places like eastern Wisconsin and northern Illinois. Those areas are upper Midwest. It seems to be only Minneapolis people who think the Milwaukee/Chicago area is not upper Midwest.
You noticed that, too? Really, Wisconsin and Michigan are Great Lakes States. Minnesota and Illinois are considered Great Lakes States as well, but Wisconsin and Michigan have substantially more "Lake" than these other two states. I would also say that the Great Lakes States are considered Upper Midwest. You can draw maps and say what you want, but it is what it is.

Last edited by NowInWI; 07-10-2010 at 05:42 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top