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Old 07-10-2010, 12:51 PM
 
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Cleveland is more like Buffalo and Pittsburgh and Milwaukee than it is like Indianapolis. Just saying.
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Old 07-10-2010, 08:48 PM
 
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Buffalo is a Midwestern city? Since when?
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Old 07-10-2010, 09:39 PM
 
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When did I say Buffalo (or Pittsburgh before someone brings that up) was Midwestern. All I said is that it was similar to Cleveland. People say Minneapolis is similar to Seattle and Denver all the time yet no one is infering they're in the same region.
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Old 07-10-2010, 09:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Haver View Post
What I am seeing is that Minnesota and the surrounding region plays a "Deep Upper Midwest" role just as Alabama and Mississippi play the "Deep South" role. I don't want to get hung up on semantics - lets just take it as read that Minnesota, the eastern Dakotas, northern Iowa and west/northwest Wisconsin are "Nord land" or "Lutherville" or "the Kingdom of grumpy old ice fishers" - that's the smallest region that everyone can agree on - and just cut it out of the discussion since the only squabbles have been about its peripheries. I'm much more interested in figuring the rest of the Midwest out.

Remember that famous old saw about Yankees: To a foreigner a Yankee is an American. To an American a Yankee is a Northerner. To a Northerner a Yankee is from New England. To a New Englander a Yankee is from Vermont. To a Vermonter a Yankee is from North Vermont. To a Northern Vermonter a Yankee is someone who eats pie for breakfast.
That's pretty much it. It's a perception thing. One thing you will notice about the Midwest is that people who live in the northern portions of the Midwest (MN, WI, MI) don't think the southern portions (southern OH, IN, IL, MO, KS) are really part of the Midwest. People from the eastern portions of the Midwest (OH, IN, MI) don't think the western portions (KS, NE, SD, ND) are really part of the Midwest.

I live in Kansas, which is both in the southern and western portions of the Midwest. 90% of us who actually live in Kansas consider Kansas to be part of the Midwest. But to many people in the northern and eastern parts of the Midwest, Kansas is not part of the Midwest. Why? Because they consider where THEY live to be the "real" Midwest, so the farther away you are from where THEY live, the less Midwest you are.

The worst thing is when they put us in the South. Anyone with basic knowledge of U.S. history would never put Kansas in the South.
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Old 07-10-2010, 10:00 PM
 
1,054 posts, read 1,833,379 times
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Originally Posted by FreeStater View Post
That's pretty much it. It's a perception thing. One thing you will notice about the Midwest is that people who live in the northern portions of the Midwest (MN, WI, MI) don't think the southern portions (southern OH, IN, IL, MO, KS) are really part of the Midwest. People from the eastern portions of the Midwest (OH, IN, MI) don't think the western portions (KS, NE, SD, ND) are really part of the Midwest.

I live in Kansas, which is both in the southern and western portions of the Midwest. 90% of us who actually live in Kansas consider Kansas to be part of the Midwest. But to many people in the northern and eastern parts of the Midwest, Kansas is not part of the Midwest. Why? Because they consider where THEY live to be the "real" Midwest, so the farther away you are from where THEY live, the less Midwest you are.

The worst thing is when they put us in the South. Anyone with basic knowledge of U.S. history would never put Kansas in the South.
I think of Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri and Iowa as central. We have been considered part of almost every major US region before, so I'm okay with just declaring us four as central.
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Old 07-10-2010, 10:56 PM
 
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I'm from Minnesota and I definitely consider most of Kansas midwestern, especially the Kansas City, Lawrence, Topeka area as well as Wichita. Once you head start getting near Colorado or Oklahoma you begin to transition into the West or South. KS is definitely a midwestern state but it has southern and western influences that you just don't find in Minnesota and Wisconsin.
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Old 07-11-2010, 01:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
When did I say Buffalo (or Pittsburgh before someone brings that up) was Midwestern. All I said is that it was similar to Cleveland. People say Minneapolis is similar to Seattle and Denver all the time yet no one is infering they're in the same region.
Not you, the guy who drew the map. Take a look at it, he includes the western tier of counties in NYS (which includes Buffalo). I agree with you, Milwaukee and Cleveland and Pittsburgh share many similarities with Buffalo, but I would not agree that that makes Buffalo a Midwestern city, any more than Cleve & Milw's similarities with Buffalo makes them Northeastern cities.

Last edited by Ben Around; 07-11-2010 at 01:31 PM..
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Old 07-11-2010, 01:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by FreeStater View Post
That's pretty much it. It's a perception thing. One thing you will notice about the Midwest is that people who live in the northern portions of the Midwest (MN, WI, MI) don't think the southern portions (southern OH, IN, IL, MO, KS) are really part of the Midwest. People from the eastern portions of the Midwest (OH, IN, MI) don't think the western portions (KS, NE, SD, ND) are really part of the Midwest.

I live in Kansas, which is both in the southern and western portions of the Midwest. 90% of us who actually live in Kansas consider Kansas to be part of the Midwest. But to many people in the northern and eastern parts of the Midwest, Kansas is not part of the Midwest. Why? Because they consider where THEY live to be the "real" Midwest, so the farther away you are from where THEY live, the less Midwest you are.

The worst thing is when they put us in the South. Anyone with basic knowledge of U.S. history would never put Kansas in the South.
Good point. Similarly, many in the western Midwest (IA, SD, NE, KS, ND, MN) consider Cleveland and Detroit to be "Eastern". (I think they are the cousins of those who insist that Pittsburgh is "Midwestern.")
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Old 07-11-2010, 02:39 PM
 
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This is something I noticed with most regions. For whatever the region an areas residents think of themselves in, they only define the region as places close enough to their own geographically and culturally. This gets really prevelant when dealing with a cultural outlier in a region.

I am thinking maybe we should come up with a good definition of Midwest here to see what is really a part of it and to determine core and fringe areas. Also for this there should be two versions based on rural and urban areas.
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Old 07-11-2010, 03:47 PM
 
Location: MINNESOTA
1,178 posts, read 2,358,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
OK, 1 out of 5 million. Hardly worthy of claims that all Minnesotans think that we are the center of the upper midwest, as if that is relevant to anything anyways. What is more important is where the middle Midwest is.

I honestly think that most people from here in MN think of Minnesota as "The North" "Northland" or "Part of the Upper Midwest".
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